VS.

Distant vs. Distance

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Distantadjective

Far off (physically, logically or mentally).

‘We heard a distant rumbling but didn't pay any more attention to it.’; ‘She was surprised to find that her fiancé was a distant relative of hers.’; ‘His distant look showed that he was not listening to me.’;

Distancenoun

(countable) The amount of space between two points, usually geographical points, usually (but not necessarily) measured along a straight line.

‘The distance to Petersborough is thirty miles.’; ‘From Moscow, the distance is relatively short to Saint Petersburg, relatively long to Novosibirsk, but even greater to Vladivostok.’;

Distantadjective

Emotionally unresponsive or unwilling to express genuine feelings.

‘Ever since our argument, she has been totally distant toward me.’;

Distancenoun

Length or interval of time.

Distantadjective

Separated; having an intervening space; at a distance; away.

‘One board had two tenons, equally distant.’; ‘Diana's temple is not distant far.’;

Distancenoun

The difference; the subjective measure between two quantities.

‘We're narrowing the distance between the two versions of the bill.’; ‘The distance between the lowest and next gear on my bicycle is annoying.’;

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Distantadjective

Far separated; far off; not near; remote; - in place, time, consanguinity, or connection; as, distant times; distant relatives.

‘The success of these distant enterprises.’;

Distancenoun

Remoteness of place; a remote place.

Distantadjective

Reserved or repelling in manners; cold; not cordial; somewhat haughty; as, a distant manner.

‘He passed me with a distant bow.’;

Distancenoun

Remoteness in succession or relation.

‘the distance between a descendant and his ancestor’;

Distantadjective

Indistinct; faint; obscure, as from distance.

‘Some distant knowledge.’; ‘A distant glimpse.’;

Distancenoun

A space marked out in the last part of a racecourse.

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Distantadjective

Not conformable; discrepant; repugnant; as, a practice so widely distant from Christianity.

Distancenoun

The entire amount of progress to an objective.

‘He had promised to perform this task, but did not go the distance.’;

Distantadjective

separated in space or time or coming from or going to a distance;

‘the distant past’; ‘distant villages’; ‘the sound of distant traffic’; ‘a distant sound’; ‘a distant telephone call’;

Distancenoun

A withholding of intimacy; alienation; variance.

‘The friendship did not survive the row: they kept each other at a distance.’;

Distantadjective

far apart in relevance or relationship;

‘a distant cousin’; ‘a distant likeness’;

Distancenoun

The remoteness or reserve which respect requires; hence, respect; ceremoniousness.

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Distantadjective

remote in manner;

‘stood apart with aloof dignity’; ‘a distant smile’; ‘he was upstage with strangers’;

Distanceverb

(transitive) To move away (from) someone or something.

‘He distanced himself from the comments made by some of his colleagues.’;

Distantadjective

far distant in time;

‘distant events’; ‘the remote past or future’; ‘a civilization ten centuries removed from modern times’;

Distanceverb

(transitive) To leave at a distance; to outpace, leave behind.

Distantadjective

far distant in space;

‘distant lands’; ‘remote stars’; ‘a remote outpost of civilization’; ‘a hideaway far removed from towns and cities’;

Distancenoun

The space between two objects; the length of a line, especially the shortest line joining two points or things that are separate; measure of separation in place.

‘Every particle attracts every other with a force . . . inversely proportioned to the square of the distance.’;

Distantadjective

far away in space or time

‘distant parts of the world’; ‘I remember that distant afternoon’;

Distancenoun

Remoteness of place; a remote place.

‘Easily managed from a distance.’; ‘'T is distance lends enchantment to the view.’; ‘[He] waits at distance till he hears from Cato.’;

Distantadjective

(after a measurement) at a specified distance

‘the town lay half a mile distant’; ‘the star is 30,000 light years distant from Earth’;

Distancenoun

A space marked out in the last part of a race course.

‘The horse that ran the whole field out of distance.’;

Distantadjective

(of a sound) faint because far away

‘the distant bark of some farm dog’;

Distancenoun

Relative space, between troops in ranks, measured from front to rear; - contrasted with interval, which is measured from right to left.

