VS.

Drag vs. Drift

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Dragnoun

(uncountable) Resistance of the air (or some other fluid) to something moving through it.

‘When designing cars, manufacturers have to take drag into consideration.’;

Driftnoun

(physical) Movement; that which moves or is moved.

Dragnoun

The bottom part of a sand casting mold.

Driftnoun

(obsolete) A driving; a violent movement.

Dragnoun

(countable) A device dragged along the bottom of a body of water in search of something, e.g. a dead body, or in fishing.

Driftnoun

Course or direction along which anything is driven; setting.

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Dragnoun

A puff on a cigarette or joint.

Driftnoun

That which is driven, forced, or urged along.

Dragnoun

Someone or something that is annoying or frustrating, or disappointing; an obstacle to progress or enjoyment.

‘Travelling to work in the rush hour is a real drag.’;

Driftnoun

Anything driven at random.

Dragnoun

A type of horse-drawn carriage.

Driftnoun

A mass of matter which has been driven or forced onward together in a body, or thrown together in a heap, etc., especially by wind or water.

‘a drift of snow, of ice, of sand, etc.’;

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Dragnoun

Street, as in 'main drag'.

Driftnoun

The distance through which a current flows in a given time.

Dragnoun

(countable) The scent-path left by dragging a fox, for training hounds to follow scents.

‘to run a drag’;

Driftnoun

A drove or flock, as of cattle, sheep, birds.

Dragnoun

A large amount of backspin on the cue ball, causing the cue ball to slow down.

Driftnoun

A collection of loose earth and rocks, or boulders, which have been distributed over large portions of the earth's surface, especially in latitudes north of forty degrees, by the retreat of continental glaciers, such as that which buries former river valleys and creates young river valleys.

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Dragnoun

A heavy harrow for breaking up ground.

Driftnoun

Driftwood included in flotsam washed up onto the beach.

Dragnoun

A kind of sledge for conveying heavy objects; also, a kind of low car or handcart.

‘a stone drag’;

Driftnoun

The act or motion of drifting; the force which impels or drives; an overpowering influence or impulse.

Dragnoun

(metallurgy) The bottom part of a flask or mould, the upper part being the cope.

Driftnoun

A place (a ford) along a river where the water is shallow enough to permit crossing to the opposite side.

Dragnoun

(masonry) A steel instrument for completing the dressing of soft stone.

Driftnoun

The tendency of an act, argument, course of conduct, or the like; object aimed at or intended; intention; hence, also, import or meaning of a sentence or discourse; aim.

Dragnoun

(nautical) The difference between the speed of a screw steamer under sail and that of the screw when the ship outruns the screw; or between the propulsive effects of the different floats of a paddle wheel.

Driftnoun

(architecture) The horizontal thrust or pressure of an arch or vault upon the abutments.

Dragnoun

Anything towed in the water to retard a ship's progress, or to keep her head up to the wind; especially, a canvas bag with a hooped mouth (drag sail), so used.

Driftnoun

(handiwork) A tool.

Dragnoun

A skid or shoe for retarding the motion of a carriage wheel.

Driftnoun

A slightly tapered tool of steel for enlarging or shaping a hole in metal, by being forced or driven into or through it; a broach.

Dragnoun

Motion affected with slowness and difficulty, as if clogged.

Driftnoun

A tool used to pack down the composition contained in a rocket, or like firework.

Dragnoun

witch house music

Driftnoun

A tool used to insert or extract a removable pin made of metal or hardwood, for the purpose of aligning and/or securing two pieces of material together.

Dragnoun

The last position in a line of hikers.

Driftnoun

A deviation from the line of fire, peculiar to oblong projectiles.

Dragnoun

The act of suppressing wind flow to slow an aircraft in flight, as by use of flaps when landing.

Driftnoun

(mining) A passage driven or cut between shaft and shaft; a driftway; a small subterranean gallery; an adit or tunnel.

Dragnoun

Women's clothing worn by men for the purpose of entertainment.

‘He performed in drag.’;

Driftnoun

(nautical) Movement.

Dragnoun

Any type of clothing or costume associated with a particular occupation or subculture.

‘corporate drag’;

Driftnoun

The angle which the line of a ship's motion makes with the meridian, in drifting.

Dragverb

(transitive) To pull along a surface or through a medium, sometimes with difficulty.

Driftnoun

The distance a vessel is carried off from her desired course by the wind, currents, or other causes.

Dragverb

(intransitive) To move slowly.

‘Time seems to drag when you’re waiting for a bus.’;

Driftnoun

The place in a deep-waisted vessel where the sheer is raised and the rail is cut off, and usually terminated with a scroll, or driftpiece.

Dragverb

To act or proceed slowly or without enthusiasm; to be reluctant.

Driftnoun

The distance between the two blocks of a tackle.

Dragverb

To move onward heavily, laboriously, or slowly; to advance with weary effort; to go on lingeringly.

Driftnoun

The difference between the size of a bolt and the hole into which it is driven, or between the circumference of a hoop and that of the mast on which it is to be driven.

Dragverb

To draw along (something burdensome); hence, to pass in pain or with difficulty.

Driftnoun

(cricket) A sideways movement of the ball through the air, when bowled by a spin bowler.

Dragverb

To serve as a clog or hindrance; to hold back.

Driftnoun

Slow, cumulative change.

‘genetic drift’;

Dragverb

(computing) To move (an item) on the computer display by means of a mouse or other input device.

‘Drag the file into the window to open it.’;

Driftverb

(intransitive) To move slowly, especially pushed by currents of water, air, etc.

‘The boat drifted away from the shore.’; ‘The balloon was drifting in the breeze.’;

Dragverb

(chiefly of a vehicle) To inadvertently rub or scrape on a surface.

‘The car was so low to the ground that its muffler was dragging on a speed bump.’;

Driftverb

(intransitive) To move haphazardly without any destination.

‘He drifted from town to town, never settling down.’;

Dragverb

(soccer) To hit or kick off target.

Driftverb

(intransitive) To deviate gently from the intended direction of travel.

‘This car tends to drift left at high speeds.’;

Dragverb

To fish with a dragnet.

Driftverb

(transitive) To drive or carry, as currents do a floating body.

Dragverb

To search for something, as a lost object or body, by dragging something along the bottom of a body of water.

Driftverb

(transitive) To drive into heaps.

‘A current of wind drifts snow or sand’;

Dragverb

To break (land) by drawing a drag or harrow over it; to harrow.

Driftverb

(intransitive) To accumulate in heaps by the force of wind; to be driven into heaps.

‘Snow or sand drifts.’;

Dragverb

(figurative) To search exhaustively, as if with a dragnet.

Driftverb

To make a drift; to examine a vein or ledge for the purpose of ascertaining the presence of metals or ores; to follow a vein; to prospect.

Dragverb

(slang) To roast, say negative things about, or call attention to the flaws of (someone).

‘You just drag him 'cause he's got more money than you.’;

Driftverb

To enlarge or shape, as a hole, with a drift.

Dragverb

To perform as a drag queen or drag king.

Driftverb

To oversteer a vehicle, causing loss of traction, while maintaining control from entry to exit of a corner. See Drifting (motorsport).

Dragnoun

A confection; a comfit; a drug.

Driftnoun

A driving; a violent movement.

‘The dragon drew him [self] away with drift of his wings.’;

Dragnoun

The act of dragging; anything which is dragged.

Driftnoun

The act or motion of drifting; the force which impels or drives; an overpowering influence or impulse.

‘A bad man, being under the drift of any passion, will follow the impulse of it till something interpose.’;

Dragnoun

A net, or an apparatus, to be drawn along the bottom under water, as in fishing, searching for drowned persons, etc.

Driftnoun

Course or direction along which anything is driven; setting.

Dragnoun

A kind of sledge for conveying heavy bodies; also, a kind of low car or handcart; as, a stone drag.

Driftnoun

The tendency of an act, argument, course of conduct, or the like; object aimed at or intended; intention; hence, also, import or meaning of a sentence or discourse; aim.

‘He has made the drift of the whole poem a compliment on his country in general.’; ‘Now thou knowest my drift.’;

Dragnoun

A heavy coach with seats on top; also, a heavy carriage.

Driftnoun

That which is driven, forced, or urged along

‘Drifts of rising dust involve the sky.’; ‘We got the brig a good bed in the rushing drift [of ice].’;

Dragnoun

A heavy harrow, for breaking up ground.

Driftnoun

A drove or flock, as of cattle, sheep, birds.

