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Consignee vs. Receiver

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Wikipedia
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  • Consignee (noun)

    The person to whom a shipment is to be delivered.

  • Consignee (noun)

    One to whom anything is consigned or entrusted.

  • Receiver (noun)

    A person who or thing that receives or is intended to receive something.

    "recipient}} {{gloss|more formal, usually referring to one who receives such things as an award or medal"

  • Receiver (noun)

    A trustee appointed to hold and administer property involved in litigation.

  • Receiver (noun)

    A person appointed to settle the affairs of an insolvent entity.

    "insolvency administrator|insolvency practitioner|liquidator|administrator|court administrator|trustee in bankruptcy"

  • Receiver (noun)

    A person who accepts stolen goods.

  • Receiver (noun)

    Any of several electronic devices that receive signals and convert them into sound or vision.

    "transmitter"

  • Receiver (noun)

    A telephone handset.

  • Receiver (noun)

    A smartphone earpiece.

  • Receiver (noun)

    An offensive player who catches the ball after it has been passed.

  • Receiver (noun)

    A person who attempts to served.

  • Receiver (noun)

    An element of a mechanical or other system or device designed to accept another element.

  • Receiver (noun)

    The part of a firearm containing the action.

  • Receiver (noun)

    A vessel for receiving the exhaust steam from the high-pressure cylinder before it enters the low-pressure cylinder, in a compound steam engine.

  • Receiver (noun)

    A capacious vessel for receiving steam from a distant boiler, and supplying it dry to an engine.

Wiktionary
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Oxford Dictionary
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  • Consignee (noun)

    The person to whom goods or other things are consigned; a factor; - correlative to consignor.

  • Receiver (noun)

    One who takes or receives in any manner.

  • Receiver (noun)

    A person appointed, ordinarily by a court, to receive, and hold in trust, money or other property which is the subject of litigation, pending the suit; a person appointed to take charge of the estate and effects of a corporation, and to do other acts necessary to winding up its affairs, in certain cases.

  • Receiver (noun)

    One who takes or buys stolen goods from a thief, knowing them to be stolen.

  • Receiver (noun)

    A vessel connected with an alembic, a retort, or the like, for receiving and condensing the product of distillation.

  • Receiver (noun)

    The glass vessel in which the vacuum is produced, and the objects of experiment are put, in experiments with an air pump. Cf. Bell jar, and see Illust. of Air pump.

  • Receiver (noun)

    A vessel for receiving the exhaust steam from the high-pressure cylinder before it enters the low-pressure cylinder, in a compound engine.

  • Receiver (noun)

    That portion of a telephonic apparatus, or similar system, at which the message is received and made audible; - opposed to transmitter.

  • Receiver (noun)

    In portable breech-loading firearms, the steel frame screwed to the breech end of the barrel, which receives the bolt or block, gives means of securing for firing, facilitates loading, and holds the ejector, cut-off, etc.

Webster Dictionary
  • Consignee (noun)

    the person to whom merchandise is delivered over

  • Receiver (noun)

    set that receives radio or tv signals

  • Receiver (noun)

    (law) a person (usually appointed by a court of law) who liquidates assets or preserves them for the benefit of affected parties

  • Receiver (noun)

    earphone that converts electrical signals into sounds

  • Receiver (noun)

    a person who gets something

  • Receiver (noun)

    a football player who catches (or is supposed to catch) a forward pass

Princeton's WordNet

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