VS.

Freight vs. Fleet

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Freightnoun

Payment for transportation.

‘The freight was more expensive for cars than for coal.’;

Fleetnoun

A group of vessels or vehicles.

Freightnoun

Goods or items in transport.

‘The freight shifted and the trailer turned over on the highway.’;

Fleetnoun

Any group of associated items.

Freightnoun

Transport of goods.

‘They shipped it ordinary freight to spare the expense.’;

Fleetnoun

(nautical) A number of vessels in company, especially war vessels; also, the collective naval force of a country, etc.

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Freightnoun

(figurative) Cultural or emotional associations.

‘A wedding ring is small, but it has massive emotional freight.’;

Fleetnoun

Any command of vessels exceeding a squadron in size, or a rear admiral's command, composed of five sail-of-the-line, with any number of smaller vessels.

Freightverb

(transitive) To transport (goods).

Fleetnoun

An arm of the sea; a run of water, such as an inlet or a creek.

Freightverb

To load with freight. Also figurative.

Fleetnoun

(nautical) A location, as on a navigable river, where barges are secured.

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Freightnoun

That with which anything is fraught or laden for transportation; lading; cargo, especially of a ship, or a car on a railroad, etc.; as, a freight of cotton; a full freight.

Fleetverb

To float.

Freightnoun

The sum paid by a party hiring a ship or part of a ship for the use of what is thus hired.

Fleetverb

(transitive) To pass over rapidly; to skim the surface of.

‘a ship that fleets the gulf’;

Freightnoun

Freight transportation, or freight line.

Fleetverb

(ambitransitive) To hasten over; to cause to pass away lightly, or in mirth and joy.

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Freightadjective

Employed in the transportation of freight; having to do with freight; as, a freight car.

Fleetverb

(intransitive) To flee, to escape, to speed away.

Freightverb

To load with goods, as a ship, or vehicle of any kind, for transporting them from one place to another; to furnish with freight; as, to freight a ship; to freight a car.

Fleetverb

(intransitive) To evanesce, disappear, die out.

Freightnoun

goods carried by a large vehicle

Fleetverb

(nautical) To move up a rope, so as to haul to more advantage; especially to draw apart the blocks of a tackle.

Freightnoun

transporting goods commercially at rates cheaper than express rates

Fleetverb

To move or change in position.

Freightnoun

the charge for transporting something by common carrier;

‘we pay the freight’; ‘the freight rate is usually cheaper’;

Fleetverb

To shift the position of dead-eyes when the shrouds are become too long.

Freightverb

transport commercially as cargo

Fleetverb

To cause to slip down the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or chain.

Freightverb

load with goods for transportation

Fleetverb

To take the cream from; to skim.

Freightnoun

goods transported in bulk by truck, train, ship, or aircraft

‘a decline in the amount of freight carried by rail’;

Fleetadjective

(literary) Swift in motion; light and quick in going from place to place.

Freightnoun

the transport of goods by truck, train, ship, or aircraft

‘the truck-based system can outperform air freight at distances of up to seven hundred miles’;

Fleetadjective

(uncommon) Light; superficially thin; not penetrating deep, as soil.

Freightnoun

a charge for transport by freight

‘a bill indicating that the freight has been paid’;

Fleetverb

To sail; to float.

‘And in frail wood on Adrian Gulf doth fleet.’;

Freightnoun

a freight train

‘I can hear the regular wail of the twelve o'clock freight from my house’;

Fleetverb

To fly swiftly; to pass over quickly; to hasten; to flit as a light substance.

‘All the unaccomplished works of Nature's hand, . . . Dissolved on earth, fleet hither.’;

Freightnoun

a load or burden

‘these warm winds deposit their freight of moisture in showers of rain’;

Fleetverb

To slip on the whelps or the barrel of a capstan or windlass; - said of a cable or hawser.

Freightverb

transport (goods) in bulk by truck, train, ship, or aircraft

‘the metals had been freighted from the city’;

Fleetverb

To move or change in position; - said of persons; as, the crew fleeted aft.

Freightverb

be laden or burdened with

‘each word was freighted with anger’;

Fleetverb

To pass over rapidly; to skin the surface of; as, a ship that fleets the gulf.

Fleetverb

To hasten over; to cause to pass away lighty, or in mirth and joy.

‘Many young gentlemen flock to him, and fleet the time carelessly.’;

Fleetverb

To draw apart the blocks of; - said of a tackle.

Fleetverb

To cause to slip down the barrel of a capstan or windlass, as a rope or chain.

Fleetverb

To move or change in position; used only in special phrases; as, of fleet aft the crew.

‘We got the long "stick" . . . down and "fleeted" aft, where it was secured.’;

Fleetverb

To take the cream from; to skim.

Fleetadjective

Swift in motion; moving with velocity; light and quick in going from place to place; nimble.

‘In mail their horses clad, yet fleet and strong.’;

Fleetadjective

Light; superficially thin; not penetrating deep, as soil.

Fleetnoun

A number of vessels in company, especially war vessels; also, the collective naval force of a country, etc.

Fleetnoun

A flood; a creek or inlet; a bay or estuary; a river; - obsolete, except as a place name, - as Fleet Street in London.

‘Together wove we nets to entrap the fishIn floods and sedgy fleets.’;

Fleetnoun

A former prison in London, which originally stood near a stream, the Fleet (now filled up).

Fleetnoun

group of aircraft operating together under the same ownership

Fleetnoun

group of motor vehicles operating together under the same ownership

Fleetnoun

a group of steamships operating together under the same ownership

Fleetnoun

a group of warships organized as a tactical unit

Fleetverb

move along rapidly and lightly; skim or dart

Fleetverb

disappear gradually;

‘The pain eventually passed off’;

Fleetadjective

moving very fast;

‘fleet of foot’; ‘the fleet scurrying of squirrels’; ‘a swift current’; ‘swift flight of an arrow’; ‘a swift runner’;

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