VS.

Logic vs. Reason

Published:
Views: 5,484

Main Difference

The main difference between Logic and Reason is that the Logic is a study of inference and demonstration and Reason is a capacity for consciously making sense of things.

ADVERTISEMENT
Wikipedia
ADVERTISEMENT
  • Logic (adjective)

    logical

  • Logic (noun)

    A method of human thought that involves thinking in a linear, step-by-step manner about how a problem can be solved. Logic is the basis of many principles including the scientific method.

  • Logic (noun)

    The study of the principles and criteria of valid inference and demonstration.

  • Logic (noun)

    The mathematical study of relationships between rigorously defined concepts and of mathematical proof of statements.

  • Logic (noun)

    A model-theoretic semantics.

  • Logic (noun)

    Any system of thought, whether rigorous and productive or not, especially one associated with a particular person.

    "It's hard to work out his system of logic."

  • Logic (noun)

    The part of a system (usually electronic) that performs the boolean logic operations, short for logic gates or logic circuit.

    "Fred is designing the logic for the new controller."

  • Logic (verb)

    To engage in excessive or inappropriate application of logic.

  • Logic (verb)

    To apply logical reasoning to.

  • Logic (verb)

    To overcome by logical argument.

  • Reason (noun)

    A cause:

  • Reason (noun)

    That which causes something: an efficient cause, a proximate cause.

    "The reason this tree fell is that it had rotted."

  • Reason (noun)

    A motive for an action or a determination.

    "The reason I robbed the bank was that I needed the money."

    "If you don't give me a reason to go with you, I won't."

  • Reason (noun)

    Rational faculties, collectively, of conception, judgment, deduction and intuition.

    "Mankind should develop reason above all other virtues."

  • Reason (noun)

    Something reasonable, in accordance with thought; justice.

  • Reason (noun)

    Ratio; proportion.

  • Reason (verb)

    To deduce or come to a conclusion by being rational

  • Reason (verb)

    To perform a process of deduction or of induction, in order to convince or to confute; to argue.

  • Reason (verb)

    To converse; to compare opinions.

  • Reason (verb)

    To arrange and present the reasons for or against; to examine or discuss by arguments; to debate or discuss.

    "I reasoned the matter with my friend."

  • Reason (verb)

    To support with reasons, as a request.

  • Reason (verb)

    To persuade by reasoning or argument.

    "to reason one into a belief; to reason one out of his plan"

  • Reason (verb)

    To adducing reasons.

    "to reason down a passion"

  • Reason (verb)

    To find by logical process; to explain or justify by reason or argument.

    "to reason out the causes of the librations of the moon'''"

Wiktionary
ADVERTISEMENT
  • Logic (noun)

    The science or art of exact reasoning, or of pure and formal thought, or of the laws according to which the processes of pure thinking should be conducted; the science of the formation and application of general notions; the science of generalization, judgment, classification, reasoning, and systematic arrangement; the science of correct reasoning.

  • Logic (noun)

    A treatise on logic; as, Mill's Logic.

  • Logic (noun)

    correct reasoning; as, I can't see any logic in his argument; also, sound judgment; as, the logic of surrender was uncontestable.

  • Logic (noun)

    The path of reasoning used in any specific argument; as, his logic was irrefutable.

  • Logic (noun)

    A function of an electrical circuit (called a gate) that mimics certain elementary binary logical operations on electrical signals, such as AND, OR, or NOT; as, a logic circuit; the arithmetic and logic unit.

  • Reason (noun)

    A thought or a consideration offered in support of a determination or an opinion; a just ground for a conclusion or an action; that which is offered or accepted as an explanation; the efficient cause of an occurrence or a phenomenon; a motive for an action or a determination; proof, more or less decisive, for an opinion or a conclusion; principle; efficient cause; final cause; ground of argument.

  • Reason (noun)

    The faculty or capacity of the human mind by which it is distinguished from the intelligence of the inferior animals; the higher as distinguished from the lower cognitive faculties, sense, imagination, and memory, and in contrast to the feelings and desires. Reason comprises conception, judgment, reasoning, and the intuitional faculty. Specifically, it is the intuitional faculty, or the faculty of first truths, as distinguished from the understanding, which is called the discursive or ratiocinative faculty.

  • Reason (noun)

    Due exercise of the reasoning faculty; accordance with, or that which is accordant with and ratified by, the mind rightly exercised; right intellectual judgment; clear and fair deductions from true principles; that which is dictated or supported by the common sense of mankind; right conduct; right; propriety; justice.

  • Reason (noun)

    Ratio; proportion.

  • Reason (verb)

    To exercise the rational faculty; to deduce inferences from premises; to perform the process of deduction or of induction; to ratiocinate; to reach conclusions by a systematic comparison of facts.

  • Reason (verb)

    Hence: To carry on a process of deduction or of induction, in order to convince or to confute; to formulate and set forth propositions and the inferences from them; to argue.

  • Reason (verb)

    To converse; to compare opinions.

  • Reason

    To arrange and present the reasons for or against; to examine or discuss by arguments; to debate or discuss; as, I reasoned the matter with my friend.

  • Reason

    To support with reasons, as a request.

  • Reason

    To persuade by reasoning or argument; as, to reason one into a belief; to reason one out of his plan.

  • Reason

    To overcome or conquer by adducing reasons; - with down; as, to reason down a passion.

  • Reason

    To find by logical processes; to explain or justify by reason or argument; - usually with out; as, to reason out the causes of the librations of the moon.

Webster Dictionary
  • Logic (noun)

    the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference

  • Logic (noun)

    reasoned and reasonable judgment;

    "it made a certain kind of logic"

  • Logic (noun)

    the principles that guide reasoning within a given field or situation;

    "economic logic requires it"

    "by the logic of war"

  • Logic (noun)

    a system of reasoning

  • Reason (noun)

    a rational motive for a belief or action;

    "the reason that war was declared"

    "the grounds for their declaration"

  • Reason (noun)

    an explanation of the cause of some phenomenon;

    "the reason a steady state was never reached was that the back pressure built up too slowly"

  • Reason (noun)

    the capacity for rational thought or inference or discrimination;

    "we are told that man is endowed with reason and capable of distinguishing good from evil"

  • Reason (noun)

    the state of having good sense and sound judgment;

    "his rationality may have been impaired"

    "he had to rely less on reason than on rousing their emotions"

  • Reason (noun)

    a justification for something existing or happening;

    "he had no cause to complain"

    "they had good reason to rejoice"

  • Reason (noun)

    a fact that logically justifies some premise or conclusion;

    "there is reason to believe he is lying"

  • Reason (verb)

    decide by reasoning; draw or come to a conclusion;

    "We reasoned that it was cheaper to rent than to buy a house"

  • Reason (verb)

    present reasons and arguments

  • Reason (verb)

    think logically;

    "The children must learn to reason"

Princeton's WordNet

Logic Illustrations

Reason Illustrations

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons