VS.

Domain vs. Range

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Domainnoun

A geographic area owned or controlled by a single person or organization.

‘The king ruled his domain harshly.’;

Rangenoun

A line or series of mountains, buildings, etc.

Domainnoun

A field or sphere of activity, influence or expertise.

‘Dealing with complaints isn't really my domain: get in touch with customer services.’; ‘His domain is English history.’;

Rangenoun

A fireplace; a fire or other cooking apparatus; now specifically, a large cooking stove with many hotplates.

Domainnoun

A group of related items, topics, or subjects.

Rangenoun

Selection, array.

‘We sell a wide range of cars.’;

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Domainnoun

(mathematics) The set of all possible mathematical entities (points) where a given function is defined.

Rangenoun

An area for practicing shooting at targets.

Domainnoun

The set of input (argument) values for which a function is defined.

Rangenoun

An area for military training or equipment testing.

Domainnoun

(mathematics) A ring with no zero divisors; that is, in which no product of nonzero elements is zero.

‘integral domain’;

Rangenoun

The distance from a person or sensor to an object, target, emanation, or event.

‘We could see the ship at a range of five miles.’; ‘One can use the speed of sound to estimate the range of a lightning flash.’;

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Domainnoun

An open and connected set in some topology. For example, the interval (0,1) as a subset of the real numbers.

Rangenoun

Maximum distance of capability (of a weapon, radio, detector, fuel supply, etc.).

‘This missile's range is 500 kilometres.’;

Domainnoun

Any DNS domain name, particularly one which has been delegated and has become representative of the delegated domain name and its subdomains.

Rangenoun

An area of open, often unfenced, grazing land.

Domainnoun

A collection of DNS or DNS-like domain names consisting of a delegated domain name and all its subdomains.

Rangenoun

Extent or space taken in by anything excursive; compass or extent of excursion; reach; scope.

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Domainnoun

(computing) A collection of information having to do with a domain, the computers named in the domain, and the network on which the computers named in the domain reside.

Rangenoun

(mathematics) The set of values (points) which a function can obtain.

Domainnoun

(computing) The collection of computers identified by a domain's domain names.

Rangenoun

(statistics) The length of the smallest interval which contains all the data in a sample; the difference between the largest and smallest observations in the sample.

Domainnoun

(physics) A small region of a magnetic material with a consistent magnetization direction.

Rangenoun

The defensive area that a player can cover.

‘Jones has good range for a big man.’;

Domainnoun

(computing) Such a region used as a data storage element in a bubble memory.

Rangenoun

(music) The scale of all the tones a voice or an instrument can produce.

Domainnoun

(data processing) A form of technical metadata that represent the type of a data item, its characteristics, name, and usage.

Rangenoun

(ecology) The geographical area or zone where a species is normally naturally found.

Domainnoun

(taxonomy) The highest rank in the classification of organisms, above kingdom; in the three-domain system, one of the taxa Bacteria, Archaea, or Eukaryota.

Rangenoun

(programming) A sequential list of values specified by an iterator.

‘calls the given function on each value in the input range.’;

Domainnoun

(biochemistry) A folded section of a protein molecule that has a discrete function.

Rangenoun

An aggregate of individuals in one rank or degree; an order; a class.

Domainnoun

Dominion; empire; authority.

Rangenoun

(obsolete) The step of a ladder; a rung.

Domainnoun

The territory over which dominion or authority is exerted; the possessions of a sovereign or commonwealth, or the like. Also used figuratively.

‘The domain of authentic history.’; ‘The domain over which the poetic spirit ranges.’;

Rangenoun

A bolting sieve to sift meal.

Domainnoun

Landed property; estate; especially, the land about the mansion house of a lord, and in his immediate occupancy; demesne.

Rangenoun

A wandering or roving; a going to and fro; an excursion; a ramble; an expedition.

Domainnoun

Ownership of land; an estate or patrimony which one has in his own right; absolute proprietorship; paramount or sovereign ownership.

Rangenoun

In the public land system, a row or line of townships lying between two succession meridian lines six miles apart.

Domainnoun

the set of values which the independent variable of a function may take. Contrasted to range, which is the set of values taken by the dependent variable.

Rangenoun

The scope of something, the extent which something covers or includes.

Domainnoun

a connected set of points, also called a region.

Rangenoun

The variety of roles that an actor can play in a satisfactory way.

‘By playing in comedies as well as in dramas he has proved his range as an actor.’; ‘By playing in comedies as well as in dramas he has proved his acting range.’;

Domainnoun

a region within a ferromagnetic material, composed of a number of atoms whose magnetic poles are pointed in the same direction, and which may move together in a coordinated manner when disturbed, as by heating. The direction of polarity of adjacent domains may be different, but may be aligned by a strong external magnetic field.

Rangeverb

(intransitive) To travel over (an area, etc); to roam, wander.

Domainnoun

an address within the internet computer network, which may be a single computer, a network of computers, or one of a number of accounts on a multiuser computer. The domain specifies the location (host computer) to which communications on the internet are directed. Each domain has a corresponding 32-bit number usually represented by four numbers separated by periods, as 128.32.282.56. Each domain may also have an alphabetical name, usually composed of a name plus an extension separated by a period, as worldsoul.org; the alphabetical name is referred to as a domain name.

Rangeverb

(transitive) To rove over or through.

‘to range the fields’;

Domainnoun

the three-dimensional structure within an immunoglobulin which is formed by one of the homology regions of a heavy or light chain.

Rangeverb

To exercise the power of something over something else; to cause to submit to, over.

Domainnoun

the field of knowledge, expertise, or interest of a person; as, he had a limited domain of discourse; I can't comment on that, it's outside my domain.

Rangeverb

(transitive) To bring (something) into a specified position or relationship (especially, of opposition) with something else.

Domainnoun

a particular environment or walk of life.

Rangeverb

}} Of a variable, to be able to take any of the values in a specified range.

‘The variable x ranges over all real values from 0 to 10.’;

Domainnoun

people in general; especially a distinctive group of people with some shared interest.

Rangeverb

(transitive) To classify.

‘to range plants and animals in genera and species’;

Domainnoun

a particular environment or walk of life;

‘his social sphere is limited’; ‘it was a closed area of employment’; ‘he's out of my orbit’;

Rangeverb

(intransitive) To form a line or a row.

‘The front of a house ranges with the street.’;

Domainnoun

territory over which rule or control is exercised;

‘his domain extended into Europe’; ‘he made it the law of the land’;

Rangeverb

(intransitive) To be placed in order; to be ranked; to admit of arrangement or classification; to rank.

Domainnoun

the set of values of the independent variable for which a function is defined

Rangeverb

(transitive) To set in a row, or in rows; to place in a regular line or lines, or in ranks; to dispose in the proper order.

Domainnoun

people in general; especially a distinctive group of people with some shared interest;

‘the Western world’;

Rangeverb

(transitive) To place among others in a line, row, or order, as in the ranks of an army; usually, reflexively and figuratively, to espouse a cause, to join a party, etc.

Domainnoun

a knowledge domain that you are interested in or are communicating about;

‘it was a limited domain of discourse’; ‘here we enter the region of opinion’; ‘the realm of the occult’;

Rangeverb

(biology) To be native to, or live in, a certain district or region.

‘The peba ranges from Texas to Paraguay.’;

Domainnoun

an area of territory owned or controlled by a particular ruler or government

‘the French domains of the Plantagenets’;

Rangeverb

To separate into parts; to sift.

Domainnoun

a specified sphere of activity or knowledge

‘the country's isolation in the domain of sport’;

Rangeverb

To sail or pass in a direction parallel to or near.

‘to range the coast’;

Domainnoun

a distinct subset of the Internet with addresses sharing a common suffix or under the control of a particular organization or individual.

Rangeverb

(baseball) Of a player, to travel a significant distance for a defensive play.

Domainnoun

a discrete region of magnetism in ferromagnetic material.

Rangeverb

To set in a row, or in rows; to place in a regular line or lines, or in ranks; to dispose in the proper order; to rank; as, to range soldiers in line.

‘Maccabeus ranged his army by bands.’;

Domainnoun

the set of possible values of the independent variable or variables of a function.

Rangeverb

To place (as a single individual) among others in a line, row, or order, as in the ranks of an army; - usually, reflexively and figuratively, (in the sense) to espouse a cause, to join a party, etc.

‘It would be absurd in me to range myself on the side of the Duke of Bedford and the corresponding society.’;

Domainnoun

a distinct region of a complex molecule or structure.

Rangeverb

To separate into parts; to sift.

Rangeverb

To dispose in a classified or in systematic order; to arrange regularly; as, to range plants and animals in genera and species.

Rangeverb

To rove over or through; as, to range the fields.

‘Teach him to range the ditch, and force the brake.’;

Rangeverb

To sail or pass in a direction parallel to or near; as, to range the coast.

Rangeverb

To be native to, or to live in; to frequent.

Rangeverb

To rove at large; to wander without restraint or direction; to roam.

‘Like a ranging spaniel that barks at every bird he sees.’;

Rangeverb

To have range; to change or differ within limits; to be capable of projecting, or to admit of being projected, especially as to horizontal distance; as, the temperature ranged through seventy degrees Fahrenheit; the gun ranges three miles; the shot ranged four miles.

Rangeverb

To be placed in order; to be ranked; to admit of arrangement or classification; to rank.

‘And range with humble livers in content.’;

Rangeverb

To have a certain direction; to correspond in direction; to be or keep in a corresponding line; to trend or run; - often followed by with; as, the front of a house ranges with the street; to range along the coast.

‘Which way the forests range.’;

Rangeverb

To be native to, or live in, a certain district or region; as, the peba ranges from Texas to Paraguay.

Rangenoun

A series of things in a line; a row; a rank; as, a range of buildings; a range of mountains.

Rangenoun

An aggregate of individuals in one rank or degree; an order; a class.

‘The next range of beings above him are the immaterial intelligences.’;

Rangenoun

The step of a ladder; a rung.

Rangenoun

A kitchen grate.

‘He was bid at his first coming to take off the range, and let down the cinders.’;

Rangenoun

An extended cooking apparatus of cast iron, set in brickwork, and affording conveniences for various ways of cooking; also, a kind of cooking stove.

Rangenoun

A bolting sieve to sift meal.

Rangenoun

A wandering or roving; a going to and fro; an excursion; a ramble; an expedition.

‘He may take a range all the world over.’;

Rangenoun

That which may be ranged over; place or room for excursion; especially, a region of country in which cattle or sheep may wander and pasture.

Rangenoun

Extent or space taken in by anything excursive; compass or extent of excursion; reach; scope; discursive power; as, the range of one's voice, or authority.

‘Far as creation's ample range extends.’; ‘The range and compass of Hammond's knowledge filled the whole circle of the arts.’; ‘A man has not enough range of thought.’;

Rangenoun

The region within which a plant or animal naturally lives.

Rangenoun

The horizontal distance to which a shot or other projectile is carried.

Rangenoun

In the public land system of the United States, a row or line of townships lying between two successive meridian lines six miles apart.

Rangenoun

See Range of cable, below.

Rangenoun

an area in which something acts or operates or has power or control:

‘the range of a supersonic jet’; ‘the ambit of municipal legislation’; ‘within the compass of this article’; ‘within the scope of an investigation’; ‘outside the reach of the law’; ‘in the political orbit of a world power’;

Rangenoun

the limits within which something can be effective;

‘range of motion’; ‘he was beyond the reach of their fire’;

Rangenoun

a large tract of grassy open land on which livestock can graze;

‘they used to drive the cattle across the open range every spring’; ‘he dreamed of a home on the range’;

Rangenoun

a series of hills or mountains;

‘the valley was between two ranges of hills’; ‘the plains lay just beyond the mountain range’;

Rangenoun

a place for shooting (firing or driving) projectiles of various kinds;

‘the army maintains a missile range in the desert’; ‘any good golf club will have a range where you can practice’;

Rangenoun

the limits of the values a function can take;

‘the range of this function is the interval from 0 to 1’;

Rangenoun

a variety of different things or activities;

‘he answered a range of questions’; ‘he was impressed by the range and diversity of the collection’;

Rangenoun

the limit of capability;

‘within the compass of education’;

Rangenoun

a kitchen appliance used for cooking food;

‘dinner was already on the stove’;

Rangeverb

change or be different within limits;

‘Estimates for the losses in the earthquake range as high as $2 billion’; ‘Interest rates run from 5 to 10 percent’; ‘The instruments ranged from tuba to cymbals’; ‘My students range from very bright to dull’;

Rangeverb

move about aimlessly or without any destination, often in search of food or employment;

‘The gypsies roamed the woods’; ‘roving vagabonds’; ‘the wandering Jew’; ‘The cattle roam across the prairie’; ‘the laborers drift from one town to the next’; ‘They rolled from town to town’;

Rangeverb

have a range; be capable of projecting over a certain distance, as of a gun;

‘This gun ranges over two miles’;

Rangeverb

range or extend over; occupy a certain area;

‘The plants straddle the entire state’;

Rangeverb

lay out in a line

Rangeverb

feed as in a meadow or pasture;

‘the herd was grazing’;

Rangeverb

let eat;

‘range the animals in the prairie’;

Rangeverb

assign a rank or rating to;

‘how would you rank these students?’; ‘The restaurant is rated highly in the food guide’;

Rangenoun

the area of variation between upper and lower limits on a particular scale

‘grand hotels were outside my price range’; ‘the cost will be in the range of $1–5 million a day’;

Rangenoun

the scope of a person's knowledge or abilities

‘in this film he gave some indication of his range’;

Rangenoun

the compass of a person's voice or a musical instrument

‘she was gifted with an incredible vocal range’;

Rangenoun

the period of time covered by something such as a forecast.

Rangenoun

the area covered by or included in something

‘a guide to the range of debate this issue has generated’;

Rangenoun

the set of values that a given function can take as its argument varies.

Rangenoun

a set of different things of the same general type

‘the company's new carpet range’; ‘the area offers a wide range of activities for the tourist’;

Rangenoun

the distance within which a person can see or hear

‘something lurked just beyond her range of vision’;

Rangenoun

the maximum distance to which a gun will shoot or over which a missile will travel

‘a duck came within range’; ‘these rockets have a range of 30 to 40 miles’;

Rangenoun

the maximum distance at which a radio transmission can be effectively received

‘planets within radio range of Earth’;

Rangenoun

the distance that can be covered by a vehicle or aircraft without refuelling

‘the vans have a range of 125 miles’;

Rangenoun

the distance between a camera and the subject to be photographed

‘handheld shots taken at extreme telephoto ranges can be pretty wobbly affairs’;

Rangenoun

a line or series of mountains or hills

‘a mountain range’;

Rangenoun

mountainous or hilly country

‘no one would know if he had survived to live out his life in the ranges back from the river country’;

Rangenoun

a large area of open land for grazing or hunting

‘on dude ranches, tourists put on crisp new western gear to ride the range’;

Rangenoun

an area of land or sea used as a testing ground for military equipment

‘the cost of dealing with unexploded shells and bombs on former military ranges’;

Rangenoun

an open or enclosed area with targets for shooting practice

‘he went down to the ranges to practise shooting’;

Rangenoun

the area over which a plant or animal is distributed

‘the chimpanzee extensively overlaps the gorilla in its forest range’;

Rangenoun

a large cooking stove with burners or hotplates and one or more ovens, all of which are kept continually hot

‘a wood-burning kitchen range’;

Rangenoun

an electric or gas cooker.

Rangenoun

a row of buildings

‘Townesend's Durham quadrangle range at Trinity College’;

Rangenoun

a continuous stretch of a building.

Rangenoun

the direction or position in which something lies

‘the range of the hills and valleys is nearly from north to south’;

Rangeverb

vary or extend between specified limits

‘prices range from £30 to £100’;

Rangeverb

place or arrange in a row or rows or in a specified manner

‘a table with half a dozen chairs ranged around it’;

Rangeverb

run or extend in a line in a particular direction

‘he regularly came to the benches that ranged along the path’;

Rangeverb

(with reference to type) align or be aligned, especially at the ends of successive lines.

Rangeverb

place oneself or be placed in opposition to (a person or group)

‘Japan ranged herself against the European nations’;

Rangeverb

(of a person or animal) travel or wander over a wide area

‘patrols ranged deep into enemy territory’; ‘free-ranging groups of baboons’; ‘tribes who ranged the windswept lands of the steppe’;

Rangeverb

(of a person's eyes) pass from one person or thing to another

‘his eyes ranged over them’;

Rangeverb

(of something written or spoken) cover a wide number of different topics

‘tutorials ranged over a variety of subjects’;

Rangeverb

obtain the range of a target by adjustment after firing past it or short of it, or by the use of radar or laser equipment

‘radar-type transmissions which appeared to be ranging on our convoys’;

Rangeverb

(of a projectile) cover a specified distance.

Rangeverb

(of a gun) send a projectile over a specified distance.

Rangeadjective

(of a person or their lifestyle) orderly; settled

‘it's possible to be too rangé’; ‘by comparison with Strachey, Keynes was rangé’;

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