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Succeed vs. Thrive — What's the Difference?

Succeed vs. Thrive — What's the Difference?

Difference Between Succeed and Thrive

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Succeed

To come next in time or order
She fell sick, and what succeeded was an outpouring of concern from her fans.

Thrive

(of a child, animal, or plant) grow or develop well or vigorously
The new baby thrived

Succeed

To replace another in office or position
The prince succeeded to the throne.

Thrive

To grow vigorously; flourish
Some plants thrive in sandy soil.

Succeed

To accomplish something desired or intended
"Success is counted sweetest / By those who ne'er succeed" (Emily Dickinson).
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Thrive

To be successful or make steady progress; prosper
The town has been thriving on tourism.

Succeed

(Obsolete) To pass to a person by way of inheritance.

Thrive

To grow or increase stature; to grow vigorously or luxuriantly, to flourish.
Not all animals thrive well in captivity.
To thrive upon hard work

Succeed

To come after (something) in time or order; follow
Winter succeeds autumn.

Thrive

To increase in wealth or success; to prosper, be profitable.
Since expanding in June, the business has really thrived.

Succeed

To come after and take the place of
The heir succeeded the king.

Thrive

To prosper by industry, economy, and good management of property; to increase in goods and estate; as, a farmer thrives by good husbandry.
Diligence and humility is the way to thrive in the riches of the understanding, as well as in gold.

Succeed

(transitive) To follow something in sequence or time.
Autumn succeeds summer.

Thrive

To prosper in any business; to have increase or success.
O son, why sit we here, each other viewingIdly, while Satan, our great author, thrives?
And so she throve and prospered.

Succeed

(transitive) To replace or supplant someone in order vis-à-vis an office, position, or title.
The king's eldest son succeeds his father on the throne.
After a contentious election, Jones succeeded Smith as president of the republic.
Take the place of

Thrive

To increase in bulk or stature; to grow vigorously or luxuriantly, as a plant; to flourish; as, young cattle thrive in rich pastures; trees thrive in a good soil.

Succeed

(intransitive) To come after or follow; to be subsequent or consequent; often with to.

Thrive

Grow stronger;
The economy was booming

Succeed

(intransitive) To come in the place of another person, thing, or event; to come next in the usual, natural, or prescribed course of things; to follow; hence, to come next in the possession of anything; often with to.
Following the death of his mother, he succeeded to the throne.
So, if the issue of the elder son succeed before the younger, the crown (or: property) falls to me.

Thrive

Gain in wealth

Succeed

(intransitive) To ascend the throne after the removal or death of the occupant.
Princess Buttercup succeeded to the throne as queen after King Willoughby died.

Succeed

(intransitive) To prevail in obtaining an intended objective or accomplishment; to prosper as a result or conclusion of a particular effort.
The persecution of any righteous practice has never succeeded in the face of history; in fact, it can expedite the collapse of the persecutory regime.
She succeeded in her efforts to repair the tank.

Succeed

(intransitive) To prosper or attain success and beneficial results in general.
Voted most likely to succeed

Succeed

To turn out, fare, do (well or ill).

Succeed

(transitive) To support; to prosper; to promote or give success to.

Succeed

(intransitive) To descend, as an estate or an heirloom, in the same family; to devolve; often with to.

Succeed

To fall heir to; to inherit.

Succeed

To go down or near with to.

Succeed

To follow in order; to come next after; hence, to take the place of; as, the king's eldest son succeeds his father on the throne; autumn succeeds summer.
As he saw him nigh succeed.

Succeed

To fall heir to; to inherit.

Succeed

To come after; to be subsequent or consequent to; to follow; to pursue.
Destructive effects . . . succeeded the curse.

Succeed

To support; to prosper; to promote.
Succeed my wish and second my design.

Succeed

To come in the place of another person, thing, or event; to come next in the usual, natural, or prescribed course of things; to follow; hence, to come next in the possession of anything; - often with to.
If the father left only daughters, they equally succeeded to him in copartnership.
Enjoy till I returnShort pleasures; for long woes are to succeed!

Succeed

To ascend the throne after the removal the death of the occupant.
No woman shall succeed in Salique land.

Succeed

To descend, as an estate or an heirloom, in the same family; to devolve.

Succeed

To obtain the object desired; to accomplish what is attempted or intended; to have a prosperous issue or termination; to be successful; as, he succeeded in his plans; his plans succeeded.
It is almost impossible for poets to succeed without ambition.
Spenser endeavored it in Shepherd's Kalendar; but neither will it succeed in English.

Succeed

To go under cover.
Will you to the cooler cave succeed!

Succeed

Attain success or reach a desired goal;
The enterprise succeeded
We succeeded in getting tickets to the show
She struggled to overcome her handicap and won

Succeed

Be the successor (of);
Carter followed Ford
Will Charles succeed to the throne?

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