VS.

Faculty vs. School

Published:

Facultynoun

The academic staff at schools, colleges or universities, as opposed to the students or support staff.

Schoolnoun

(collective) A group of fish or a group of marine mammals such as porpoises, dolphins, or whales.

‘The divers encountered a huge school of mackerel.’;

Facultynoun

A division of a university.

‘She transferred from the Faculty of Science to the Faculty of Medicine.’;

Schoolnoun

A multitude.

Facultynoun

An ability, skill, or power, often plural.

‘He lived until he reached the age of 90 with most of his faculties intact.’;

Schoolnoun

An institution dedicated to teaching and learning; an educational institution.

‘Our children attend a public school in our neighborhood.’; ‘Harvard University is a famous American postsecondary school.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Facultynoun

A power, authority or privilege conferred by a higher authority.

Schoolnoun

(British) An educational institution providing primary and secondary education, prior to tertiary education (college or university).

Facultynoun

(Church of England) A licence to make alterations to a church.

Schoolnoun

(UK) At Eton College, a period or session of teaching.

‘Divinity, history and geography are studied for two schools per week.’;

Facultynoun

The members of a profession.

Schoolnoun

Within a larger educational institution, an organizational unit, such as a department or institute, which is dedicated to a specific subject area.

‘We are enrolled in the same university, but I attend the School of Economics and my brother is in the School of Music.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Facultynoun

Ability to act or perform, whether inborn or cultivated; capacity for any natural function; especially, an original mental power or capacity for any of the well-known classes of mental activity; psychical or soul capacity; capacity for any of the leading kinds of soul activity, as knowledge, feeling, volition; intellectual endowment or gift; power; as, faculties of the mind or the soul.

‘But know that in the soulAre many lesser faculties that serveReason as chief.’; ‘What a piece of work is a man ! how noble in reason ! how infinite in faculty !’;

Schoolnoun

An art movement, a community of artists.

Facultynoun

Special mental endowment; characteristic knack.

‘He had a ready faculty, indeed, of escaping from any topic that agitated his too sensitive and nervous temperament.’;

Schoolnoun

The followers of a particular doctrine; a particular way of thinking or particular doctrine; a school of thought.

‘These economists belong to the monetarist school.’;

Facultynoun

Power; prerogative or attribute of office.

‘This DuncanHath borne his faculties so meek.’;

Schoolnoun

The time during which classes are attended or in session in an educational institution.

‘I'll see you after school.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Facultynoun

Privilege or permission, granted by favor or indulgence, to do a particular thing; authority; license; dispensation.

‘The pope . . . granted him a faculty to set him free from his promise.’; ‘It had not only faculty to inspect all bishops' dioceses, but to change what laws and statutes they should think fit to alter among the colleges.’;

Schoolnoun

The room or hall in English universities where the examinations for degrees and honours are held.

Facultynoun

A body of a men to whom any specific right or privilege is granted; formerly, the graduates in any of the four departments of a university or college (Philosophy, Law, Medicine, or Theology), to whom was granted the right of teaching (profitendi or docendi) in the department in which they had studied; at present, the members of a profession itself; as, the medical faculty; the legal faculty, etc.

Schoolnoun

The canons, precepts, or body of opinion or practice, sanctioned by the authority of a particular class or age.

‘He was a gentleman of the old school.’;

Facultynoun

The body of person to whom are intrusted the government and instruction of a college or university, or of one of its departments; the president, professors, and tutors in a college.

Schoolnoun

An establishment offering specialized instruction, as for driving, cooking, typing, coding, etc.

Facultynoun

one of the inherent cognitive or perceptual powers of the mind

Schoolverb

(of fish) To form into, or travel in a school.

Facultynoun

the body of teachers and administrators at a school;

‘the dean addressed the letter to the entire staff of the university’;

Schoolverb

(transitive) To educate, teach, or train (often, but not necessarily, in a school.)

‘Many future prime ministers were schooled in Eton.’;

Facultynoun

an inherent mental or physical power

‘her critical faculties’; ‘the faculty of sight’;

Schoolverb

(transitive) To defeat emphatically, to teach an opponent a harsh lesson.

Facultynoun

an aptitude for doing something

‘his faculty for taking the initiative’;

Schoolverb

(transitive) To control, or compose, one's expression.

‘She took care to school her expression, not giving away any of her feelings.’;

Facultynoun

a group of university departments concerned with a major division of knowledge

‘the Faculty of Arts’; ‘the law faculty’;

Schoolnoun

A shoal; a multitude; as, a school of fish.

Facultynoun

the teaching or research staff of a group of university departments viewed as a body

‘there were then no tenured women on the faculty’;

Schoolnoun

A place for learned intercourse and instruction; an institution for learning; an educational establishment; a place for acquiring knowledge and mental training; as, the school of the prophets.

‘Disputing daily in the school of one Tyrannus.’;

Facultynoun

the members of a particular profession, especially medicine, considered collectively.

Schoolnoun

A place of primary instruction; an establishment for the instruction of children; as, a primary school; a common school; a grammar school.

‘As he sat in the school at his primer.’;

Facultynoun

a licence or authorization from a Church authority

‘the vicar introduced certain ornaments without the necessary faculty to do so’;

Schoolnoun

A session of an institution of instruction.

‘How now, Sir Hugh! No school to-day?’;

Schoolnoun

One of the seminaries for teaching logic, metaphysics, and theology, which were formed in the Middle Ages, and which were characterized by academical disputations and subtilties of reasoning.

‘At Cambridge the philosophy of Descartes was still dominant in the schools.’;

Schoolnoun

The room or hall in English universities where the examinations for degrees and honors are held.

Schoolnoun

An assemblage of scholars; those who attend upon instruction in a school of any kind; a body of pupils.

‘What is the great community of Christians, but one of the innumerable schools in the vast plan which God has instituted for the education of various intelligences?’;

Schoolnoun

The disciples or followers of a teacher; those who hold a common doctrine, or accept the same teachings; a sect or denomination in philosophy, theology, science, medicine, politics, etc.

‘Let no man be less confident in his faith . . . by reason of any difference in the several schools of Christians.’;

Schoolnoun

The canons, precepts, or body of opinion or practice, sanctioned by the authority of a particular class or age; as, he was a gentleman of the old school.

Schoolnoun

Figuratively, any means of knowledge or discipline; as, the school of experience.

Schoolverb

To train in an institution of learning; to educate at a school; to teach.

‘He's gentle, never schooled, and yet learned.’;

Schoolverb

To tutor; to chide and admonish; to reprove; to subject to systematic discipline; to train.

‘It now remains for you to school your child,And ask why God's Anointed be reviled.’; ‘The mother, while loving her child with the intensity of a sole affection, had schooled herself to hope for little other return than the waywardness of an April breeze.’;

Schoolnoun

an educational institution;

‘the school was founded in 1900’;

Schoolnoun

a building where young people receive education;

‘the school was built in 1932’; ‘he walked to school every morning’;

Schoolnoun

the process of being formally educated at a school;

‘what will you do when you finish school?’;

Schoolnoun

an educational institution's faculty and students;

‘the school keeps parents informed’; ‘the whole school turned out for the game’;

Schoolnoun

the period of instruction in a school; the time period when schools is in session;

‘stay after school’; ‘he didn't miss a single day of school’; ‘when the school day was done we would walk home together’;

Schoolnoun

a body of creative artists or writers or thinkers linked by a similar style or by similar teachers;

‘the Venetian school of painting’;

Schoolnoun

a large group of fish;

‘a school of small glittering fish swam by’;

Schoolverb

educate in or as if in a school;

‘The children are schooled at great cost to their parents in private institutions’;

Schoolverb

train to be discriminative in taste or judgment;

‘Cultivate your musical taste’; ‘Train your tastebuds’; ‘She is well schooled in poetry’;

Schoolverb

swim in or form a large group of fish;

‘A cluster of schooling fish was attracted to the bait’;

School

A school is an educational institution designed to provide learning spaces and learning environments for the teaching of students (or ) under the direction of teachers. Most countries have systems of formal education, which is sometimes compulsory.

‘pupils’;

School Illustrations

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons