VS.

Memo vs. Notice

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Memonoun

A short note; a memorandum.

Noticenoun

The act of observing; perception.

‘He took no notice of the changes, and went on as though nothing had happened.’;

Memonoun

(computing) A record of partial results that can be reused later without recomputation.

Noticenoun

(countable) A written or printed announcement.

‘Shall we post a notice about the new policy?’; ‘I always read the death notices in the paper.’;

Memoverb

(informal) To record something; to make a note of something.

Noticenoun

(countable) A formal notification or warning.

‘The sidewalk adjacent to the damaged bridge stonework shall be closed until further notice.’;

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Memoverb

(informal) To send someone a note about something, for the record.

‘I made sure to memo him about the client's complaints.’;

Noticenoun

Advance notification of termination of employment, given by an employer to an employee or vice versa.

‘I gave her her mandatory two weeks' notice and sacked her.’; ‘I can't work here any longer. I'm giving notice.’;

Memonoun

a written proposal or reminder

Noticenoun

(countable) A published critical review of a play or the like.

Memonoun

a memorandum.

Noticenoun

(uncountable) Prior notification.

‘I don't mind if you want to change the venue; just give me some notice first, OK?’;

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Noticenoun

(dated) Attention; respectful treatment; civility.

Noticeverb

To remark upon; to mention.

Noticeverb

(transitive) To become aware of; to observe.

‘Did you notice the flowers in her yard?’;

Noticeverb

To lavish attention upon; to treat (someone) favourably.

Noticeverb

(intransitive) To be noticeable; to show.

Noticenoun

The act of noting, remarking, or observing; observation by the senses or intellect; cognizance; note.

‘How ready is envy to mingle with the notices we take of other persons!’;

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Noticenoun

Intelligence, by whatever means communicated; knowledge given or received; means of knowledge; express notification; announcement; warning.

‘I . . . have given him notice that the Duke of Cornwall and Regan his duchess will be here.’;

Noticenoun

An announcement, often accompanied by comments or remarks; as, book notices; theatrical notices.

Noticenoun

A writing communicating information or warning.

Noticenoun

Attention; respectful treatment; civility.

Noticeverb

To observe; to see; to mark; to take note of; to heed; to pay attention to.

Noticeverb

To show that one has observed; to take public note of; remark upon; to make comments on; to refer to; as, to notice a book.

‘This plant deserves to be noticed in this place.’; ‘Another circumstance was noticed in connection with the suggestion last discussed.’;

Noticeverb

To treat with attention and civility; as, to notice strangers.

Noticenoun

an announcement containing information about a future event;

‘you didn't give me enough notice’;

Noticenoun

the act of noticing or paying attention;

‘he escaped the notice of the police’;

Noticenoun

a request for payment;

‘the notification stated the grace period and the penalties for defaulting’;

Noticenoun

advance notification (usually written) of the intention to withdraw from an arrangement or contract;

‘we received a notice to vacate the premises’; ‘he gave notice two months before he moved’;

Noticenoun

a sign posted in a public place as an advertisement;

‘a poster advertised the coming attractions’;

Noticenoun

polite or favorable attention;

‘his hard work soon attracted the teacher's notice’;

Noticenoun

a short critical review;

‘the play received good notices’;

Noticeverb

discover or determine the existence, presence, or fact of;

‘She detected high levels of lead in her drinking water’; ‘We found traces of lead in the paint’;

Noticeverb

notice or perceive;

‘She noted that someone was following her’; ‘mark my words’;

Noticeverb

make or write a comment on;

‘he commented the paper of his colleague’;

Noticeverb

express recognition of the presence or existence of, or acquaintance with;

‘He never acknowledges his colleagues when they run into him in the hallway’; ‘She acknowledged his complement with a smile’; ‘it is important to acknowledge the work of others in one's own writing’;

Noticenoun

the fact of observing or paying attention to something

‘it has come to our notice that you have been missing school’; ‘their silence did not escape my notice’;

Noticenoun

notification or warning of something, especially to allow preparations to be made

‘interest rates are subject to fluctuation without notice’;

Noticenoun

a formal declaration of one's intention to end an agreement, typically one concerning employment or tenancy, at a specified time

‘his employers gave him two weeks' notice’; ‘she handed in her notice’;

Noticenoun

a displayed sheet or placard giving news or information

‘the jobs were advertised in a notice posted in the common room’;

Noticenoun

a small advertisement or announcement in a newspaper or magazine

‘an obituary notice’;

Noticenoun

a short published review of a new film, play, or book

‘she had good notices in her first film’;

Noticeverb

become aware of

‘I noticed that she was looking tired’; ‘they were too drunk to notice’; ‘he noticed the youths behaving suspiciously’;

Noticeverb

treat (someone) as worthy of recognition or attention

‘it was only last year that the singer really began to be noticed’;

Noticeverb

mention or remark on

‘she looked so much better that Sir Charles noticed it to Lady Harriet’;

Notice

Notice is the legal concept describing a requirement that a party be aware of legal process affecting their rights, obligations or duties. There are several types of notice: public notice (or legal notice), actual notice, constructive notice, and implied notice.

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