VS.

Monitor vs. Track

Published:
Views: 54

Monitornoun

Someone who watches over something; a person in charge of something or someone.

‘The camp monitors look after the children during the night, when the teachers are asleep.’;

Tracknoun

A mark left by something that has passed along.

‘Follow the track of the ship.’; ‘Can you see any tracks in the snow?’;

Monitornoun

A device that detects and informs on the presence, quantity, etc., of something.

Tracknoun

A mark or impression left by the foot, either of man or animal.

‘The fox tracks were still visible in the snow.’;

Monitornoun

(computing) A device similar to a television set used as to give a graphical display of the output from a computer.

‘The information flashed up on the monitor.’;

Tracknoun

The entire lower surface of the foot; said of birds, etc.

ADVERTISEMENT

Monitornoun

A studio monitor or loudspeaker.

Tracknoun

A road or other similar beaten path.

‘Follow the track for a hundred metres.’;

Monitornoun

(computing) A program for viewing and editing.

‘a machine code monitor’;

Tracknoun

Physical course; way.

‘Astronomers predicted the track of the comet.’;

Monitornoun

A student leader in a class.

Tracknoun

A path or course laid out for a race, for exercise, etc.

‘The athletes ran round the track.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Monitornoun

(nautical) One of a class of relatively small armored warships designed for shore bombardment or riverine warfare rather than combat with other ships.

Tracknoun

The direction and progress of someone or something; path.

Monitornoun

(archaic) An ironclad.

Tracknoun

(railways) The way or rails along which a train moves.

‘They briefly closed the railway to remove debris found on the track.’;

Monitornoun

A monitor lizard.

Tracknoun

A tract or area, such as of land.

ADVERTISEMENT

Monitornoun

(obsolete) One who admonishes; one who warns of faults, informs of duty, or gives advice and instruction by way of reproof or caution.

Tracknoun

Awareness of something, especially when arising from close monitoring.

Monitornoun

(engineering) A tool holder, as for a lathe, shaped like a low turret, and capable of being revolved on a vertical pivot so as to bring the several tools successively into position.

Tracknoun

(automotive) The distance between two opposite wheels on a same axletree (also track width)

Monitornoun

A monitor nozzle.

Tracknoun

(automotive) Short for caterpillar track.

Monitorverb

(transitive) To watch over; to guard.

Tracknoun

(cricket) The pitch.

Monitornoun

One who admonishes; one who warns of faults, informs of duty, or gives advice and instruction by way of reproof or caution.

‘You need not be a monitor to the king.’;

Tracknoun

Sound stored on a record.

Monitornoun

Hence, specifically, a pupil selected to look to the school in the absence of the instructor, to notice the absence or faults of the scholars, or to instruct a division or class.

Tracknoun

The physical track on a record.

Monitornoun

Any large Old World lizard of the genus Varanus; esp., the Egyptian species (Varanus Niloticus), which is useful because it devours the eggs and young of the crocodile. It is sometimes five or six feet long.

Tracknoun

(music) A song or other relatively short piece of music, on a record, separated from others by a short silence

‘My favourite track on the album is "Sunshine".’;

Monitornoun

An ironclad war vessel, very low in the water, and having one or more heavily-armored revolving turrets, carrying heavy guns.

Tracknoun

A circular (never-ending) data storage unit on a side of magnetic or optical disk, divided into sectors.

Monitornoun

A tool holder, as for a lathe, shaped like a low turret, and capable of being revolved on a vertical pivot so as to bring successively the several tools in holds into proper position for cutting.

Tracknoun

The racing events of track and field; track and field in general.

‘I'm going to try out for track next week.’;

Monitornoun

A monitor nozzle.

Tracknoun

A session talk on a conference.

Monitornoun

display consisting of a device that takes signals from a computer and displays them on a CRT screen

Trackverb

To continue observing over time.

Monitornoun

someone who supervises (an examination)

Trackverb

(transitive) To observe the (measured) state of a person or object over time.

