Push vs. Pull - What's the difference?

Wiktionary

  • Push (verb)

    To apply a force to (an object) such that it moves away from the person or thing applying the force.

    "In his anger he pushed me against the wall and threatened me."

    "You need to push quite hard to get this door open."

  • Push (verb)

    To continually attempt to persuade (a person) into a particular course of action.

  • Push (verb)

    To press or urge forward; to drive.

    "to push an objection too far; to push one's luck"

  • Push (verb)

    To continually promote (a point of view, a product for sale, etc.).

    "Stop pushing the issue — I'm not interested."

    "They're pushing that perfume again."

    "There were two men hanging around the school gates today, pushing drugs."

  • Push (verb)

    To approach; to come close to.

    "My old car is pushing 250,000 miles."

    "He's pushing sixty. (= he's nearly sixty years old)"

  • Push (verb)

    To tense the muscles in the abdomen in order to expel its contents.

    "During childbirth, there are times when the obstetrician advises the woman not to push."

  • Push (verb)

    To continue to attempt to persuade a person into a particular course of action.

  • Push (verb)

    To make a higher bid at an auction.

  • Push (verb)

    To make an all-in bet.

  • Push (verb)

    To move (a pawn) directly forward.

  • Push (verb)

    To add (a data item) to the top of a stack.

  • Push (verb)

    To publish (an update, etc.) by transmitting it to other computers.

  • Push (verb)

    To thrust the points of the horns against; to gore.

  • Push (verb)

    To burst out of its pot, as a bud or shoot.

  • Push (verb)

    To strike the cue ball in such a way that it stays in contact with the cue and object ball at the same time (a foul shot)

  • Push (noun)

    A short, directed application of force; an act of pushing.

    "Give the door a hard push if it sticks."

  • Push (noun)

    An act of tensing the muscles of the abdomen in order to expel its contents.

    "One more push and the baby will be out."

  • Push (noun)

    A great effort (to do something).

    "Some details got lost in the push to get the project done."

    "Let's give one last push on our advertising campaign."

  • Push (noun)

    An attempt to persuade someone into a particular course of action.

  • Push (noun)

    A marching or drill maneuver/manoeuvre performed by moving a formation (especially a company front) forward or toward the audience, usually to accompany a dramatic climax or crescendo in the music.

  • Push (noun)

    A wager that results in no loss or gain for the bettor as a result of a tie or even score

  • Push (noun)

    The addition of a data item to the top of a stack.

  • Push (noun)

    The situation where a server sends data to a client without waiting for a request, as in server push, push technology.

  • Push (noun)

    A particular crowd or throng or people.

  • Push (noun)

    A foul shot in which the cue ball is in contact with the cue and the object ball at the same time

  • Push (noun)

    A pustule; a pimple.

  • Pull (interjection)

    Command used by a target shooter to request that the target be released/launched.

  • Pull (noun)

    An act of pulling (applying force)

    "He gave the hair a sharp pull and it came out."

  • Pull (noun)

    An attractive force which causes motion towards the source

    "The spaceship came under the pull of the gas giant."

    "iron fillings drawn by the pull of a magnet"

    "She took a pull on her cigarette."

  • Pull (noun)

    Any device meant to be pulled, as a lever, knob, handle, or rope

    "a zipper pull"

  • Pull (noun)

    Something in one's favour in a comparison or a contest; an advantage; means of influencing.

    "In weights the favourite had the pull."

  • Pull (noun)

    Appeal or attraction (as of a movie star)

  • Pull (noun)

    The situation where a client sends out a request for data from a server, as in server pull, pull technology

  • Pull (noun)

    A journey made by rowing

  • Pull (noun)

    A contest; a struggle.

    "a wrestling pull"

  • Pull (noun)

    Loss or violence suffered.

  • Pull (noun)

    The act of drinking.

    "to take a pull at a mug of beer"

  • Pull (noun)

    A kind of stroke by which a leg ball is sent to the off side, or an off ball to the side.

  • Pull (noun)

    A mishit shot which travels in a straight line and (for a right-handed player) left of the intended path.

  • Pull (verb)

    To apply a force to (an object) so that it comes toward the person or thing applying the force.

    "When I give the signal, pull the rope."

    "You're going to have to pull harder to get that cork out of the bottle."

  • Pull (verb)

    To gather with the hand, or by drawing toward oneself; to pluck.

    "to pull fruit from a tree; to pull flax; to pull a finch"

  • Pull (verb)

    To attract or net; to pull in.

  • Pull (verb)

    To draw apart; to tear; to rend.

  • Pull (verb)

    To persuade (someone) to have sex with one.

    "I pulled at the club last night."

