VS.

Cost vs. Expense

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Costverb

To incur a charge; to require payment of a price.

‘This shirt cost $50, while this was cheaper at only $30.’; ‘It will cost you a lot of money to take a trip around the world.’;

Expensenoun

A spending or consuming, often a disbursement of funds.

‘She went to great expense to ensure her children would get the best education.’; ‘Buying the car was a big expense, but will be worth it in the long run.’; ‘We had a training weekend in New York, at the expense of our company.’;

Costverb

To cause something to be lost; to cause the expenditure or relinquishment of.

‘Trying to rescue the man from the burning building cost them their lives.’;

Expensenoun

The elimination or consumption of something, sometimes with the notion of loss or damage to the thing eliminated.

‘Jones reached the final at the expense of Smith, who couldn't beat him.’;

Costverb

To require to be borne or suffered; to cause.

Expensenoun

(obsolete) Loss.

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Costverb

To calculate or estimate a price.

‘I'd cost''' the repair work at a few thousand.’;

Expenseverb

(transitive) To charge a cost against an expense account; to bill something to the company for which one works.

‘It should be acceptable to expense a business lunch with a client.’;

Costnoun

Amount of money, time, etc. that is required or used.

‘The total cost of the new complex was an estimated $1.5 million.’; ‘We have to cut costs if we want to avoid bankruptcy.’; ‘The average cost of a new house is twice as much as it was 20 years ago.’;

Expensenoun

A spending or consuming; disbursement; expenditure.

‘Husband nature's riches from expense.’;

Costnoun

A negative consequence or loss that occurs or is required to occur.

‘There were many costs to the development project, the least of all was the financial aspect.’; ‘If you train all the time, there will be a few costs such as a lack of free time.’;

Expensenoun

That which is expended, laid out, or consumed; cost; outlay; charge; - sometimes with the notion of loss or damage to those on whom the expense falls; as, the expenses of war; an expense of time.

‘Courting popularity at his party's expense.’;

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Costnoun

(obsolete) Manner; way; means; available course; contrivance.

Expensenoun

Loss.

‘And moan the expense of many a vanished sight.’;

Costnoun

Quality; condition; property; value; worth; a wont or habit; disposition; nature; kind; characteristic.

Expensenoun

amounts paid for goods and services that may be currently tax deductible (as opposed to capital expenditures)

Costnoun

(obsolete) A rib; a side.

Expensenoun

a detriment or sacrifice;

‘at the expense of’;

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Costnoun

(heraldry) A cottise.

Expensenoun

money spent to perform work and usually reimbursed by an employer;

‘he kept a careful record of his expenses at the meeting’;

Costnoun

A rib; a side; a region or coast.

‘Betwixt the costs of a ship.’;

Expensenoun

the cost incurred in or required for something

‘conference rooms were equipped at great expense’; ‘book into the best hotel you can find and hang the expense’;

Costnoun

See Cottise.

Expensenoun

the costs incurred in the performance of one's job or a specific task

‘his hotel and travel expenses’;

Costnoun

The amount paid, charged, or engaged to be paid, for anything bought or taken in barter; charge; expense; hence, whatever, as labor, self-denial, suffering, etc., is requisite to secure benefit.

‘One day shall crown the alliance on 't so please you,Here at my house, and at my proper cost.’; ‘At less cost of life than is often expended in a skirmish, [Charles V.] saved Europe from invasion.’;

Expensenoun

a thing on which one is required to spend money

‘tolls are a daily expense’;

Costnoun

Loss of any kind; detriment; pain; suffering.

‘I know thy trains,Though dearly to my cost, thy gins and toils.’;

Expenseverb

offset (an item of expenditure) as an expense against taxable income

‘up to $17,500 in capital expenditures can be expensed in the year they were incurred’;

Costnoun

Expenses incurred in litigation.

Expenseverb

charge (something) to an expense account

‘I can expense the refreshments’;

Costverb

To require to be given, expended, or laid out therefor, as in barter, purchase, acquisition, etc.; to cause the cost, expenditure, relinquishment, or loss of; as, the ticket cost a dollar; the effort cost his life.

‘A diamond gone, cost me two thousand ducats.’; ‘Though it cost me ten nights' watchings.’;

Expense

Expenditure is an outflow of money, or any form of fortune in general, to another person or group as payment for an item, service, or other category of costs. For a tenant, rent is an expense.

Costverb

To require to be borne or suffered; to cause.

‘To do him wanton rites, which cost them woe.’;

Costnoun

the total spent for goods or services including money and time and labor

Costnoun

the property of having material worth (often indicated by the amount of money something would bring if sold);

‘the fluctuating monetary value of gold and silver’; ‘he puts a high price on his services’; ‘he couldn't calculate the cost of the collection’;

Costnoun

value measured by what must be given or done or undergone to obtain something;

‘the cost in human life was enormous’; ‘the price of success is hard work’; ‘what price glory?’;

Costverb

be priced at;

‘These shoes cost $100’;

Costverb

require to lose, suffer, or sacrifice;

‘This mistake cost him his job’;

Cost

In production, research, retail, and accounting, a cost is the value of money that has been used up to produce something or deliver a service, and hence is not available for use anymore. In business, the cost may be one of acquisition, in which case the amount of money expended to acquire it is counted as cost.

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