VS.

Thick vs. Broad

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Thickadjective

Relatively great in extent from one surface to the opposite in its smallest solid dimension.

Broadadjective

Wide in extent or scope.

‘three feet broad’; ‘the broad expanse of ocean’;

Thickadjective

Measuring a certain number of units in this dimension.

‘I want some planks that are two inches thick.’;

Broadadjective

Extended, in the sense of diffused; open; clear; full.

Thickadjective

Heavy in build; thickset.

‘He had such a thick neck that he had to turn his body to look to the side.’;

Broadadjective

Having a large measure of any thing or quality; unlimited; unrestrained.

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Thickadjective

Densely crowded or packed.

‘We walked through thick undergrowth.’;

Broadadjective

Comprehensive; liberal; enlarged.

Thickadjective

Having a viscous consistency.

‘My mum’s gravy was thick but at least it moved about.’;

Broadadjective

Plain; evident.

‘a broad hint’;

Thickadjective

Abounding in number.

‘The room was thick with reporters.’;

Broadadjective

(writing) Unsubtle; obvious.

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Thickadjective

Impenetrable to sight.

‘We drove through thick fog.’;

Broadadjective

Free; unrestrained; unconfined.

Thickadjective

Difficult to understand, or poorly articulated.

‘We had difficulty understanding him with his thick accent.’;

Broadadjective

(dated) Gross; coarse; indelicate.

‘a broad compliment; a broad joke; broad humour’;

Thickadjective

(informal) Stupid.

‘He was as thick as two short planks.’;

Broadadjective

(of an accent) Strongly regional.

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Thickadjective

(informal) Friendly or intimate.

‘They were as thick as thieves.’;

Broadadjective

(Gaelic languages) Velarized, i.e. not palatalized.

Thickadjective

Deep, intense, or profound.

‘Thick darkness.’;

Broadnoun

(dated) A prostitute, a woman of loose morals.

Thickadjective

troublesome; unreasonable

Broadnoun

A woman or girl.

‘Who was that broad I saw you with?’;

Thickadjective

Curvy and voluptuous, and especially having large hips.

Broadnoun

(UK) A shallow lake, one of a number of bodies of water in eastern Norfolk and Suffolk.

Thickadverb

In a thick manner.

‘Snow lay thick on the ground.’;

Broadnoun

A lathe tool for turning down the insides and bottoms of cylinders.

Thickadverb

Thickly.

‘Bread should be sliced thick to make toast.’;

Broadnoun

A British gold coin worth 20 shillings, issued by the Commonwealth of England in 1656.

Thickadverb

Frequently; in great numbers.

‘The arrows flew thick and fast around us.’;

Broadadjective

Wide; extend in breadth, or from side to side; - opposed to narrow; as, a broad street, a broad table; an inch broad.

Thicknoun

The thickest, or most active or intense, part of something.

‘It was mayhem in the thick of battle.’;

Broadadjective

Extending far and wide; extensive; vast; as, the broad expanse of ocean.

Thicknoun

A thicket.

Broadadjective

Extended, in the sense of diffused; open; clear; full.

Thicknoun

(slang) A stupid person; a fool.

Broadadjective

Fig.: Having a large measure of any thing or quality; not limited; not restrained; - applied to any subject, and retaining the literal idea more or less clearly, the precise meaning depending largely on the substantive.

‘A broad mixture of falsehood.’;

Thickverb

To thicken.

Broadadjective

Comprehensive; liberal; enlarged.

‘The words in the Constitution are broad enough to include the case.’; ‘In a broad, statesmanlike, and masterly way.’;

Thickadjective

Measuring in the third dimension other than length and breadth, or in general dimension other than length; - said of a solid body; as, a timber seven inches thick.

‘Were it as thick as is a branched oak.’; ‘My little finger shall be thicker than my father's loins.’;

Broadadjective

Plain; evident; as, a broad hint.

Thickadjective

Having more depth or extent from one surface to its opposite than usual; not thin or slender; as, a thick plank; thick cloth; thick paper; thick neck.

Broadadjective

Free; unrestrained; unconfined.

‘As broad and general as the casing air.’;

Thickadjective

Dense; not thin; inspissated; as, thick vapors. Also used figuratively; as, thick darkness.

‘Make the gruel thick and slab.’;

Broadadjective

Characterized by breadth. See Breadth.

Thickadjective

Not transparent or clear; hence, turbid, muddy, or misty; as, the water of a river is apt to be thick after a rain.

Broadadjective

Cross; coarse; indelicate; as, a broad compliment; a broad joke; broad humor.

Thickadjective

Abundant, close, or crowded in space; closely set; following in quick succession; frequently recurring.

‘The people were gathered thick together.’; ‘Black was the forest; thick with beech it stood.’;

Broadadjective

Strongly marked; as, a broad Scotch accent.

‘It is as broad as long, whether they rise to others, or bring others down to them.’;

Thickadjective

Not having due distinction of syllables, or good articulation; indistinct; as, a thick utterance.

Broadnoun

The broad part of anything; as, the broad of an oar.

Thickadjective

Deep; profound; as, thick sleep.

Broadnoun

The spread of a river into a sheet of water; a flooded fen.

Thickadjective

Dull; not quick; as, thick of fearing.

‘His dimensions to any thick sight were invincible.’;

Broadnoun

A lathe tool for turning down the insides and bottoms of cylinders.

Thickadjective

Intimate; very friendly; familiar.

‘We have been thick ever since.’;

Broadnoun

A woman, especially one who is sexually promiscuous; - usually considered offensive.

