VS.

Leap vs. Jump

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Leapverb

(intransitive) To jump.

Jumpverb

(intransitive) To propel oneself rapidly upward, downward and/or in any horizontal direction such that momentum causes the body to become airborne.

‘The boy jumped over a fence.’; ‘Kangaroos are known for their ability to jump high.’;

Leapverb

(transitive) To pass over by a leap or jump.

‘to leap a wall or a ditch’;

Jumpverb

(intransitive) To cause oneself to leave an elevated location and fall downward.

‘She is going to jump from the diving board.’;

Leapverb

(transitive) To copulate with (a female beast); to cover.

Jumpverb

(transitive) To pass by a spring or leap; to overleap.

‘to jump a stream’;

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Leapverb

(transitive) To cause to leap.

‘to leap a horse across a ditch’;

Jumpverb

(intransitive) To employ a parachute to leave an aircraft or elevated location.

Leapnoun

The act of leaping or jumping.

Jumpverb

(intransitive) To react to a sudden, often unexpected, stimulus (such as a sharp prick or a loud sound) by jerking the body violently.

‘The sudden sharp sound made me jump.’;

Leapnoun

The distance traversed by a leap or jump.

Jumpverb

(intransitive) To employ a move in certain board games where one game piece is moved from one legal position to another passing over the position of another piece.

‘The player's knight jumped the opponent's bishop.’;

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Leapnoun

A group of leopards.

Jumpverb

(transitive) To move to a position in (a queue/line) that is further forward.

‘I hate it when people jump the queue.’;

Leapnoun

(figuratively) A significant move forward.

Jumpverb

(transitive) To attack suddenly and violently.

‘The hoodlum jumped a woman in the alley.’;

Leapnoun

(figuratively) A large step in reasoning, often one that is not justified by the facts.

‘It's quite a leap to claim that those cloud formations are evidence of UFOs.’;

Jumpverb

To engage in sexual intercourse with (a person).

‘Harold: How is Sarah? I don't want to jump her while she's The Big Chill.’;

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Leapnoun

(mining) A fault.

Jumpverb

(transitive) To cause to jump.

‘The rider jumped the horse over the fence.’;

Leapnoun

Copulation with, or coverture of, a female beast.

Jumpverb

(transitive) To move the distance between two opposing subjects.

Leapnoun

(music) A passing from one note to another by an interval, especially by a long one, or by one including several other intermediate intervals.

Jumpverb

(transitive) To increase the height of a tower crane by inserting a section at the base of the tower and jacking up everything above it.

Leapnoun

(calendar) Intercalary, bissextile.

Jumpverb

To increase speed aggressively and without warning.

Leapnoun

(obsolete) A basket.

Jumpverb

To expose to danger; to risk; to hazard.

Leapnoun

A trap or snare for fish, made from twigs; a weely.

Jumpverb

To join by a buttweld.

Leapnoun

Half a bushel.

Jumpverb

To thicken or enlarge by endwise blows; to upset.

Leapnoun

A basket.

Jumpverb

(quarrying) To bore with a jumper.

Leapnoun

A weel or wicker trap for fish.

Jumpverb

(obsolete) To coincide; to agree; to accord; to tally; followed by with.

Leapnoun

The act of leaping, or the space passed by leaping; a jump; a spring; a bound.

‘Wickedness comes on by degrees, . . . and sudden leaps from one extreme to another are unnatural.’; ‘Changes of tone may proceed either by leaps or glides.’;

Jumpverb

To start executing code from a different location, rather than following the program counter.

Leapnoun

Copulation with, or coverture of, a female beast.

Jumpverb

To flee; to make one's escape.

Leapnoun

A fault.

Jumpnoun

The act of jumping; a leap; a spring; a bound.

Leapnoun

A passing from one note to another by an interval, especially by a long one, or by one including several other and intermediate intervals.

Jumpnoun

An effort; an attempt; a venture.

Leapverb

To spring clear of the ground, with the feet; to jump; to vault; as, a man leaps over a fence, or leaps upon a horse.

‘Leap in with me into this angry flood.’;

Jumpnoun

(mining) A dislocation in a stratum; a fault.

Leapverb

To spring or move suddenly, as by a jump or by jumps; to bound; to move swiftly. Also Fig.

‘My heart leaps up when I beholdA rainbow in the sky.’;

Jumpnoun

(architecture) An abrupt interruption of level in a piece of brickwork or masonry.

Leapverb

To pass over by a leap or jump; as, to leap a wall, or a ditch.

Jumpnoun

An instance of propelling oneself upwards.

‘The boy took a skip and a jump down the lane.’;

Leapverb

To copulate with (a female beast); to cover.

Jumpnoun

An object which causes one to jump, a ramp.

‘He went off a jump.’;

Leapverb

To cause to leap; as, to leap a horse across a ditch.

Jumpnoun

An instance of causing oneself to fall from an elevated location.

‘There were a couple of jumps from the bridge.’;

Leapnoun

a light springing movement upwards or forwards

Jumpnoun

An instance of employing a parachute to leave an aircraft or elevated location.

‘She was terrified before the jump, but was thrilled to be skydiving.’;

Leapnoun

an abrupt transition;

‘a successful leap from college to the major leagues’;

Jumpnoun

An instance of reacting to a sudden stimulus by jerking the body.

Leapnoun

a sudden and decisive increase;

‘a jump in attendance’;

Jumpnoun

A jumping move in a board game.

‘the knight's jump in chess’;

Leapnoun

the distance leaped (or to be leaped);

‘a leap of 10 feet’;

Jumpnoun

A button (of a joypad, joystick or similar device) used to make a video game character jump (propel itself upwards).

