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Tar vs. Asphalt

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Main Difference

The main difference between Tar and Asphalt is that the Tar is a substance and Asphalt is a sticky, black and highly viscous liquid or semi-solid form of petroleum; bitumen variety.

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Wikipedia
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  • Tar (noun)

    A black, oily, sticky, viscous substance, consisting mainly of hydrocarbons derived from organic materials such as wood, peat, or coal.

  • Tar (noun)

    Coal tar.

  • Tar (noun)

    A solid residual byproduct of tobacco smoke.

  • Tar (noun)

    A sailor, because of their tarpaulin clothes. Also Jack Tar.

  • Tar (noun)

    Black tar, a form of heroin.

  • Tar (noun)

    A program for archiving files, common on Unix.

  • Tar (noun)

    A file produced by such a program.

  • Tar (noun)

    A Persian long-necked, waisted instrument, shared by many cultures and countries in the Middle East and the Caucasus.

  • Tar (noun)

    A single-headed round frame drum originating in North Africa and the Middle East.

  • Tar (verb)

    To coat with tar.

  • Tar (verb)

    To besmirch.

    "The allegations tarred his name, even though he was found innocent."

  • Tar (verb)

    To create a tar archive.

  • Asphalt (noun)

    A sticky, black and highly viscous liquid or semi-solid, composed almost entirely of bitumen, that is present in most crude petroleums and in some natural deposits.

  • Asphalt (noun)

    asphalt concrete, a hard ground covering used for roads and walkways.

  • Asphalt (verb)

    To pave with asphalt.

Wiktionary
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  • Tar (noun)

    a dark, thick flammable liquid distilled from wood or coal, consisting of a mixture of hydrocarbons, resins, alcohols, and other compounds. It is used in road-making and for coating and preserving timber.

  • Tar (noun)

    a substance resembling tar, formed by burning tobacco or other material

    "high-tar cigarettes"

  • Tar (noun)

    a sailor.

  • Tar (verb)

    cover (something) with tar

    "a newly tarred road"

  • Asphalt (noun)

    a mixture of dark bituminous pitch with sand or gravel, used for surfacing roads, flooring, roofing, etc.

  • Asphalt (noun)

    the pitch used in asphalt, sometimes found in natural deposits but usually made by the distillation of crude oil.

  • Asphalt (verb)

    surface with asphalt.

Oxford Dictionary
  • Tar (noun)

    A sailor; a seaman.

  • Tar (noun)

    A thick, black, viscous liquid obtained by the distillation of wood, coal, etc., and having a varied composition according to the temperature and material employed in obtaining it.

  • Tar

    To smear with tar, or as with tar; as, to tar ropes; to tar cloth.

  • Asphalt (noun)

    Mineral pitch, Jews' pitch, or compact native bitumen. It is brittle, of a black or brown color and high luster on a surface of fracture; it melts and burns when heated, leaving no residue. It occurs on the surface and shores of the Dead Sea, which is therefore called Asphaltites, or the Asphaltic Lake. It is found also in many parts of Asia, Europe, and America. See Bitumen.

  • Asphalt (noun)

    A composition of bitumen, pitch, lime, and gravel, used for forming pavements, and as a water-proof cement for bridges, roofs, etc.; asphaltic cement. Artificial asphalt is prepared from coal tar, lime, sand, etc.

  • Asphalt

    To cover with asphalt; as, to asphalt a roof; asphalted streets.

Webster Dictionary
  • Tar (noun)

    any of various dark heavy viscid substances obtained as a residue

  • Tar (noun)

    a man who serves as a sailor

  • Tar (verb)

    coat with tar;

    "tar the roof"

    "tar the roads"

  • Asphalt (noun)

    mixed asphalt and crushed gravel or sand; used especially for paving but also for roofing

  • Asphalt (noun)

    a dark bituminous substance found in natural beds and as residue from petroleum distillation; consists mainly of hydrocarbons

  • Asphalt (verb)

    cover with tar or asphalt;

    "asphalt the driveway"

Princeton's WordNet

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