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Gale vs. Tornado — What's the Difference?

Gale vs. Tornado — What's the Difference?

Difference Between Gale and Tornado

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Gale

A gale is a strong wind, typically used as a descriptor in nautical contexts. The U.S. National Weather Service defines a gale as 34–47 knots (63–87 km/h, 17.5–24.2 m/s or 39–54 miles/hour) of sustained surface winds.

Tornado

A tornado is a violently rotating column of air that is in contact with both the surface of the Earth and a cumulonimbus cloud or, in rare cases, the base of a cumulus cloud. The windstorm is often referred to as a twister, whirlwind or cyclone, although the word cyclone is used in meteorology to name a weather system with a low-pressure area in the center around which, from an observer looking down toward the surface of the earth, winds blow counterclockwise in the Northern Hemisphere and clockwise in the Southern.

Gale

A wind with a speed of from 34 to 40 knots (39 to 46 miles per hour; 63 to 74 kilometers per hour), according to the Beaufort scale. Also called fresh gale.

Tornado

A violently rotating column of air extending from a cumulonimbus cloud to the ground, ranging in width from a few meters to more than a kilometer, with destructive winds up to 510 kilometers (316 miles) per hour or higher. Tornadoes are typically associated with a funnel cloud pendant from a storm's wall cloud, often extending to the bottom of the tornado.

Gale

A storm at sea.
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Tornado

A violent thunderstorm in western Africa or nearby Atlantic waters.

Gale

Often gales A forceful outburst
Gales of laughter.

Tornado

A whirlwind or hurricane.

Gale

The sweet gale.

Tornado

(meteorology) A violent windstorm characterized by a mobile, twisting, funnel-shaped cloud.
A tornado is a rotating column of air.

Gale

To sing; charm; enchant.

Tornado

A violent whirling wind; specifically (Meteorol.), a tempest distinguished by a rapid whirling and slow progressive motion, usually accompaned with severe thunder, lightning, and torrents of rain, and commonly of short duration and small breadth; a small cyclone.

Gale

To cry; groan; croak.

Tornado

A localized and violently destructive windstorm occurring over land characterized by a funnel-shaped cloud extending toward the ground

Gale

To talk.

Tornado

A purified and potent form of cocaine that is smoked rather than snorted

Gale

To call.

Gale

To sing; utter with musical modulations.

Gale

(nautical) To sail, or sail fast.

Gale

(meteorology) A very strong wind, more than a breeze, less than a storm; number 7 through to 9 winds on the 12-step Beaufort scale.
It's blowing a gale outside.
Many parts of the boat were damaged in the gale.

Gale

An outburst, especially of laughter.
A gale of laughter

Gale

A light breeze.

Gale

A shrub, also called sweet gale or bog myrtle (Myrica gale), that grows on moors and fens.

Gale

(archaic) A periodic payment, such as is made of a rent or annuity.
Gale day - the day on which rent or interest is due.

Gale

A strong current of air; a wind between a stiff breeze and a hurricane. The most violent gales are called tempests.

Gale

A moderate current of air; a breeze.
A little gale will soon disperse that cloud.
And winds of gentlest gale Arabian odors fannedFrom their soft wings.

Gale

A state of excitement, passion, or hilarity.
The ladies, laughing heartily, were fast getting into what, in New England, is sometimes called a gale.

Gale

A song or story.

Gale

A plant of the genus Myrica, growing in wet places, and strongly resembling the bayberry. The sweet gale (Myrica Gale) is found both in Europe and in America.

Gale

The payment of a rent or annuity.

Gale

To sale, or sail fast.

Gale

To sing.

Gale

A strong wind moving 45-90 knots; force 7 to 10 on Beaufort scale

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