VS.

Contact vs. Hit

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Contactnoun

The act of touching physically; being in close association.

Hitverb

To strike.

Contactnoun

The establishment of communication (with).

‘I haven't been in contact with her for years.’;

Hitverb

(transitive) To administer a blow to, directly or with a weapon or missile.

‘One boy hit the other.’;

Contactnoun

A nodule designed to connect a device with something else.

‘Touch the contact to ground and read the number again.’;

Hitverb

(transitive) To come into contact with forcefully and suddenly.

‘The ball hit the fence.’;

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Contactnoun

Someone with whom one is in communication.

‘The salesperson had a whole binder full of contacts for potential clients.’;

Hitverb

(intransitive) To strike against something.

Contactnoun

(informal) A contact lens.

Hitverb

To kill a person, usually on the instructions of a third party.

‘Hit him tonight and throw the body in the river.’;

Contactnoun

(electricity) A device designed for repetitive connections.

Hitverb

To attack, especially amphibiously.

‘If intelligence had been what it should have been, I don't think we'd ever have hit that island.’;

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Contactnoun

Contact juggling.

‘I bought myself a new contact ball last week’;

Hitverb

To briefly visit.

‘We hit the grocery store on the way to the park.’;

Contactnoun

(mining) The plane between two adjacent bodies of dissimilar rock.

Hitverb

To encounter an obstacle or other difficulty.

‘You'll hit some nasty thunderstorms if you descend too late.’; ‘We hit a lot of traffic coming back from the movies.’;

Contactverb

(transitive) To touch; to come into physical contact with.

‘The side of the car contacted the pedestrian.’;

Hitverb

(heading) To attain, to achieve.

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Contactverb

(transitive) To establish communication with something or someone

‘I am trying to contact my sister.’;

Hitverb

To reach or achieve.

‘I hit the jackpot.’; ‘The movie hits theaters in December.’; ‘The temperature could hit 110°F tomorrow.’; ‘We hit Detroit at one in the morning but kept driving through the night.’;

Contactnoun

A close union or junction of bodies; a touching or meeting.

Hitverb

(intransitive) To meet or reach what was aimed at or desired; to succeed, often by luck.

Contactnoun

The property of two curves, or surfaces, which meet, and at the point of meeting have a common direction.

Hitverb

To guess; to light upon or discover.

Contactnoun

The plane between two adjacent bodies of dissimilar rock.

Hitverb

(transitive) To affect negatively.

‘The economy was hit by a recession.’; ‘The hurricane hit his fishing business hard.’;

Contactnoun

A metallic conducting component of an electrical device connected to a circuit within and so situated that it may form a conducting pathway to an external power source or device when contacted by another conductor; as, the contact on a standard light bulb has the shape of a screw for easy insertion into the socket.

Hitverb

(metaphorically) To attack.

Contactnoun

A person who serves to commmunicate information to or from one group to another, whether formally or informally; as, a good Washington reporter has contacts in the White House.

Hitverb

To make a play.

Contactnoun

close interaction;

‘they kept in daily contact’; ‘they claimed that they had been in contact with extraterrestrial beings’;

Hitverb

In blackjack, to deal a card to.

‘Hit me.’;

Contactnoun

the state or condition of touching or of being in immediate proximity;

‘litmus paper turns red on contact with an acid’;

Hitverb

To come up to bat.

‘Jones hit for the pitcher.’;

Contactnoun

the act of touching physically;

‘her fingers came in contact with the light switch’;

Hitverb

(backgammon) To take up, or replace by a piece belonging to the opposing player; said of a single unprotected piece on a point.

Contactnoun

the physical coming together of two or more things;

‘contact with the pier scraped paint from the hull’;

Hitverb

To use; to connect to.

‘The external web servers hit DBSRV7, but the internal web server hits DBSRV3.’;

Contactnoun

a person who is in a position to give you special assistance;

‘he used his business contacts to get an introduction to the governor’;

Hitverb

To have sex with.

‘I'd hit that.’;

Contactnoun

a channel for communication between groups;

‘he provided a liaison with the guerrillas’;

Hitverb

To inhale an amount of smoke from a narcotic substance, particularly marijuana.

Contactnoun

(electronics) a junction where things (as two electrical conductors) touch or are in physical contact;

‘they forget to solder the contacts’;

Hitnoun

A blow; a punch; a striking against; the collision of one body against another; the stroke that touches anything.

‘The hit was very slight.’;

Contactnoun

a communicative interaction;

‘the pilot made contact with the base’; ‘he got in touch with his colleagues’;

Hitnoun

Something very successful, such as a song, film, or video game, that receives widespread recognition and acclaim.

Contactnoun

a thin curved glass or plastic lens designed to fit over the cornea in order to correct vision or to deliver medication

Hitnoun

An attack on a location, person or people.

Contactverb

be in or establish communication with;

‘Our advertisements reach millions’; ‘He never contacted his children after he emigrated to Australia’;

Hitnoun

In the game of Battleship, a correct guess at where one's opponent ship is.

Contactverb

be in direct physical contact with; make contact;

‘The two buildings touch’; ‘Their hands touched’; ‘The wire must not contact the metal cover’; ‘The surfaces contact at this point’;

Hitnoun

A match found by searching a computer system or search engine

Hitnoun

(Internet) A measured visit to a web site, a request for a single file from a web server.

‘My site received twice as many hits after being listed in a search engine.’;

Hitnoun

An approximately correct answer in a test set.

Hitnoun

(baseball) The complete play, when the batter reaches base without the benefit of a walk, error, or fielder’s choice.

‘The catcher got a hit to lead off the fifth.’;

Hitnoun

(colloquial) A dose of an illegal or addictive drug.

‘Where am I going to get my next hit?’;

Hitnoun

A premeditated murder done for criminal or political purposes.

Hitnoun

(dated) A peculiarly apt expression or turn of thought; a phrase which hits the mark.

‘a happy hit’;

Hitnoun

(backgammon) A move that throws one of the opponent's men back to the entering point.

Hitnoun

(backgammon) A game won after the adversary has removed some of his men. It counts for less than a gammon.

Hitadjective

Very successful.

‘The band played their hit song to the delight of the fans.’;

Hitpronoun

(dialectal) It.

Hitpronoun

It.

Hit

3d pers. sing. pres. of Hide, contracted from hideth.

Hitverb

To reach with a stroke or blow; to strike or touch, usually with force; especially, to reach or touch (an object aimed at).

‘I think you have hit the mark.’;

Hitverb

To reach or attain exactly; to meet according to the occasion; to perform successfully; to attain to; to accord with; to be conformable to; to suit.

‘Birds learning tunes, and their endeavors to hit the notes right.’; ‘There you hit him; . . . that argument never fails with him.’; ‘Whose saintly visage is too brightTo hit the sense of human sight.’; ‘He scarcely hit my humor.’;

Hitverb

To guess; to light upon or discover.

Hitverb

To take up, or replace by a piece belonging to the opposing player; - said of a single unprotected piece on a point.

Hitverb

To meet or come in contact; to strike; to clash; - followed by against or on.

‘If bodies be extension alone, how can they move and hit one against another?’; ‘Corpuscles, meeting with or hitting on those bodies, become conjoined with them.’;

Hitverb

To meet or reach what was aimed at or desired; to succeed, - often with implied chance, or luck.

‘And oft it hitsWhere hope is coldest and despair most fits.’; ‘And millions miss for one that hits.’;

Hitnoun

A striking against; the collision of one body against another; the stroke that touches anything.

‘So he the famed Cilician fencer praised,And, at each hit, with wonder seems amazed.’;

Hitnoun

A stroke of success in an enterprise, as by a fortunate chance; as, he made a hit;

‘What late he called a blessing, now was wit,And God's good providence, a lucky hit.’;

Hitnoun

A peculiarly apt expression or turn of thought; a phrase which hits the mark; as, a happy hit.

Hitnoun

A game won at backgammon after the adversary has removed some of his men. It counts less than a gammon.

Hitnoun

A striking of the ball; as, a safe hit; a foul hit; - sometimes used specifically for a base hit.

Hitnoun

An act of murder performed for hire, esp. by a professional assassin.

Hitnoun

(baseball) a successful stroke in an athletic contest (especially in baseball);

‘he came all the way around on Williams' hit’;

Hitnoun

the act of contacting one thing with another;

‘repeated hitting raised a large bruise’; ‘after three misses she finally got a hit’;

Hitnoun

a conspicuous success;

‘that song was his first hit and marked the beginning of his career’; ‘that new Broadway show is a real smasher’; ‘the party went with a bang’;

Hitnoun

(physics) an brief event in which two or more bodies come together;

‘the collision of the particles resulted in an exchange of energy and a change of direction’;

Hitnoun

a dose of a narcotic drug

Hitnoun

a murder carried out by an underworld syndicate;

‘it has all the earmarks of a Mafia hit’;

Hitnoun

a connection made via the internet to another website;

‘WordNet gets many hits from users worldwide’;

Hitverb

cause to move by striking;

‘hit a ball’;

Hitverb

hit against; come into sudden contact with;

‘The car hit a tree’; ‘He struck the table with his elbow’;

Hitverb

affect or afflict suddenly, usually adversely;

‘We were hit by really bad weather’; ‘He was stricken with cancer when he was still a teenager’; ‘The earthquake struck at midnight’;

Hitverb

deal a blow to, either with the hand or with an instrument;

‘He hit her hard in the face’;

Hitverb

reach a destination, either real or abstract;

‘We hit Detroit by noon’; ‘The water reached the doorstep’; ‘We barely made it to the finish line’; ‘I have to hit the MAC machine before the weekend starts’;

Hitverb

reach a point in time, or a certain state or level;

‘The thermometer hit 100 degrees’; ‘This car can reach a speed of 140 miles per hour’;

Hitverb

hit with a missile from a weapon

Hitverb

cause to experience suddenly;

‘Panic struck me’; ‘An interesting idea hit her’; ‘A thought came to me’; ‘The thought struck terror in our minds’; ‘They were struck with fear’;

Hitverb

make a strategic, offensive, assault against an enemy, opponent, or a target;

‘The Germans struck Poland on Sept. 1, 1939’; ‘We must strike the enemy's oil fields’; ‘in the fifth inning, the Giants struck, sending three runners home to win the game 5 to 2’;

Hitverb

hit the intended target or goal

Hitverb

produce by manipulating keys or strings of musical instruments, also metaphorically;

‘The pianist strikes a middle C’; ‘strike `z' on the keyboard’; ‘her comments struck a sour note’;

Hitverb

encounter by chance;

‘I stumbled across a long-lost cousin last night in a restaurant’;

Hitverb

gain points in a game;

‘The home team scored many times’; ‘He hit a home run’; ‘He hit .300 in the past season’;

Hitverb

consume to excess;

‘hit the bottle’;

Hitverb

kill intentionally and with premeditation;

‘The mafia boss ordered his enemies murdered’;

Hitverb

drive something violently into a location;

‘he hit his fist on the table’; ‘she struck her head on the low ceiling’;

Hitverb

pay unsolicited and usually unwanted sexual attention to;

‘He tries to hit on women in bars’;

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