VS.

Principle vs. Discipline

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Principlenoun

A fundamental assumption or guiding belief.

‘We need some sort of principles to reason from.’;

Disciplinenoun

A controlled behaviour; self-control.

Principlenoun

A rule used to choose among solutions to a problem.

‘The principle of least privilege holds that a process should only receive the permissions it needs.’;

Disciplinenoun

An enforced compliance or control.

Principlenoun

Moral rule or aspect.

‘I don't doubt your principles.’; ‘You are clearly a person of principle.’; ‘It's the principle of the thing; I won't do business with someone I can't trust.’;

Disciplinenoun

A systematic method of obtaining obedience.

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Principlenoun

(physics) A rule or law of nature, or the basic idea on how the laws of nature are applied.

‘Bernoulli's Principle’; ‘The Pauli Exclusion Principle prevents two fermions from occupying the same state.’; ‘The principle of the internal combustion engine’;

Disciplinenoun

A state of order based on submission to authority.

Principlenoun

A fundamental essence, particularly one producing a given quality.

‘Many believe that life is the result of some vital principle.’;

Disciplinenoun

A punishment to train or maintain control.

Principlenoun

(obsolete) A beginning.

Disciplinenoun

A whip used for self-flagellation.

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Principlenoun

A source, or origin; that from which anything proceeds; fundamental substance or energy; primordial substance; ultimate element, or cause.

Disciplinenoun

A set of rules regulating behaviour.

Principlenoun

An original faculty or endowment.

Disciplinenoun

A flagellation as a means of obtaining sexual gratification.

Principleverb

(transitive) To equip with principles; to establish, or fix, in certain principles; to impress with any tenet or rule of conduct.

Disciplinenoun

A specific branch of knowledge or learning.

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Principlenoun

Beginning; commencement.

‘Doubting sad end of principle unsound.’;

Disciplinenoun

A category in which a certain art, sport or other activity belongs.

Principlenoun

A source, or origin; that from which anything proceeds; fundamental substance or energy; primordial substance; ultimate element, or cause.

‘The soul of man is an active principle.’;

Disciplineverb

(transitive) To train someone by instruction and practice.

Principlenoun

An original faculty or endowment.

‘Nature in your principles hath set [benignity].’; ‘Those active principles whose direct and ultimate object is the communication either of enjoyment or suffering.’;

Disciplineverb

(transitive) To teach someone to obey authority.

Principlenoun

A fundamental truth; a comprehensive law or doctrine, from which others are derived, or on which others are founded; a general truth; an elementary proposition; a maxim; an axiom; a postulate.

‘Therefore, leaving the principles of the doctrine of Christ, let us go on unto perfection.’; ‘A good principle, not rightly understood, may prove as hurtful as a bad.’;

Disciplineverb

(transitive) To punish someone in order to (re)gain control.

Principlenoun

A settled rule of action; a governing law of conduct; an opinion or belief which exercises a directing influence on the life and behavior; a rule (usually, a right rule) of conduct consistently directing one's actions; as, a person of no principle.

‘All kinds of dishonesty destroy our pretenses to an honest principle of mind.’;

Disciplineverb

(transitive) To impose order on someone.

Principlenoun

Any original inherent constituent which characterizes a substance, or gives it its essential properties, and which can usually be separated by analysis; - applied especially to drugs, plant extracts, etc.

‘Cathartine is the bitter, purgative principle of senna.’;

Disciplinenoun

The treatment suited to a disciple or learner; education; development of the faculties by instruction and exercise; training, whether physical, mental, or moral.

‘Wife and children are a kind of discipline of humanity.’; ‘Discipline aims at the removal of bad habits and the substitution of good ones, especially those of order, regularity, and obedience.’;

Principleverb

To equip with principles; to establish, or fix, in certain principles; to impress with any tenet, or rule of conduct, good or ill.

‘Governors should be well principled.’; ‘Let an enthusiast be principled that he or his teacher is inspired.’;

Disciplinenoun

Training to act in accordance with established rules; accustoming to systematic and regular action; drill.

