VS.

Gnome vs. Dwarf

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Gnomenoun

A brief reflection or maxim; a pithy saying.

Dwarfnoun

(mythology) Any member of a race of beings from (especially Scandinavian and other Germanic) folklore, usually depicted as having some sort of supernatural powers and being skilled in crafting and metalworking, often as short with long beards, and sometimes as clashing with elves.

Gnomenoun

An elemental (spirit or corporeal creature associated with a classical element) associated with earth.

Dwarfnoun

A person of short stature, often one whose limbs are disproportionately small in relation to the body as compared with normal adults, usually as the result of a genetic condition.

Gnomenoun

One of a legendary race of human-like beings, usually imagined as short and possibly bearded males, who inhabit the inner parts of the earth and act as guardians of mines, mineral treasure, etc.; in modern fantasy literature, when distinguished from dwarves, gnomes are usually even smaller than dwarves and more focussed on engineering than mining.

Dwarfnoun

An animal, plant or other thing much smaller than the usual of its sort.

‘dwarf tree’; ‘dwarf honeysuckle’;

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Gnomenoun

A dwarf; a goblin; a person of small stature or misshapen features, or of strange appearance.

Dwarfnoun

(star) A star of relatively small size.

Gnomenoun

The northern pygmy owl, Glaucidium gnoma, a small owl of the western United States.

Dwarfadjective

Miniature.

‘The specimen is a very dwarf form of the plant.’; ‘It is possible to grow the plants as dwarf as one desires.’;

Gnomenoun

A small statue of a dwarf-like character, often bearded, placed in a garden.

Dwarfverb

(transitive) To render (much) smaller, turn into a dwarf (version).

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Gnomenoun

An upper atmospheric optical phenomenon associated with thunderstorms, a compact blue starter.

Dwarfverb

(transitive) To make appear (much) smaller, puny, tiny.

‘The newly-built skyscraper dwarfs all older buildings in the downtown skyline.’;

Gnomenoun

A banker, especially a secretive international one.

‘the gnomes of Zurich’;

Dwarfverb

(transitive) To make appear insignificant.

‘Bach dwarfs all other composers.’;

Gnomenoun

An imaginary being, supposed by the Rosicrucians to inhabit the inner parts of the earth, and to be the guardian of mines, quarries, etc.

Dwarfverb

(intransitive) To become (much) smaller.

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Gnomenoun

A dwarf; a goblin; a person of small stature or misshapen features, or of strange appearance.

Dwarfverb

To hinder from growing to the natural size; to make or keep small; to stunt.

Gnomenoun

A small owl (Glaucidium gnoma) of the Western United States.

Dwarfnoun

An animal or plant which is much below the ordinary size of its species or kind.

Gnomenoun

A brief reflection or maxim.

Dwarfnoun

A diminutive human being, small in stature due to a pathological condition which causes a distortion of the proportions of body parts to each other, such as the limbs, torso, and head. A person of unusually small height who has normal body proportions is usually called a midget.

Gnomenoun

a legendary creature resembling a tiny old man; lives in the depths of the earth and guards buried treasure

Dwarfnoun

A small, usually misshapen person, typically a man, who may have magical powers; mythical dwarves were often depicted as living underground in caves.

Gnomenoun

a short pithy saying expressing a general truth

Dwarfverb

To hinder from growing to the natural size; to make or keep small; to stunt.

‘Even the most common moral ideas and affections . . . would be stunted and dwarfed, if cut off from a spiritual background.’;

Gnome

A gnome is a mythological creature and diminutive spirit in Renaissance magic and alchemy, first introduced by Paracelsus in the 16th century and later adopted by more recent authors including those of modern fantasy literature. Its characteristics have been reinterpreted to suit the needs of various story tellers, but it is typically said to be a small humanoid that lives underground.Diminutive statues of gnomes introduced as lawn ornaments during the 19th century grew in popularity during the 20th century and came to be known as garden gnomes.

Dwarfverb

To become small; to diminish in size.

‘Strange power of the world that, the moment we enter it, our great conceptions dwarf.’;

Dwarfnoun

a person who is abnormally small

Dwarfnoun

a legendary creature resembling a tiny old man; lives in the depths of the earth and guards buried treasure

Dwarfverb

make appear small by comparison;

‘This year's debt dwarves that of last year’;

Dwarfverb

check the growth of;

‘the lack of sunlight dwarfed these pines’;

Dwarfnoun

(in folklore or fantasy literature) a member of a mythical race of short, stocky humanlike creatures who are generally skilled in mining and metalworking.

Dwarfnoun

a person who is of unusually or abnormally small stature because of a medical condition; a person affected by dwarfism.

Dwarfnoun

a very short person.

Dwarfnoun

denoting something, especially an animal or plant, that is much smaller than the usual size for its type or species

‘a dwarf conifer’;

Dwarfnoun

a star of relatively small size and low luminosity, including the majority of main sequence stars.

Dwarfverb

cause to seem small or insignificant in comparison

‘the buildings surround and dwarf All Saints church’;

Dwarfverb

stunt the growth or development of

‘the insurance industry is still battling with a number of challenges that have dwarfed its growth’;

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