VS.

Tamarind vs. Tamari

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Tamarindnoun

(botany) A tropical tree, Tamarindus indica.

Tamarinoun

A type of soy sauce made without wheat, having a rich flavor.

Tamarindnoun

(culinary) The fruit of this tree; the pulp is used as spice in Asian cooking and in Worcestershire sauce.

Tamarindnoun

Other similar species:

Tamarindnoun

Diploglottis australis, native tamarind, a rainforest tree of Eastern Australia.

Tamarindnoun

Garcinia gummi-gutta, Malabar tamarind, native to Indonesia.

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Tamarindnoun

A velvet tamarind (Dialium spp.).

Tamarindnoun

(color) A dark brown colour, like that of tamarind pulp (also called tamarind brown).

Tamarindnoun

A leguminous tree (Tamarindus Indica) cultivated both the Indies, and the other tropical countries, for the sake of its shade, and for its fruit. The trunk of the tree is lofty and large, with wide-spreading branches; the flowers are in racemes at the ends of the branches. The leaves are small and finely pinnated.

Tamarindnoun

One of the preserved seed pods of the tamarind, which contain an acid pulp, and are used medicinally and for preparing a pleasant drink.

Tamarindnoun

long-lived tropical evergreen tree with a spreading crown and feathery evergreen foliage and fragrant flowers yielding hard yellowish wood and long pods with edible chocolate-colored acidic pulp

Tamarindnoun

large tropical seed pod with very tangy pulp that is eaten fresh or cooked with rice and fish or preserved for curries and chutneys

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Tamarind

Tamarind (Tamarindus indica) is a leguminous tree bearing edible fruit that is indigenous to tropical Africa. The genus Tamarindus is monotypic, meaning that it contains only this species.

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