‘Press jump to start.’;

Leapverb

move forward by leaps and bounds;

‘The horse bounded across the meadow’; ‘The child leapt across the puddle’; ‘Can you jump over the fence?’;

Jumpnoun

An obstacle that forms part of a showjumping course, and that the horse has to jump over cleanly.

‘Heartless managed the scale the first jump but fell over the second.’;

Leapverb

pass abruptly from one state or topic to another;

‘leap into fame’; ‘jump to a conclusion’;

Jumpnoun

(with on) An early start or an advantage.

‘He got a jump on the day because he had laid out everything the night before.’; ‘Their research department gave them the jump on the competition.’;

Leapverb

cause to jump or leap;

‘the trainer jumped the tiger through the hoop’;

Jumpnoun

(mathematics) A discontinuity in the graph of a function, where the function is continuous in a punctured interval of the discontinuity.

Leapverb

jump or spring a long way, to a great height, or with great force

‘Fabia's heart leapt excitedly’; ‘he leapt on to the parapet’;

Jumpnoun

(science fiction) An instance of faster-than-light travel, not observable from ordinary space.

Leapverb

jump across

‘Peter leapt the last few stairs’;

Jumpnoun

(programming) A change of the path of execution to a different location.

Leapverb

move quickly and suddenly

‘Polly leapt to her feet’;

Jumpnoun

A kind of loose jacket for men.

Leapverb

make a sudden rush to do something; act eagerly and suddenly

‘everybody leapt into action’;

Jumpadverb

(obsolete) exactly; precisely

Leapverb

accept (an opportunity) eagerly

‘they leapt at the opportunity to combine fun with fund-raising’;

Jumpadjective

(obsolete) Exact; matched; fitting; precise.

Leapverb

(of a price, amount, etc.) increase dramatically

‘sales leapt by a third last year’;

Jumpnoun

A kind of loose jacket for men.

Leapverb

(especially of writing) be conspicuous; stand out

‘amid the notes, a couple of items leap out’;

Jumpnoun

The act of jumping; a leap; a spring; a bound.

Leapnoun

a forceful jump or quick movement

‘she came downstairs in a series of flying leaps’;

Jumpnoun

An effort; an attempt; a venture.

‘Our fortune liesUpon thisjump.’;

Leapnoun

a dramatic increase in price, amount, etc.

‘a leap of 75 per cent in two years’;

Jumpnoun

The space traversed by a leap.

Leapnoun

a sudden abrupt change or transition

‘it doesn't take a great leap of imagination to recognize that you have held an important leadership role’;

Jumpnoun

A dislocation in a stratum; a fault.

Leapnoun

a thing to be leaped over or from

‘Lover's Leap’;

Jumpnoun

An abrupt interruption of level in a piece of brickwork or masonry.

Leapnoun

a group of leopards

‘we stopped to photograph a leap of leopards’;

Jumpnoun

A jump-start; as, to get a jump from a passing mmotorist.

Jumpnoun

same as jump-start, n..

Jumpverb

To spring free from the ground by the muscular action of the feet and legs; to project one's self through the air; to spring; to bound; to leap.

‘Not the worst of the three but jumps twelve foot and a half by the square.’;

Jumpverb

To move as if by jumping; to bounce; to jolt.

‘A flock of geese jump down together.’;

Jumpverb

To coincide; to agree; to accord; to tally; - followed by with.

Jumpverb

To pass over by means of a spring or leap; to overleap; as, to jump a stream.

Jumpverb

To cause to jump; as, he jumped his horse across the ditch.

Jumpverb

To expose to danger; to risk; to hazard.

‘To jump a body with a dangerous physic.’;

Jumpverb

To join by a butt weld.

Jumpverb

To bore with a jumper.

Jumpverb

same as jump-start, v. t..

Jumpadjective

Nice; exact; matched; fitting; precise.

Jumpadverb

Exactly; pat.

Jumpnoun

a sudden and decisive increase;

‘a jump in attendance’;

Jumpnoun

an abrupt transition;

‘a successful leap from college to the major leagues’;

Jumpnoun

(film) an abrupt transition from one scene to another

Jumpnoun

a sudden involuntary movement;

‘he awoke with a start’;

Jumpnoun

descent with a parachute;

‘he had done a lot of parachuting in the army’;

Jumpnoun

the act of jumping; propelling yourself off the ground;

‘he advanced in a series of jumps’; ‘the jumping was unexpected’;

Jumpverb

move forward by leaps and bounds;

‘The horse bounded across the meadow’; ‘The child leapt across the puddle’; ‘Can you jump over the fence?’;

Jumpverb

move or jump suddenly, as if in surprise or alarm;

‘She startled when I walked into the room’;

Jumpverb

make a sudden physical attack on;

‘The muggers jumped the woman in the fur coat’;

Jumpverb

increase suddenly and significantly;

‘Prices jumped overnight’;

Jumpverb

be highly noticeable

Jumpverb

enter eagerly into;

‘He jumped into the game’;

Jumpverb

rise in rank or status;

‘Her new novel jumped high on the bestseller list’;

Jumpverb

run off or leave the rails;

‘the train derailed because a cow was standing on the tracks’;

Jumpverb

jump from an airplane and descend with a parachute

Jumpverb

cause to jump or leap;

‘the trainer jumped the tiger through the hoop’;

Jumpverb

start a car engine whose battery by connecting it to another car's battery

Jumpverb

bypass;

‘He skipped a row in the text and so the sentence was incomprehensible’;

Jumpverb

pass abruptly from one state or topic to another;

‘leap into fame’; ‘jump to a conclusion’;

Jumpverb

go back and forth; swing back and forth between two states or conditions

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