‘Their wildness lose, and, quitting nature's part,Obey the rules and discipline of art.’;

Principlenoun

a basic generalization that is accepted as true and that can be used as a basis for reasoning or conduct;

‘their principles of composition characterized all their works’;

Disciplinenoun

Subjection to rule; submissiveness to order and control; habit of obedience.

‘The most perfect, who have their passions in the best discipline, are yet obliged to be constantly on their guard.’;

Principlenoun

a rule or standard especially of good behavior;

‘a man of principle’; ‘he will not violate his principles’;

Disciplinenoun

Severe training, corrective of faults; instruction by means of misfortune, suffering, punishment, etc.

‘A sharp discipline of half a century had sufficed to educate us.’;

Principlenoun

a basic truth or law or assumption;

‘the principles of democracy’;

Disciplinenoun

Correction; chastisement; punishment inflicted by way of correction and training.

‘Giving her the discipline of the strap.’;

Principlenoun

a rule or law concerning a natural phenomenon or the function of a complex system;

‘the principle of the conservation of mass’; ‘the principle of jet propulsion’; ‘the right-hand rule for inductive fields’;

Disciplinenoun

The subject matter of instruction; a branch of knowledge.

Principlenoun

rule of personal conduct

Disciplinenoun

The enforcement of methods of correction against one guilty of ecclesiastical offenses; reformatory or penal action toward a church member.

Principlenoun

(law) an explanation of the fundamental reasons (especially an explanation of the working of some device in terms of laws of nature);

‘the rationale for capital punishment’; ‘the principles of internal-combustion engines’;

Disciplinenoun

Self-inflicted and voluntary corporal punishment, as penance, or otherwise; specifically, a penitential scourge.

Principlenoun

a fundamental truth or proposition that serves as the foundation for a system of belief or behaviour or for a chain of reasoning

‘the basic principles of justice’;

Disciplinenoun

A system of essential rules and duties; as, the Romish or Anglican discipline.

Principlenoun

a rule or belief governing one's behaviour

‘she resigned over a matter of principle’; ‘struggling to be true to their own principles’;

Disciplineverb

To educate; to develop by instruction and exercise; to train.

Principlenoun

morally correct behaviour and attitudes

‘a man of principle’;

Disciplineverb

To accustom to regular and systematic action; to bring under control so as to act systematically; to train to act together under orders; to teach subordination to; to form a habit of obedience in; to drill.

‘Ill armed, and worse disciplined.’; ‘His mind . . . imperfectly disciplined by nature.’;

Principlenoun

a general scientific theorem or law that has numerous special applications across a wide field.

Disciplineverb

To improve by corrective and penal methods; to chastise; to correct.

‘Has he disciplined Aufidius soundly?’;

Principlenoun

a natural law forming the basis for the construction or working of a machine

‘these machines all operate on the same general principle’;

Disciplineverb

To inflict ecclesiastical censures and penalties upon.

Principlenoun

a fundamental source or basis of something

‘the first principle of all things was water’;

Disciplinenoun

a branch of knowledge;

‘in what discipline is his doctorate?’; ‘teachers should be well trained in their subject’; ‘anthropology is the study of human beings’;

Principlenoun

a fundamental quality determining the nature of something

‘the combination of male and female principles’;

Disciplinenoun

a system of rules of conduct or method of practice;

‘he quickly learned the discipline of prison routine’; ‘for such a plan to work requires discipline’;

Principlenoun

an active or characteristic constituent of a substance, obtained by simple analysis or separation

‘the active principle of Spanish fly’;

Disciplinenoun

the trait of being well behaved;

‘he insisted on discipline among the troops’;

Principle

A principle is a proposition or value that is a guide for behavior or evaluation. In law, it is a rule that has to be or usually is to be followed.

Disciplinenoun

training to improve strength or self-control

Disciplinenoun

the act of punishing;

‘the offenders deserved the harsh discipline they received’;

Disciplineverb

train by instruction and practice; especially to teach self-control;

‘Parents must discipline their children’; ‘Is this dog trained?’;

Disciplineverb

punish in order to gain control or enforce obedience;

‘The teacher disciplined the pupils rather frequently’;

Discipline

Discipline is action or inaction that is regulated to be in accordance (or to achieve accord) with a particular system of governance. Discipline is commonly applied to regulating human and animal behavior to its society or environment it belongs.

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