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Fable vs. Parable

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Fablenoun

A fictitious narrative intended to enforce some useful truth or precept, usually with animals, etc. as characters; an apologue. Prototypically, Aesop's Fables.

Parablenoun

A short narrative illustrating a lesson (usually religious/moral) by comparison or analogy.

‘In the New Testament the parables told by Jesus convey His message, as in "The parable of the prodigal son".’; ‘Catholic sermons normally draw on at least one Biblical lecture, often parables.’;

Fablenoun

Any story told to excite wonder; common talk; the theme of talk.

Parableverb

(transitive) To represent by parable.

Fablenoun

Fiction; untruth; falsehood.

Parableadjective

(obsolete) That can easily be prepared or procured; obtainable.

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Fablenoun

The plot, story, or connected series of events forming the subject of an epic or dramatic poem.

Parableadjective

Procurable.

Fableverb

To compose fables; hence, to write or speak fiction; to write or utter what is not true.

Parablenoun

A comparison; a similitude; specifically, a short fictitious narrative of something which might really occur in life or nature, by means of which a moral is drawn; as, the parables of Christ.

‘Declare unto us the parable of the tares.’;

Fableverb

To make up; to devise, and speak of, as true or real; to tell of falsely; to recount in the form of a fable.

Parableverb

To represent by parable.

‘Which by the ancient sages was thus parabled.’;

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Fablenoun

A Feigned story or tale, intended to instruct or amuse; a fictitious narration intended to enforce some useful truth or precept; an apologue. See the Note under Apologue.

‘Jotham's fable of the trees is the oldest extant.’;

Parablenoun

a short moral story (often with animal characters)

Fablenoun

The plot, story, or connected series of events, forming the subject of an epic or dramatic poem.

‘The moral is the first business of the poet; this being formed, he contrives such a design or fable as may be most suitable to the moral.’;

Parablenoun

(New Testament) any of the stories told by Jesus to convey his religious message;

‘the parable of the prodigal son’;

Fablenoun

Any story told to excite wonder; common talk; the theme of talk.

‘We grewThe fable of the city where we dwelt.’;

Parablenoun

a simple story used to illustrate a moral or spiritual lesson, as told by Jesus in the Gospels

‘the parable of the blind men and the elephant’; ‘a modern-day parable’;

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Fablenoun

Fiction; untruth; falsehood.

‘It would look like a fable to report that this gentleman gives away a great fortune by secret methods.’;

Parable

A parable is a succinct, didactic story, in prose or verse, that illustrates one or more instructive lessons or principles. It differs from a fable in that fables employ animals, plants, inanimate objects, or forces of nature as characters, whereas parables have human characters.

Fableverb

To compose fables; hence, to write or speak fiction ; to write or utter what is not true.

‘Vain now the tales which fabling poets tell.’; ‘He fables, yet speaks truth.’;

Fableverb

To feign; to invent; to devise, and speak of, as true or real; to tell of falsely.

‘The hell thou fablest.’;

Fablenoun

a deliberately false or improbable account

Fablenoun

a short moral story (often with animal characters)

Fablenoun

a story about mythical or supernatural beings or events

Fable

Fable is a literary genre: a succinct fictional story, in prose or verse, that features animals, legendary creatures, plants, inanimate objects, or forces of nature that are anthropomorphized, and that illustrates or leads to a particular moral lesson (a ), which may at the end be added explicitly as a concise maxim or saying. A fable differs from a parable in that the latter excludes animals, plants, inanimate objects, and forces of nature as actors that assume speech or other powers of humankind.

‘moral’;

Fable Illustrations

Parable Illustrations

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