VS.

Load vs. Effort

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Loadnoun

A burden; a weight to be carried.

‘I struggled up the hill with the heavy load in my rucksack.’;

Effortnoun

The work involved in performing an activity; exertion.

‘It took a lot of effort to find a decent-sized, fully-furnished apartment within walking distance of the office.’; ‘He made a conscious effort to not appear affected by the stories in the paper.’;

Loadnoun

(figuratively) A worry or concern to be endured, especially in the phrase a load off one's mind.

Effortnoun

An endeavour.

‘Although he didn't win any medals, Johnson's effort at the Olympics won over many fans.’;

Loadnoun

A certain number of articles or quantity of material that can be transported or processed at one time.

‘The truck overturned while carrying a full load of oil.’; ‘She put another load of clothes in the washing machine.’;

Effortnoun

A force acting on a body in the direction of its motion.

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Loadnoun

(in combination) Used to form nouns that indicate a large quantity, often corresponding to the capacity of a vehicle

Effortverb

To make an effort.

Loadnoun

A large number or amount.

‘I got loads of presents for my birthday!’; ‘I got a load of emails about that.’;

Effortverb

To stimulate.

Loadnoun

The volume of work required to be performed.

‘Will our web servers be able to cope with that load?’;

Effortnoun

An exertion of strength or power, whether physical or mental, in performing an act or aiming at an object; more or less strenuous endeavor; struggle directed to the accomplishment of an object; as, an effort to scale a wall.

‘We prize the stronger effort of his power.’;

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Loadnoun

(engineering) The force exerted on a structural component such as a beam, girder, cable etc.

‘Each of the cross-members must withstand a tensile load of 1,000 newtons.’;

Effortnoun

A force acting on a body in the direction of its motion.

Loadnoun

(electrical engineering) The electrical current or power delivered by a device.

‘I'm worried that the load on that transformer will be too high.’;

Effortverb

To stimulate.

Loadnoun

(engineering) A resistive force encountered by a prime mover when performing work.

Effortnoun

earnest and conscientious activity intended to do or accomplish something;

‘made an effort to cover all the reading material’; ‘wished him luck in his endeavor’; ‘she gave it a good try’;

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Loadnoun

(electrical engineering) Any component that draws current or power from an electrical circuit.

‘Connect a second 24 ohm load across the power supply's output terminals.’;

Effortnoun

use of physical or mental energy; hard work;

‘he got an A for effort’; ‘they managed only with great exertion’;

Loadnoun

A unit of measure for various quantities.

Effortnoun

a series of actions advancing a principle or tending toward a particular end;

‘he supported populist campaigns’; ‘they worked in the cause of world peace’; ‘the team was ready for a drive toward the pennant’; ‘the movement to end slavery’; ‘contributed to the war effort’;

Loadnoun

A very small explosive inserted as a gag into a cigarette or cigar.

Effortnoun

a notable achievement;

‘he performed a great deed’; ‘the book was her finest effort’;

Loadnoun

The charge of powder for a firearm.

Loadnoun

(obsolete) Weight or violence of blows.

Loadnoun

The contents (e.g. semen) of an ejaculation.

Loadnoun

(euphemism) Nonsense; rubbish.

‘What a load!’;

Loadnoun

(computing) The process of loading something, i.e. transferring it into memory or over a network, etc.

‘All of those uncompressed images are going to slow down the page load.’;

Loadverb

(transitive) To put a load on or in (a means of conveyance or a place of storage).

‘The dock workers refused to load the ship.’;

Loadverb

(transitive) To place in or on a conveyance or a place of storage.

‘The longshoremen loaded the cargo quickly.’; ‘He loaded his stuff into his storage locker.’;

Loadverb

(intransitive) To put a load on something.

‘The truck was supposed to leave at dawn, but in fact we spent all morning loading.’;

Loadverb

(intransitive) To receive a load.

‘The truck is designed to load easily.’;

Loadverb

(intransitive) To be placed into storage or conveyance.

‘The containers load quickly and easily.’;

Loadverb

(transitive) To fill (a firearm or artillery) with munition.

‘I pulled the trigger, but nothing happened. I had forgotten to load the gun.’;

Loadverb

(transitive) To insert (an item or items) into an apparatus so as to ready it for operation, such as a reel of film into a camera, sheets of paper into a printer etc.

‘Now that you've loaded the film you're ready to start shooting.’;

Loadverb

(transitive) To fill (an apparatus) with raw material.

‘The workers loaded the blast furnace with coke and ore.’;

Loadverb

(intransitive) To be put into use in an apparatus.

‘The cartridge was designed to load easily.’;

Loadverb

To read (data or a program) from a storage medium into computer memory.

‘Click OK to load the selected data.’;

Loadverb

To transfer from a storage medium into computer memory.

‘This program takes an age to load.’;

Loadverb

To put runners on first, second and third bases

‘He walks to load the bases.’;

Loadverb

(transitive) To tamper with so as to produce a biased outcome.

‘You can load the dice in your favour by researching the company before your interview.’; ‘The wording of the ballot paper loaded the vote in favour of the Conservative candidate.’;

Loadverb

(transitive) To ask or adapt a question so that it will be more likely to be answered in a certain way.

Loadverb

(transitive) To encumber with something negative, to place as an encumbrance.

‘The new owners had loaded the company with debt.’; ‘The new owners loaded debt on the company.’;

Loadverb

(transitive) To provide in abundance.

‘He loaded his system with carbs before the marathon.’; ‘He loaded carbs into his system before the marathon.’;

Loadverb

(transitive) To weight (a cane, whip, etc.) with lead.

Loadverb

To adulterate or drug.

‘to load wine’;

Loadverb

To magnetize.

Loadnoun

A burden; that which is laid on or put in anything for conveyance; that which is borne or sustained; a weight; as, a heavy load.

‘He might such a loadTo town with his ass carry.’;

Loadnoun

The quantity which can be carried or drawn in some specified way; the contents of a cart, barrow, or vessel; that which will constitute a cargo; lading.

Loadnoun

That which burdens, oppresses, or grieves the mind or spirits; as, a load of care.

Loadnoun

A particular measure for certain articles, being as much as may be carried at one time by the conveyance commonly used for the article measured; as, a load of wood; a load of hay; specifically, five quarters.

Loadnoun

The charge of a firearm; as, a load of powder.

Loadnoun

Weight or violence of blows.

Loadnoun

The work done by a steam engine or other prime mover when working.

Loadnoun

The amount of work that a person, group, or machine is assigned to perform; as, the boss distributed the load evenly among his employees.

Loadnoun

The device or devices that consume power from a power supply.

Loadnoun

The weight or force that a structural support bears or is designed to bear; the object that creates that force.

Loadverb

To lay a load or burden on or in, as on a horse or in a cart; to charge with a load, as a gun; to furnish with a lading or cargo, as a ship; hence, to add weight to, so as to oppress or embarrass; to heap upon.

‘I strive all in vain to load the cart.’; ‘I have loaden me with many spoils.’; ‘Those honors deep and broad, wherewithYour majesty loads our house.’;

Loadverb

To adulterate or drug; as, to load wine.

Loadverb

To magnetize.

Loadnoun

weight to be borne or conveyed

Loadnoun

a quantity that can be processed or transported at one time;

‘the system broke down under excessive loads’;

Loadnoun

goods carried by a large vehicle

Loadnoun

an amount of alcohol sufficient to intoxicate;

‘he got a load on and started a brawl’;

Loadnoun

the power output of a generator or power plant

Loadnoun

an onerous or difficult concern;

‘the burden of responsibility’; ‘that's a load off my mind’;

Loadnoun

a deposit of valuable ore occurring within definite boundaries separating it from surrounding rocks

Loadnoun

the front part of a guided missile or rocket or torpedo that carries the nuclear or explosive charge or the chemical or biological agents

Loadnoun

electrical device to which electrical power is delivered

Loadverb

fill or place a load on;

‘load a car’; ‘load the truck with hay’;

Loadverb

provide with munition;

‘He loaded his gun carefully’;

Loadverb

put (something) on a structure or conveyance;

‘load the bags onto the trucks’;

Loadnoun

a heavy or bulky thing that is being carried or is about to be carried

‘in addition to their own food, they must carry a load of up to eighty pounds’;

Loadnoun

the total number or amount that can be carried in something, typically a vehicle or container

‘a lorry-load of soldiers’;

Loadnoun

a quantity of items washed or to be washed in a washing machine or dishwasher at one time

‘I do at least six loads of washing a week’;

Loadnoun

the material carried along by a stream, glacier, ocean current, etc.

‘the streams deposited their loads, leaving thin sheets of gravel or sand’;

Loadnoun

a weight or source of pressure borne by someone or something

‘the increased load on the heart caused by a raised arterial pressure’; ‘the arch has hollow spandrels to lighten the load on the foundations’;

Loadnoun

the amount of work to be done by a person or machine

‘Arthur has a light teaching load’;

Loadnoun

a burden of responsibility, worry, or grief.

Loadnoun

a lot of

‘she was talking a load of rubbish’;

Loadnoun

plenty

‘there's loads to see here, even when it rains’; ‘she spends loads of money on clothes’;

Loadnoun

the amount of power supplied by a source; the resistance of moving parts to be overcome by a motor

‘if the wire in the fuse is too thin to accept the load it will melt’;

Loadnoun

the amount of electricity supplied by a generating system at any given time.

Loadnoun

an impedance or circuit that receives or develops the output of a transistor or other device.

Loadverb

fill (a vehicle, ship, container, etc.) with a large amount of something

‘they go to Calais to load up their vans with cheap beer’;

Loadverb

place (a load or large quantity of something) on or in a vehicle, ship, container, etc.

‘stolen property from a burglary was loaded into a taxi’;

Loadverb

(of a ship or vehicle) take on a load

‘when we came to the quay the ship was still loading’;

Loadverb

take, buy, or consume a large amount of

‘I just went down to the store and loaded up on beer’;

Loadverb

make (someone or something) carry or hold a large or excessive quantity of heavy things

‘Elaine was loaded down with bags full of shopping’;

Loadverb

supply someone or something with (something) in overwhelming abundance or to excess

‘the King and Queen loaded Columbus with wealth and honours’;

Loadverb

bias towards a particular outcome

‘the odds were loaded against them before the match’;

Loadverb

charge (a firearm) with ammunition

‘he began to load the gun’;

Loadverb

insert something into (a device) so that it can be operated

‘load your camera before you start’; ‘following breakfast we clear the table and load the dishwasher’;

Loadverb

insert (something) into a device so that it will operate

‘load the cassette into the camcorder’;

Loadverb

transfer (a program or data) into memory, or into the central processor from storage

‘when the program is loaded into the microcomputer, the CPU carries out each instruction’;

Loadverb

add an extra charge to (an insurance premium) to take account of a factor that increases the risk.

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