    "He's pulled that bird over there."

  • Pull (verb)

    To remove (something), especially from public circulation or availability.

    "Each day, they pulled the old bread and set out fresh loaves."

  • Pull (verb)

    To do or perform.

    "He regularly pulls 12-hour days, sometimes 14."

    "You'll be sent home if you pull another stunt like that."

  • Pull (verb)

    To retrieve or generate for use.

    "I'll have to pull a part number for that."

  • Pull (verb)

    To toss a frisbee with the intention of launching the disc across the length of a field.

  • Pull (verb)

    To row.

  • Pull (verb)

    To strain (a muscle, tendon, ligament, etc.).

  • Pull (verb)

    To draw (a hostile non-player character) into combat, or toward or away from some location or target.

  • Pull (verb)

    To score a certain amount of points in a sport.

  • Pull (verb)

    To hold back, and so prevent from winning.

    "The favourite was pulled."

  • Pull (verb)

    To take or make (a proof or impression); so called because hand presses were worked by pulling a lever.

  • Pull (verb)

    To strike the ball in a particular manner. (See noun sense.)

  • Pull (verb)

    To draw beer from a pump, keg, or other source.

    "Let's stop at Finnigan's. The barman pulls a good pint."

  • Pull (verb)

    To pull out from a yard or station; to leave.

Webster Dictionary

  • Push (noun)

    A pustule; a pimple.

  • Push (noun)

    A thrust with a pointed instrument, or with the end of a thing.

  • Push (noun)

    Any thrust. pressure, impulse, or force, or force applied; a shove; as, to give the ball the first push.

  • Push (noun)

    An assault or attack; an effort; an attempt; hence, the time or occasion for action.

  • Push (noun)

    The faculty of overcoming obstacles; aggressive energy; as, he has push, or he has no push.

  • Push (noun)

    A crowd; a company or clique of associates; a gang.

  • Push

    To press against with force; to drive or impel by pressure; to endeavor to drive by steady pressure, without striking; - opposed to draw.

  • Push

    To thrust the points of the horns against; to gore.

  • Push

    To press or urge forward; to drive; to push an objection too far.

  • Push

    To bear hard upon; to perplex; to embarrass.

  • Push

    To importune; to press with solicitation; to tease.

  • Push (verb)

    To make a thrust; to shove; as, to push with the horns or with a sword.

  • Push (verb)

    To make an advance, attack, or effort; to be energetic; as, a man must push in order to succeed.

  • Push (verb)

    To burst pot, as a bud or shoot.

  • Pull

    To draw, or attempt to draw, toward one; to draw forcibly.

  • Pull

    To draw apart; to tear; to rend.

  • Pull

    To gather with the hand, or by drawing toward one; to pluck; as, to pull fruit; to pull flax; to pull a finch.

  • Pull

    To move or operate by the motion of drawing towards one; as, to pull a bell; to pull an oar.

  • Pull

    To hold back, and so prevent from winning; as, the favorite was pulled.

  • Pull

    To take or make, as a proof or impression; - hand presses being worked by pulling a lever.

  • Pull

    To strike the ball in a particular manner. See Pull, n., 8.

  • Pull (verb)

    To exert one's self in an act or motion of drawing or hauling; to tug; as, to pull at a rope.

  • Pull (noun)

    The act of pulling or drawing with force; an effort to move something by drawing toward one.

  • Pull (noun)

    A contest; a struggle; as, a wrestling pull.

  • Pull (noun)

    A pluck; loss or violence suffered.

  • Pull (noun)

    A knob, handle, or lever, etc., by which anything is pulled; as, a drawer pull; a bell pull.

  • Pull (noun)

    The act of rowing; as, a pull on the river.

  • Pull (noun)

    The act of drinking; as, to take a pull at the beer, or the mug.

  • Pull (noun)

    Something in one's favor in a comparison or a contest; an advantage; means of influencing; as, in weights the favorite had the pull.

  • Pull (noun)

    A kind of stroke by which a leg ball is sent to the off side, or an off ball to the side.

Princeton's WordNet

  • Push (noun)

    the act of applying force in order to move something away;

    "he gave the door a hard push"

    "the pushing is good exercise"

  • Push (noun)

    the force used in pushing;

    "the push of the water on the walls of the tank"

    "the thrust of the jet engines"

  • Push (noun)

    enterprising or ambitious drive;

    "Europeans often laugh at American energy"

  • Push (noun)

    an electrical switch operated by pressing a button;

    "the elevator was operated by push buttons"

    "the push beside the bed operated a buzzer at the desk"

  • Push (noun)

    an effort to advance;

    "the army made a push toward the sea"

  • Push (verb)

    move with force,

    "He pushed the table into a corner"

  • Push (verb)

    press, drive, or impel (someone) to action or completion of an action;

    "He pushed her to finish her doctorate"

  • Push (verb)

    make publicity for; try to sell (a product);

    "The salesman is aggressively pushing the new computer model"

    "The company is heavily advertizing their new laptops"

  • Push (verb)

    strive and make an effort to reach a goal;

    "She tugged for years to make a decent living"

    "We have to push a little to make the deadline!"

