VS.

Forge vs. Refine

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Forgenoun

Furnace or hearth where metals are heated prior to hammering them into shape.

Refineverb

(transitive) To purify; reduce to a fine, unmixed, or pure state; to free from impurities

‘to refine gold’; ‘to refine iron’; ‘to refine wine’; ‘to refine sugar’;

Forgenoun

Workshop in which metals are shaped by heating and hammering them.

Refineverb

(intransitive) To become pure; to be cleared of impure matter.

Forgenoun

The act of beating or working iron or steel.

Refineverb

(transitive) To purify of coarseness, vulgarity, inelegance etc.; to polish.

‘to refine someone's manners’; ‘to refine a language’; ‘A refined style’; ‘to refine one's tastes’;

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Forgeverb

(metallurgy) To shape a metal by heating and hammering.

Refineverb

(ambitransitive) To improve in accuracy, delicacy, or excellence.

Forgeverb

To form or create with concerted effort.

‘The politician's recent actions are an effort to forge a relationship with undecided voters.’;

Refineverb

(transitive) To make nice or subtle

‘to refine thought’; ‘to refine someone's language’;

Forgeverb

To create a forgery of; to make a counterfeit item of; to copy or imitate unlawfully.

‘He had to forge his ex-wife's signature.’; ‘The jury learned the documents had been forged.’;

Refineverb

To reduce to a fine, unmixed, or pure state; to free from impurities; to free from dross or alloy; to separate from extraneous matter; to purify; to defecate; as, to refine gold or silver; to refine iron; to refine wine or sugar.

‘I will bring the third part through the fire, and will refine them as silver is refined.’;

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Forgeverb

To make falsely; to produce, as that which is untrue or not genuine; to fabricate.

Refineverb

To purify from what is gross, coarse, vulgar, inelegant, low, and the like; to make elegant or exellent; to polish; as, to refine the manners, the language, the style, the taste, the intellect, or the moral feelings.

‘Love refinesThe thoughts, and heart enlarges.’;

Forgeverb

(often as forge ahead) To move forward heavily and slowly (originally as a ship); to advance gradually but steadily; to proceed towards a goal in the face of resistance or difficulty.

‘The party of explorers forged through the thick underbrush.’; ‘We decided to forge ahead with our plans even though our biggest underwriter backed out.’;

Refineverb

To become pure; to be cleared of feculent matter.

‘So the pure, limpid stream, when foul with stains,Works itself clear, and, as it runs, refines.’;

Forgeverb

(sometimes as forge ahead) To advance, move or act with an abrupt increase in speed or energy.

‘With seconds left in the race, the runner forged into first place.’;

Refineverb

To improve in accuracy, delicacy, or excellence.

‘Chaucer refined on Boccace, and mended his stories.’; ‘But let a lord once own the happy lines,How the wit brightens! How the style refines!’;

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Forgenoun

A place or establishment where iron or other metals are wrought by heating and hammering; especially, a furnace, or a shop with its furnace, etc., where iron is heated and wrought; a smithy.

‘In the quick forge and working house of thought.’;

Refineverb

To affect nicety or subtilty in thought or language.

Forgenoun

The works where wrought iron is produced directly from the ore, or where iron is rendered malleable by puddling and shingling; a shingling mill.

Refineverb

improve or perfect by pruning or polishing;

‘refine one's style of writing’;

Forgenoun

The act of beating or working iron or steel; the manufacture of metallic bodies.

‘In the greater bodies the forge was easy.’;

Refineverb

make more complex, intricate, or richer;

‘refine a design or pattern’;

Forgeverb

To form by heating and hammering; to beat into any particular shape, as a metal.

‘Mars's armor forged for proof eterne.’;

Refineverb

treat or prepare so as to put in a usable condition;

‘refine paper stock’; ‘refine pig iron’; ‘refine oil’;

Forgeverb

To form or shape out in any way; to produce; to frame; to invent.

‘Those names that the schools forged, and put into the mouth of scholars, could never get admittance into common use.’; ‘Do forge a life-long trouble for ourselves.’;

Refineverb

reduce to a fine, unmixed, or pure state; separate from extraneous matter or cleanse from impurities;

‘refine sugar’;

Forgeverb

To coin.

Refineverb

attenuate or reduce in vigor, strength, or validity by polishing or purifying;

‘many valuable nutrients are refined out of the foods in our modern diet’;

Forgeverb

To make falsely; to produce, as that which is untrue or not genuine; to fabricate; to counterfeit, as, a signature, or a signed document.

‘That paltry story is untrue,And forged to cheat such gulls as you.’; ‘Forged certificates of his . . . moral character.’;

Refineverb

make more precise or increase the discriminatory powers of;

‘refine a method of analysis’; ‘refine the constant in the equation’;

Forgeverb

To commit forgery.

Refineverb

remove impurities or unwanted elements from (a substance), typically as part of an industrial process

‘sugar was refined by boiling it in huge iron vats’;

Forgeverb

To move heavily and slowly, as a ship after the sails are furled; to work one's way, as one ship in outsailing another; - used especially in the phrase to forge ahead.

‘And off she [a ship] forged without a shock.’;

Refineverb

make minor changes so as to improve or clarify (a theory or method)

‘ease of access to computers has refined analysis and presentation of data’;

Forgeverb

To impel forward slowly; as, to forge a ship forward.

Forgenoun

furnace consisting of a special hearth where metal is heated before shaping

Forgenoun

a workplace where metal is worked by heating and hammering

Forgeverb

create by hammering;

‘hammer the silver into a bowl’; ‘forge a pair of tongues’;

Forgeverb

make a copy of with the intent to deceive;

‘he faked the signature’; ‘they counterfeited dollar bills’; ‘She forged a Green Card’;

Forgeverb

come up with (an idea, plan, explanation, theory, or priciple) after a mental effort;

‘excogitate a way to measure the speed of light’;

Forgeverb

move ahead steadily;

‘He forged ahead’;

Forgeverb

move or act with a sudden increase in speed or energy

Forgeverb

make something, usually for a specific function;

‘She molded the riceballs carefully’; ‘Form cylinders from the dough’; ‘shape a figure’; ‘Work the metal into a sword’;

Forgeverb

make out of components (often in an improvising manner);

‘She fashioned a tent out of a sheet and a few sticks’;

Forge

A forge is a type of hearth used for heating metals, or the workplace (smithy) where such a hearth is located. The forge is used by the smith to heat a piece of metal to a temperature where it becomes easier to shape by forging, or to the point where work hardening no longer occurs.

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