Thicknoun

The thickest part, or the time when anything is thickest.

‘In the thick of the dust and smoke.’;

Broadnoun

slang term for a woman;

‘a broad is a woman who can throw a mean punch’;

Thicknoun

A thicket; as, gloomy thicks.

‘Through the thick they heard one rudely rush.’; ‘He through a little window cast his sightThrough thick of bars, that gave a scanty light.’; ‘Through thick and thin she followed him.’; ‘He became the panegyrist, through thick and thin, of a military frenzy.’;

Broadadjective

having great (or a certain) extent from one side to the other;

‘wide roads’; ‘a wide necktie’; ‘wide margins’; ‘three feet wide’; ‘a river two miles broad’; ‘broad shoulders’; ‘a broad river’;

Thickadverb

Frequently; fast; quick.

Broadadjective

broad in scope or content;

‘across-the-board pay increases’; ‘an all-embracing definition’; ‘blanket sanctions against human-rights violators’; ‘an invention with broad applications’; ‘a panoptic study of Soviet nationality’; ‘granted him wide powers’;

Thickadverb

Closely; as, a plat of ground thick sown.

Broadadjective

not detailed or specific;

‘a broad rule’; ‘the broad outlines of the plan’; ‘felt an unspecific dread’;

Thickadverb

To a great depth, or to a greater depth than usual; as, land covered thick with manure.

Broadadjective

lacking subtlety; obvious;

‘gave us a broad hint that it was time to leave’;

Thickverb

To thicken.

‘The nightmare Life-in-death was she,Who thicks man's blood with cold.’;

Broadadjective

being at a peak or culminating point;

‘broad day’; ‘full summer’; ‘high noon’;

Thicknoun

the location of something surrounded by other things;

‘in the midst of the crowd’;

Broadadjective

very large in expanse or scope;

‘a broad lawn’; ‘the wide plains’; ‘a spacious view’; ‘spacious skies’;

Thickadjective

not thin; of a specific thickness or of relatively great extent from one surface to the opposite usually in the smallest of the three solid dimensions;

‘an inch thick’; ‘a thick board’; ‘a thick sandwich’; ‘spread a thick layer of butter’; ‘thick coating of dust’; ‘thick warm blankets’;

Broadadjective

(of speech) heavily and noticeably regional;

‘a broad southern accent’;

Thickadjective

closely crowded together;

‘a compact shopping center’; ‘a dense population’; ‘thick crowds’;

Broadadjective

showing or characterized by broad-mindedness;

‘a broad political stance’; ‘generous and broad sympathies’; ‘a liberal newspaper’; ‘tolerant of his opponent's opinions’;

Thickadjective

relatively dense in consistency;

‘thick cream’; ‘thick soup’; ‘thick smoke’; ‘thick fog’;

Thickadjective

spoken as if with a thick tongue;

‘the thick speech of a drunkard’; ‘his words were slurred’;

Thickadjective

wide from side to side;

‘a heavy black mark’;

Thickadjective

hard to pass through because of dense growth;

‘dense vegetation’; ‘thick woods’;

Thickadjective

(of darkness) very intense;

‘thick night’; ‘thick darkness’; ‘a face in deep shadow’; ‘deep night’;

Thickadjective

abundant;

‘a thick head of hair’;

Thickadjective

heavy and compact in form or stature;

‘a wrestler of compact build’; ‘he was tall and heavyset’; ‘stocky legs’; ‘a thick middle-aged man’; ‘a thickset young man’;

Thickadjective

(used informally) associated on close terms;

‘a close friend’; ‘the bartender was chummy with the regular customers’; ‘the two were thick as thieves for months’;

Thickadjective

used informally

Thickadjective

abundantly covered or filled;

‘the top was thick with dust’;

Thickadverb

with a thick consistency;

‘the blood was flowing thick’;

Thickadverb

in quick succession;

‘misfortunes come fast and thick’;

Thickadjective

with opposite sides or surfaces that are far or relatively far apart

‘the walls are 5 feet thick’; ‘thick slices of bread’; ‘thick metal cables’;

Thickadjective

(of a garment or other knitted or woven item) made of heavy material

‘a thick sweater’;

Thickadjective

(of writing or printing) consisting of broad lines

‘a headline in thick black type’;

Thickadjective

made up of a large number of things or people close together

‘the road winds through thick forest’; ‘his hair was long and thick’;

Thickadjective

densely filled or covered with

‘the air was thick with tension’; ‘the ground was thick with yellow leaves’;

Thickadjective

(of the air or atmosphere, or a substance in the air) opaque, dense, or heavy

‘a motorway pile-up in thick fog’; ‘a thick cloud of smoke’;

Thickadjective

(of a person's head) having a dull pain or heavy feeling, especially as a result of a hangover or illness

‘influenza can cause a thick head’; ‘Stephen woke late, his head thick and his mouth sour’;

Thickadjective

(of a liquid or a semi-liquid substance) relatively firm in consistency; not flowing freely

‘thick mud’;

Thickadjective

of low intelligence; stupid

‘he's a bit thick’;

Thickadjective

(of a voice) not clear or distinct; hoarse or husky

‘Guy's voice was thick with desire’; ‘a snarling thick voice’;

Thickadjective

(of an accent) very marked and difficult to understand

‘a thick French accent’;

Thickadjective

having a very close, friendly relationship

‘he's very thick with the new master’;

Thicknoun

the most active or crowded part of something

‘we were in the thick of the battle’;

Thickadverb

in or with deep, dense, or heavy mass

‘bread spread thick with butter’;

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