VS.

Gate vs. Entrance

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Gatenoun

A doorlike structure outside a house.

Entrancenoun

(countable) The action of entering, or going in.

‘Her entrance attracted no attention whatsoever.’;

Gatenoun

Doorway, opening, or passage in a fence or wall.

Entrancenoun

The act of taking possession, as of property, or of office.

‘the entrance of an heir upon his inheritance, or of a magistrate into office’;

Gatenoun

Movable barrier.

‘The gate in front of the railroad crossing went up after the train had passed.’;

Entrancenoun

(countable) The place of entering, as a gate or doorway.

‘Place your bag by the entrance so that you can find it easily.’;

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Gatenoun

(computing) A logical pathway made up of switches which turn on or off. Examples are and, or, nand, etc.

Entrancenoun

(uncountable) The right to go in.

‘You'll need a ticket to gain entrance to the museum.’; ‘to give entrance to friends’;

Gatenoun

(cricket) The gap between a batsman's bat and pad.

‘Singh was bowled through the gate, a very disappointing way for a world-class batsman to get out.’;

Entrancenoun

The entering upon; the beginning, or that with which the beginning is made; the commencement; initiation.

‘a difficult entrance into business’;

Gatenoun

The amount of money made by selling tickets to a concert or a sports event.

Entrancenoun

The causing to be entered upon a register, as a ship or goods, at a customhouse; an entering.

‘His entrance of the arrival was made the same day.’;

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Gatenoun

(flow cytometry) A line that separates particle type-clusters on two-dimensional dot plots.

Entrancenoun

(nautical) The angle which the bow of a vessel makes with the water at the water line.

Gatenoun

Passageway (as in an air terminal) where passengers can embark or disembark.

Entrancenoun

(nautical) The bow, or entire wedgelike forepart of a vessel, below the water line.

Gatenoun

(electronics) The controlling terminal of a field effect transistor (FET).

Entrancenoun

(music) When a musician starts playing or singing, entry.

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Gatenoun

In a lock tumbler, the opening for the stump of the bolt to pass through or into.

Entranceverb

(transitive) To delight and fill with wonder.

‘The children were immediately entranced by all the balloons.’;

Gatenoun

(metalworking) The channel or opening through which metal is poured into the mould; the ingate.

Entranceverb

(transitive) To put into a trance.

Gatenoun

The waste piece of metal cast in the opening; a sprue or sullage piece. Also written geat and git.

Entrancenoun

The act of entering or going into; ingress; as, the entrance of a person into a house or an apartment; hence, the act of taking possession, as of property, or of office; as, the entrance of an heir upon his inheritance, or of a magistrate into office.

Gatenoun

(cinematography) A mechanism, in a film camera and projector, that holds each frame momentarily stationary behind the aperture.

Entrancenoun

Liberty, power, or permission to enter; as, to give entrance to friends.

Gatenoun

A tally mark consisting of four vertical bars crossed by a diagonal, representing a count of five.

Entrancenoun

The passage, door, or gate, for entering.

‘Show us, we pray thee, the entrance into the city.’;

Gatenoun

A way, path.

Entrancenoun

The entering upon; the beginning, or that with which the beginning is made; the commencement; initiation; as, a difficult entrance into business.

‘St. Augustine, in the entrance of one of his discourses, makes a kind of apology.’;

Gatenoun

(obsolete) A journey.

Entrancenoun

The causing to be entered upon a register, as a ship or goods, at a customhouse; an entering; as, his entrance of the arrival was made the same day.

Gatenoun

A street; now used especially as a combining form to make the name of a street e.g. "Briggate" (a common street name in the north of England meaning "Bridge Street") or Kirkgate meaning "Church Street".

Entrancenoun

The angle which the bow of a vessel makes with the water at the water line.

Gatenoun

Manner; gait.

Entranceverb

To put into a trance; to make insensible to present objects.

‘Him, still entranced and in a litter laid,They bore from field and to the bed conveyed.’;

Gateverb

To keep something inside by means of a closed gate.

Entranceverb

To put into an ecstasy; to ravish with delight or wonder; to enrapture; to charm.

‘And I so ravished with her heavenly note,I stood entranced, and had no room for thought.’;

Gateverb

To punish, especially a child or teenager, by not allowing them to go out.

Entrancenoun

something that provides access (entry or exit);

‘they waited at the entrance to the garden’; ‘beggars waited just outside the entryway to the cathedral’;

Gateverb

(biochemistry) To open a closed ion channel.

Entrancenoun

a movement into or inward

Gateverb

(transitive) To furnish with a gate.

Entrancenoun

the act of entering;

‘she made a grand entrance’;

Gateverb

(transitive) To turn (an image intensifier) on and off selectively as needed, or to avoid damage. See autogating.

Entranceverb

attract; cause to be enamored;

‘She captured all the men's hearts’;

Gatenoun

A large door or passageway in the wall of a city, of an inclosed field or place, or of a grand edifice, etc.; also, the movable structure of timber, metal, etc., by which the passage can be closed.

Entranceverb

put into a trance

Gatenoun

An opening for passage in any inclosing wall, fence, or barrier; or the suspended framework which closes or opens a passage. Also, figuratively, a means or way of entrance or of exit.

‘Knowest thou the way to Dover?Both stile and gate, horse way and footpath.’; ‘Opening a gate for a long war.’;

Gatenoun

A door, valve, or other device, for stopping the passage of water through a dam, lock, pipe, etc.

Gatenoun

The places which command the entrances or access; hence, place of vantage; power; might.

‘The gates of hell shall not prevail against it.’;

Gatenoun

In a lock tumbler, the opening for the stump of the bolt to pass through or into.

Gatenoun

The channel or opening through which metal is poured into the mold; the ingate.

Gatenoun

A way; a path; a road; a street (as in Highgate).

‘I was going to be an honest man; but the devil has this very day flung first a lawyer, and then a woman, in my gate.’;

Gatenoun

Manner; gait.

Gateverb

To supply with a gate.

Gateverb

To punish by requiring to be within the gates at an earlier hour than usual.

Gatenoun

a door-like movable barrier in a fence or wall

Gatenoun

a computer circuit with several inputs but only one output that can be activated by particular combinations of inputs

Gatenoun

total admission receipts at a sports event

Gatenoun

passageway (as in an air terminal) where passengers can embark or disembark

Gateverb

supply with a gate;

‘The house was gated’;

Gateverb

control with a valve or other device that functions like a gate

Gateverb

restrict (school boys') movement to the dormitory or campus as a means of punishment

Gate

A gate or gateway is a point of entry to or from a space enclosed by walls. The word derived from old Norse meaning road or path; But other terms includ yett and port.

‘gat’;

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