‘Cattle coming over the bridge (with their great drift doing much damage to the high ways).’;

Dragnoun

Anything towed in the water to retard a ship's progress, or to keep her head up to the wind; esp., a canvas bag with a hooped mouth, so used. See Drag sail (below).

‘My lectures were only a pleasure to me, and no drag.’;

Driftnoun

The horizontal thrust or pressure of an arch or vault upon the abutments.

Dragnoun

Motion affected with slowness and difficulty, as if clogged.

Driftnoun

A collection of loose earth and rocks, or boulders, which have been distributed over large portions of the earth's surface, especially in latitudes north of forty degrees, by the agency of ice.

Dragnoun

The bottom part of a flask or mold, the upper part being the cope.

Driftnoun

In South Africa, a ford in a river.

Dragnoun

A steel instrument for completing the dressing of soft stone.

Driftnoun

A slightly tapered tool of steel for enlarging or shaping a hole in metal, by being forced or driven into or through it; a broach.

Dragnoun

The difference between the speed of a screw steamer under sail and that of the screw when the ship outruns the screw; or between the propulsive effects of the different floats of a paddle wheel. See Citation under Drag, v. i., 3.

Driftnoun

A tool used in driving down compactly the composition contained in a rocket, or like firework.

Dragverb

To draw slowly or heavily onward; to pull along the ground by main force; to haul; to trail; - applied to drawing heavy or resisting bodies or those inapt for drawing, with labor, along the ground or other surface; as, to drag stone or timber; to drag a net in fishing.

‘Dragged by the cords which through his feet were thrust.’; ‘The grossness of his nature will have weight to drag thee down.’; ‘A needless Alexandrine ends the songThat, like a wounded snake, drags its slow length along.’;

Driftnoun

A passage driven or cut between shaft and shaft; a driftway; a small subterranean gallery; an adit or tunnel.

Dragverb

To break, as land, by drawing a drag or harrow over it; to harrow; to draw a drag along the bottom of, as a stream or other water; hence, to search, as by means of a drag.

‘Then while I dragged my brains for such a song.’;

Driftnoun

The distance through which a current flows in a given time.

Dragverb

To draw along, as something burdensome; hence, to pass in pain or with difficulty.

‘Have dragged a lingering life.’;

Driftnoun

The difference between the size of a bolt and the hole into which it is driven, or between the circumference of a hoop and that of the mast on which it is to be driven.

Dragverb

To be drawn along, as a rope or dress, on the ground; to trail; to be moved onward along the ground, or along the bottom of the sea, as an anchor that does not hold.

Driftnoun

One of the slower movements of oceanic circulation; a general tendency of the water, subject to occasional or frequent diversion or reversal by the wind; as, the easterly drift of the North Pacific.

Dragverb

To move onward heavily, laboriously, or slowly; to advance with weary effort; to go on lingeringly.

‘The day drags through, though storms keep out the sun.’; ‘Long, open panegyric drags at best.’;

Driftnoun

The horizontal component of the pressure of the air on the sustaining surfaces of a flying machine. The lift is the corresponding vertical component, which sustains the machine in the air.

Dragverb

To serve as a clog or hindrance; to hold back.

‘A propeller is said to drag when the sails urge the vessel faster than the revolutions of the screw can propel her.’;

Driftverb

To float or be driven along by, or as by, a current of water or air; as, the ship drifted astern; a raft drifted ashore; the balloon drifts slowly east.

‘We drifted o'er the harbor bar.’;

Dragverb

To fish with a dragnet.

Driftverb

To accumulate in heaps by the force of wind; to be driven into heaps; as, snow or sand drifts.

Dragnoun

the phenomenon of resistance to motion through a fluid

Driftverb

to make a drift; to examine a vein or ledge for the purpose of ascertaining the presence of metals or ores; to follow a vein; to prospect.

Dragnoun

something that slows or delays progress;

‘taxation is a drag on the economy’; ‘too many laws are a drag on the use of new land’;

Driftverb

To drive or carry, as currents do a floating body.

Dragnoun

something tedious and boring;

‘peeling potatoes is a drag’;

Driftverb

To drive into heaps; as, a current of wind drifts snow or sand.

Dragnoun

clothing that is conventionally worn by the opposite sex (especially women's clothing when worn by a man);

‘he went to the party dressed in drag’; ‘the waitresses looked like missionaries in drag’;

Driftverb

To enlarge or shape, as a hole, with a drift.

Dragnoun

a slow inhalation (as of tobacco smoke);

‘he took a puff on his pipe’; ‘he took a drag on his cigarette and expelled the smoke slowly’;

Driftadjective

That causes drifting or that is drifted; movable by wind or currents; as, drift currents; drift ice; drift mud.

Dragnoun

the act of dragging (pulling with force);

‘the drag up the hill exhausted him’;

Driftnoun

a force that moves something along

Dragverb

pull, as against a resistance;

‘He dragged the big suitcase behind him’; ‘These worries were dragging at him’;

Driftnoun

the gradual departure from an intended course due to external influences (as a ship or plane)

Dragverb

draw slowly or heavily;

‘haul stones’; ‘haul nets’;

Driftnoun

a process of linguistic change over a period of time

Dragverb

force into some kind of situation, condition, or course of action;

‘They were swept up by the events’; ‘don't drag me into this business’;

Driftnoun

something that is heaped up by the wind or by water currents

Dragverb

move slowly and as if with great effort

Driftnoun

a general tendency to change (as of opinion);

‘not openly liberal but that is the trend of the book’; ‘a broad movement of the electorate to the right’;

Dragverb

to lag or linger behind;

‘But in so many other areas we still are dragging’;

Driftnoun

general meaning or tenor;

‘caught the drift of the conversation’;

Dragverb

suck in or take (air);

‘draw a deep breath’; ‘draw on a cigarette’;

Driftnoun

a horizontal (or nearly horizontal) passageway in a mine;

‘they dug a drift parallel with the vein’;

Dragverb

use a computer mouse to move icons on the screen and select commands from a menu;

‘drag this icon to the lower right hand corner of the screen’;

Driftverb

be in motion due to some air or water current;

‘The leaves were blowing in the wind’; ‘the boat drifted on the lake’; ‘The sailboat was adrift on the open sea’; ‘the shipwrecked boat drifted away from the shore’;

Dragverb

walk without lifting the feet

Driftverb

wander from a direct course or at random;

‘The child strayed from the path and her parents lost sight of her’; ‘don't drift from the set course’;

Dragverb

search (as the bottom of a body of water) for something valuable or lost

Driftverb

move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment;

‘The gypsies roamed the woods’; ‘roving vagabonds’; ‘the wandering Jew’; ‘The cattle roam across the prairie’; ‘the laborers drift from one town to the next’; ‘They rolled from town to town’;

Dragverb

persuade to come away from something attractive or interesting;

‘He dragged me away from the television set’;

Driftverb

vary or move from a fixed point or course;

‘stock prices are drifting higher’;

Dragverb

proceed for an extended period of time;

‘The speech dragged on for two hours’;

Driftverb

live unhurriedly, irresponsibly, or freely;

‘My son drifted around for years in California before going to law school’;

Dragverb

pull (someone or something) along forcefully, roughly, or with difficulty

‘we dragged the boat up the beach’;

Driftverb

move in an unhurried fashion;

‘The unknown young man drifted among the invited guests’;

Dragverb

take (someone) to or from a place or event, despite their reluctance

‘my girlfriend is dragging me off to Rhodes for a week’;

Driftverb

cause to be carried by a current;

‘drift the boats downstream’;

Dragverb

go somewhere wearily, reluctantly, or with difficulty

‘I have to drag myself out of bed each day’;

Driftverb

drive slowly and far afield for grazing;

‘drift the cattle herds westwards’;

Dragverb

move (an image or highlighted text) across a computer screen using a tool such as a mouse

‘you can move the icons into this group by dragging them in with the mouse’;

Driftverb

be subject to fluctuation;

‘The stock market drifted upward’;

Dragverb

(of a person's clothes or an animal's tail) trail along the ground

‘the nuns walked in meditation, their habits dragging on the grassy verge’;

Driftverb

be piled up in banks or heaps by the force of wind or a current;

‘snow drifting several feet high’; ‘sand drifting like snow’;

Dragverb

catch hold of and pull (something)

‘desperately, Jinny dragged at his arm’;

Driftverb

be carried slowly by a current of air or water

‘the cabin cruiser started to drift downstream’; ‘excited voices drifted down the hall’;

Dragverb

(of a ship) trail (an anchor) along the seabed, drifting in the process

‘the coaster was dragging her anchor in St Ives Bay’; ‘the anchor did not hold and they dragged further through the water’;

Driftverb

walk slowly, aimlessly, or casually

‘people began to drift away’;

Dragverb

(of an anchor) fail to hold, causing a ship or boat to drift

‘his anchor had dragged and he found himself sailing out to sea’;

Driftverb

move passively, aimlessly, or involuntarily into a certain situation or condition

‘I was drifting off to sleep’;

Dragverb

search the bottom of (a river, lake, or the sea) with grapnels or nets

‘frogmen had dragged the local river’;

Driftverb

(of a person or their attention) digress or stray to another subject

‘I noticed my audience's attention drifting’;

Dragverb

(of time) pass slowly and tediously

‘the day dragged—eventually it was time for bed’;

Driftverb

(especially of snow or leaves) be blown into heaps by the wind

‘fallen leaves start to drift in the gutters’;

Dragverb

(of a process or situation) continue at tedious and unnecessary length

‘the dispute between the two families dragged on for some years’;

Driftnoun

a continuous slow movement from one place to another

‘there was a drift to the towns’;

Dragverb

protract something unnecessarily

‘he dragged out the process of serving them’;

Driftnoun

the deviation of a vessel, aircraft, or projectile from its intended or expected course as the result of currents or winds

‘the pilot had not noticed any appreciable drift’;

Dragnoun

the action of pulling something forcefully or with difficulty

‘the drag of the current’;

Driftnoun

a steady movement or development from one thing towards another that is perceived as unwelcome

‘the drift towards a more repressive style of policing’;

Dragnoun

the longitudinal retarding force exerted by air or other fluid surrounding a moving object

‘the coating reduces aerodynamic drag’;

Driftnoun

a state of inaction or indecision

‘after so much drift, any expression of enthusiasm is welcome’;

Dragnoun

a person or thing that impedes progress or development

‘Larry was turning out to be a drag on her career’;

Driftnoun

a controlled skid, used in taking bends at high speeds.

Dragnoun

unnatural motion of a fishing fly caused by the pull of the line.

Driftnoun

the general intention or meaning of an argument or someone's remarks

‘maybe I'm too close to the forest to see the trees, if you catch my drift’; ‘he didn't understand much Greek, but he got her drift’;

Dragnoun

an iron shoe that can be applied as a brake to the wheel of a cart or wagon.

Driftnoun

a large mass of snow, leaves, or other material piled up or carried along by the wind

‘four sheep were dug out of the drift’;

Dragnoun

a boring or tiresome person or thing

‘working nine to five can be a drag’;

Driftnoun

glacial and fluvioglacial deposits left by retreating ice sheets.

Dragnoun

an act of inhaling smoke from a cigarette

‘he took a long drag on his cigarette’;

Driftnoun

a large spread of flowering plants growing together

‘a drift of daffodils’;

Dragnoun

clothing more conventionally worn by the opposite sex, especially women's clothes worn by a man

‘a fashion show, complete with men in drag’;

Driftnoun

a horizontal or inclined passage following a mineral vein or coal seam

‘the drift led to another smaller ore chamber’;

Dragnoun

a street or road

‘the main drag is wide but there are few vehicles’;

Driftnoun

an act of driving cattle or sheep.

Dragnoun

a thing that is pulled along the ground or through water.

Driftnoun

an act of herding cattle within a forest to a particular place on an appointed day in order to determine ownership or to levy fines.

Dragnoun

a harrow used for breaking up the surface of land.

Driftnoun

a ford.

Dragnoun

an apparatus for dredging or for recovering objects from the bottom of a river or lake.

Dragnoun

another term for dragnet

Dragnoun

a strong-smelling lure drawn before hounds as a substitute for a fox.

Dragnoun

a hunt using a drag lure.

Dragnoun

influence over other people

‘they had the education but they didn't have the drag’;

Dragnoun

one of the basic patterns (rudiments) of drumming, consisting of a stroke preceded by two grace notes usually played with the other stick.

Dragnoun

short for drag race

Dragnoun

a private vehicle like a stagecoach, drawn by four horses.

Dragnoun

a car

‘a stately great drag with a smart chauffeur’;

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