    "She is driving away at her doctoral thesis"

  • Push (verb)

    press against forcefully without being able to move;

    "she pushed against the wall with all her strength"

  • Push (verb)

    approach a certain age or speed;

    "She is pushing fifty"

  • Push (verb)

    exert oneself continuously, vigorously, or obtrusively to gain an end or engage in a crusade for a certain cause or person; be an advocate for;

    "The liberal party pushed for reforms"

    "She is crusading for women's rights"

    "The Dean is pushing for his favorite candidate"

  • Push (verb)

    sell or promote the sale of (illegal goods such as drugs);

    "The guy hanging around the school is pushing drugs"

  • Push (verb)

    move strenuously and with effort;

    "The crowd pushed forward"

  • Push (verb)

    make strenuous pushing movements during birth to expel the baby;

    "`Now push hard,' said the doctor to the woman"

  • Pull (noun)

    the act of pulling; applying force to move something toward or with you;

    "the pull up the hill had him breathing harder"

    "his strenuous pulling strained his back"

  • Pull (noun)

    the force used in pulling;

    "the pull of the moon"

    "the pull of the current"

  • Pull (noun)

    special advantage or influence;

    "the chairman's nephew has a lot of pull"

  • Pull (noun)

    a device used for pulling something;

    "he grabbed the pull and opened the drawer"

  • Pull (noun)

    a sharp strain on muscles or ligaments;

    "the wrench to his knee occurred as he fell"

    "he was sidelined with a hamstring pull"

  • Pull (noun)

    a slow inhalation (as of tobacco smoke);

    "he took a puff on his pipe"

    "he took a drag on his cigarette and expelled the smoke slowly"

  • Pull (noun)

    a sustained effort;

    "it was a long pull but we made it"

  • Pull (verb)

    cause to move along the ground by pulling;

    "draw a wagon"

    "pull a sled"

  • Pull (verb)

    direct toward itself or oneself by means of some psychological power or physical attributes;

    "Her good looks attract the stares of many men"

    "The ad pulled in many potential customers"

    "This pianist pulls huge crowds"

    "The store owner was happy that the ad drew in many new customers"

  • Pull (verb)

    move into a certain direction;

    "the car pulls to the right"

  • Pull (verb)

    apply force so as to cause motion towards the source of the motion;

    "Pull the rope"

    "Pull the handle towards you"

    "pull the string gently"

    "pull the trigger of the gun"

    "pull your kneees towards your chin"

  • Pull (verb)

    perform an act, usually with a negative connotation;

    "perpetrate a crime"

    "pull a bank robbery"

  • Pull (verb)

    bring, take, or pull out of a container or from under a cover;

    "draw a weapon"

    "pull out a gun"

    "The mugger pulled a knife on his victim"

  • Pull (verb)

    steer into a certain direction;

    "pull one's horse to a stand"

    "Pull the car over"

  • Pull (verb)

    strain abnormally;

    "I pulled a muscle in my leg when I jumped up"

    "The athlete pulled a tendon in the competition"

  • Pull (verb)

    cause to move in a certain direction by exerting a force upon, either physically or in an abstract sense;

    "A declining dollar pulled down the export figures for the last quarter"

  • Pull (verb)

    operate when rowing a boat;

    "pull the oars"

  • Pull (verb)

    rein in to keep from winning a race;

    "pull a horse"

  • Pull (verb)

    tear or be torn violently;

    "The curtain ripped from top to bottom"

    "pull the cooked chicken into strips"

  • Pull (verb)

    hit in the direction that the player is facing when carrying through the swing;

    "pull the ball"

  • Pull (verb)

    strip of feathers;

    "pull a chicken"

    "pluck the capon"

  • Pull (verb)

    draw or pull out, usually with some force or effort; also used in an abstract sense;

    "pull weeds"

    "extract a bad tooth"

    "take out a splinter"

    "extract information from the telegram"

  • Pull (verb)

    take sides with; align oneself with; show strong sympathy for;

    "We all rooted for the home team"

    "I'm pulling for the underdog"

    "Are you siding with the defender of the title?"

  • Pull (verb)

    take away;

    "pull the old soup cans from the supermarket shelf"

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