Distantadjective

remote or far apart in resemblance or relationship

‘a distant acquaintance’;

Distancenoun

Space between two antagonists in fencing.

Distantadjective

(of a person) not closely related

‘a distant cousin of the King’;

Distancenoun

The part of a picture which contains the representation of those objects which are the farthest away, esp. in a landscape.

Distantadjective

(of a person) not intimate; cool or reserved

‘she and my father were distant with each other’; ‘his children found him strangely distant’;

Distancenoun

Ideal disjunction; discrepancy; contrariety.

Distantadjective

not paying attention; remote

‘a distant look in his eyes’;

Distancenoun

Length or interval of time; period, past or future, between two eras or events.

‘Ten years' distance between one and the other.’; ‘The writings of Euclid at the distance of two thousand years.’;

Distancenoun

The remoteness or reserve which respect requires; hence, respect; ceremoniousness.

‘I hope your modestyWill know what distance to the crown is due.’; ‘'T is by respect and distance that authority is upheld.’;

Distancenoun

A withholding of intimacy; alienation; coldness; disagreement; variance; restraint; reserve.

‘Setting them [factions] at distance, or at least distrust amongst themselves.’; ‘On the part of Heaven,Now alienated, distance and distaste.’;

Distancenoun

Remoteness in succession or relation; as, the distance between a descendant and his ancestor.

Distancenoun

The interval between two notes; as, the distance of a fourth or seventh.

‘If a man makes me keep my distance, the comfort is he keeps his at the same time.’;

Distanceverb

To place at a distance or remotely.

‘I heard nothing thereof at Oxford, being then miles distanced thence.’;

Distanceverb

To cause to appear as if at a distance; to make seem remote.

‘His peculiar art of distancing an object to aggrandize his space.’;

Distanceverb

To outstrip by as much as a distance (see Distance, n., 3); to leave far behind; to surpass greatly.

‘He distanced the most skillful of his contemporaries.’;

Distancenoun

the property created by the space between two objects or points

Distancenoun

a distant region;

‘I could see it in the distance’;

Distancenoun

size of the gap between two places;

‘the distance from New York to Chicago’; ‘he determined the length of the shortest line segment joining the two points’;

Distancenoun

indifference by personal withdrawal;

‘emotional distance’;

Distancenoun

the interval between two times;

‘the distance from birth to death’; ‘it all happened in the space of 10 minutes’;

Distancenoun

a remote point in time;

‘if that happens it will be at some distance in the future’; ‘at a distance of ten years he had forgotten many of the details’;

Distanceverb

keep at a distance;

‘we have to distance ourselves from these events in order to continue living’;

Distanceverb

go far ahead of;

‘He outdistanced the other runners’;

Distancenoun

the length of the space between two points

‘you may have to walk long distances’; ‘I cycled the short distance home’;

Distancenoun

the condition of being far off; remoteness

‘distance makes things look small’;

Distancenoun

a far-off point

‘watching them from a distance’;

Distancenoun

the more remote part of what is visible or discernible

‘they sped off into the distance’; ‘I heard police sirens in the distance’;

Distancenoun

an interval of time

‘the sort of goal which remains in the memory even at a distance of six years’;

Distancenoun

the full length of a race

‘he claimed the 100 m title in only his second race over the distance’;

Distancenoun

a space of more than twenty lengths between two finishers in a race

‘he stormed home by a distance in the Handicap Chase’;

Distancenoun

a length of 240 yards from the winning post on a racecourse.

Distancenoun

the distance from the winning post which a horse must have reached when the winner finishes in order to qualify for a subsequent heat.

Distancenoun

the scheduled length of a fight

‘he has won his first five fights inside the distance’;

Distancenoun

the avoidance of familiarity; reserve

‘a mix of warmth and distance makes a good neighbour’;

Distanceverb

make (someone or something) far off or remote in position or nature

‘her mother wished to distance her from the rough village children’;

Distanceverb

declare that one is not connected with or a supporter of (someone or something)

‘he sought to distance himself from the proposals’;

Distanceverb

beat (a horse) by a distance.

Distance

Distance is a numerical measurement of how far apart objects or points are. In physics or everyday usage, distance may refer to a physical length or an estimation based on other criteria (e.g.

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