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Stich vs. Stitch

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  • Stich (noun)

    A verse, of whatever measure or number of feet, especially a verse of Scripture.

  • Stich (noun)

    A part of a line of poetry, especially in the distichal poetry of the Hebrew Bible and in early Germanic heroic verse such as Beowulf, where the line is composed of two (occasionally three) such parts.

  • Stich (noun)

    A row, line, or rank of trees.

  • Stitch (noun)

    A single pass of a needle in sewing; the loop or turn of the thread thus made.

  • Stitch (noun)

    An arrangement of stitches in sewing, or method of stitching in some particular way or style.

    "cross stitch"

    "herringbone stitch"

  • Stitch (noun)

    An intense stabbing pain under the lower edge of the ribcage, brought on by exercise.

  • Stitch (noun)

    A single turn of the thread round a needle in knitting; a link, or loop, of yarn

    "drop a stitch"

    "take up a stitch"

  • Stitch (noun)

    An arrangement of stitches in knitting, or method of knitting in some particular way or style.

  • Stitch (noun)

    A space of work taken up, or gone over, in a single pass of the needle.

  • Stitch (noun)

    Any space passed over; distance.

  • Stitch (noun)

    A local sharp pain; an acute pain, like the piercing of a needle.

    "a stitch in the side"

  • Stitch (noun)

    A contortion, or twist.

  • Stitch (noun)

    Any least part of a fabric or dress.

    "to wet every stitch of clothes"

    "She didn't have a stitch on."

  • Stitch (noun)

    A furrow.

  • Stitch (verb)

    To form stitches in; especially, to sew in such a manner as to show on the surface a continuous line of stitches.

    "to stitch a shirt bosom."

  • Stitch (verb)

    To sew, or unite or attach by stitches.

    "to stitch printed sheets in making a book or a pamphlet."

  • Stitch (verb)

    To practice/practise stitching or needlework.

  • Stitch (verb)

    To form land into ridges.

  • Stitch (verb)

    To weld together through a series of connecting or overlapping spot welds.

  • Stitch (verb)

    To combine two or more photographs of the same scene into a single image.

    "I can use this software to stitch together a panorama."

  • Stitch (verb)

    To include, combine, or unite into a single whole.

Wiktionary
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  • Stich (noun)

    A verse, of whatever measure or number of feet.

  • Stich (noun)

    A line in the Scriptures; specifically (Hebrew Scriptures), one of the rhythmic lines in the poetical books and passages of the Old Treatment, as written in the oldest Hebrew manuscripts and in the Revised Version of the English Bible.

  • Stich (noun)

    A row, line, or rank of trees.

  • Stitch (noun)

    A single pass of a needle in sewing; the loop or turn of the thread thus made.

  • Stitch (noun)

    A single turn of the thread round a needle in knitting; a link, or loop, of yarn; as, to let down, or drop, a stitch; to take up a stitch.

  • Stitch (noun)

    A space of work taken up, or gone over, in a single pass of the needle; hence, by extension, any space passed over; distance.

  • Stitch (noun)

    A local sharp pain; an acute pain, like the piercing of a needle; as, a stitch in the side.

  • Stitch (noun)

    A contortion, or twist.

  • Stitch (noun)

    Any least part of a fabric or dress; as, to wet every stitch of clothes.

  • Stitch (noun)

    A furrow.

  • Stitch (noun)

    An arrangement of stitches, or method of stitching in some particular way or style; as, cross-stitch; herringbone stitch, etc.

  • Stitch

    To form stitches in; especially, to sew in such a manner as to show on the surface a continuous line of stitches; as, to stitch a shirt bosom.

  • Stitch

    To sew, or unite together by stitches; as, to stitch printed sheets in making a book or a pamphlet.

  • Stitch

    To form land into ridges.

  • Stitch (verb)

    To practice stitching, or needlework.

Webster Dictionary
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Princeton's WordNet

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