‘We will track the raven population over the next six months.’;

Monitornoun

someone who gives a warning so that a mistake can be avoided

Trackverb

(transitive) To monitor the movement of a person or object.

‘Agent Miles has been tracking the terrorist since Madrid.’;

Monitornoun

an iron-clad vessel built by Federal forces to do battle with the Merrimac

Trackverb

(transitive) To match the movement or change of a person or object.

‘My height tracks my father's at my age, so I might end up as tall as him.’;

Monitornoun

electronic equipment that is used to check the quality or content of electronic transmissions

Trackverb

To travel so that a moving object remains in shot.

‘The camera tracked the ball even as the field of play moved back and forth, keeping the action in shot the entire time.’;

Monitornoun

a piece of electronic equipment that keeps track of the operation of a system continuously and warns of trouble

Trackverb

To move.

‘The hurricane tracked further west than expected.’;

Monitornoun

any of various large tropical carnivorous lizards of Africa and Asia and Australia; fabled to warn of crocodiles

Trackverb

(transitive) To follow the tracks of.

‘My uncle spent all day tracking the deer, whose hoofprints were clear in the mud.’;

Monitorverb

keep tabs on; keep an eye on; keep under surveillance

Trackverb

(transitive) To discover the location of a person or object.

‘I tracked Joe to his friend's bedroom, where he had spent the night.’;

Trackverb

(transitive) To leave in the form of tracks.

‘In winter, my cat tracks mud all over the house.’;

Trackverb

To create a musical recording (a track).

‘Lil Kyle is gonna track with that DJ next week.''’;

Trackverb

To create music using tracker software.

Tracknoun

A mark left by something that has passed along; as, the track, or wake, of a ship; the track of a meteor; the track of a sled or a wheel.

‘The bright track of his fiery car.’;

Tracknoun

A mark or impression left by the foot, either of man or beast; trace; vestige; footprint.

‘Far from track of men.’;

Tracknoun

The entire lower surface of the foot; - said of birds, etc.

Tracknoun

A road; a beaten path.

‘Behold Torquatus the same track pursue.’;

Tracknoun

Course; way; as, the track of a comet.

Tracknoun

A path or course laid out for a race, for exercise, etc.

Tracknoun

The permanent way; the rails.

Tracknoun

A tract or area, as of land.

Trackverb

To follow the tracks or traces of; to pursue by following the marks of the feet; to trace; to trail; as, to track a deer in the snow.

‘It was often found impossible to track the robbers to their retreats among the hills and morasses.’;

Trackverb

To draw along continuously, as a vessel, by a line, men or animals on shore being the motive power; to tow.

Tracknoun

a line or route along which something travels or moves;

‘the hurricane demolished houses in its path’; ‘the track of an animal’; ‘the course of the river’;

Tracknoun

evidence pointing to a possible solution;

‘the police are following a promising lead’; ‘the trail led straight to the perpetrator’;

Tracknoun

a pair of parallel rails providing a runway for wheels

Tracknoun

a course over which races are run

Tracknoun

a distinct selection of music from a recording or a compact disc;

‘he played the first cut on the cd’; ‘the title track of the album’;

Tracknoun

an endless metal belt on which tracked vehicles move over the ground

Tracknoun

(computer science) one of the circular magnetic paths on a magnetic disk that serve as a guide for writing and reading data

Tracknoun

a groove on a phonograph recording

Tracknoun

a bar or bars of rolled steel making a track along which vehicles can roll

Tracknoun

any road or path affording passage especially a rough one

Tracknoun

the act of participating in an athletic competition involving running on a track

Trackverb

carry on the feet and deposit;

‘track mud into the house’;

Trackverb

observe or plot the moving path of something;

‘track a missile’;

Trackverb

go after with the intent to catch;

‘The policeman chased the mugger down the alley’; ‘the dog chased the rabbit’;

Trackverb

travel across or pass over;

‘The caravan covered almost 100 miles each day’;

Trackverb

make tracks upon

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons