VS.

Epigram vs. Epigraph

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Epigramnoun

(obsolete) An inscription in stone.

Epigraphnoun

An inscription, especially on a building.

Epigramnoun

A brief but witty saying.

Epigraphnoun

A literary quotation placed at the beginning of a book or other text.

Epigramnoun

A short, witty or pithy poem.

Epigraphnoun

The set of all points lying on or above the function's graph.

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Epigramnoun

A short poem treating concisely and pointedly of a single thought or event. The modern epigram is so contrived as to surprise the reader with a witticism or ingenious turn of thought, and is often satirical in character.

‘Dost thou think I care for a satire or an epigram?’;

Epigraphverb

(transitive) To provide (a literary work) with an epigraph.

Epigramnoun

An effusion of wit; a bright thought tersely and sharply expressed, whether in verse or prose.

Epigraphnoun

Any inscription set upon a building; especially, one which has to do with the building itself, its founding or dedication.

Epigramnoun

The style of the epigram.

‘Antithesis, i. e., bilateral stroke, is the soul of epigram in its later and technical signification.’;

Epigraphnoun

A citation from some author, or a sentence framed for the purpose, placed at the beginning of a work or of its separate divisions; a motto.

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Epigramnoun

a witty saying

Epigraphnoun

a quotation at the beginning of some piece of writing

Epigram

An epigram is a brief, interesting, memorable, and sometimes surprising or satirical statement. The word is derived from the Greek ἐπίγραμμα epigramma from ἐπιγράφειν epigraphein , and the literary device has been employed for over two millennia.

‘inscription’; ‘to write on, to inscribe’;

Epigraphnoun

an engraved inscription

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