VS.

Conceal vs. Disguise

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Concealverb

(transitive) To hide something from view or from public knowledge, to try to keep something secret.

‘He tried to conceal the truth about his health.’;

Disguisenoun

Material (such as clothing, makeup, a wig) used to alter one’s visual appearance in order to hide one's identity or assume another.

‘A cape and moustache completed his disguise.’;

Concealverb

To hide or withdraw from observation; to cover; to cover or keep from sight; to prevent the discovery of; to withhold knowledge of.

‘It is the glory of God to conceal a thing.’; ‘Declare ye among the nations, . . . publish and conceal not.’; ‘He which finds him shall deserve our thanks, . . . He that conceals him, death.’; ‘Bur double griefs afflict concealing hearts.’; ‘Both dissemble deeply their affections.’; ‘We have in these words a primary sense, which reveals a future state, and a secondary sense, which hides and secretes it.’;

Disguisenoun

(figuratively) The appearance of something on the outside which masks what's beneath.

Concealverb

prevent from being seen or discovered;

‘Muslim women hide their faces’; ‘hide the money’;

Disguisenoun

The act of disguising, notably as a ploy.

‘Any disguise may expose soldiers to be deemed enemy spies.’;

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Concealverb

hold back; keep from being perceived by others;

‘She conceals her anger well’;

Disguisenoun

(archaic) A change of behaviour resulting from intoxication.

Disguiseverb

(transitive) To change the appearance of (a person or thing) so as to hide, or to assume an identity.

‘Spies often disguise themselves.’;

Disguiseverb

(transitive) To avoid giving away or revealing (something secret); to hide by a false appearance.

‘He disguised his true intentions.’;

Disguiseverb

(archaic) To affect or change by liquor; to intoxicate.

Disguiseverb

To change the guise or appearance of; especially, to conceal by an unusual dress, or one intended to mislead or deceive.

‘Bunyan was forced to disguise himself as a wagoner.’;

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Disguiseverb

To hide by a counterfeit appearance; to cloak by a false show; to mask; as, to disguise anger; to disguise one's sentiments, character, or intentions.

‘All God's angels come to us disguised.’;

Disguiseverb

To affect or change by liquor; to intoxicate.

‘I have just left the right worshipful, and his myrmidons, about a sneaker of five gallons; the whole magistracy was pretty well disguised before I gave them the ship.’;

Disguisenoun

A dress or exterior put on for purposes of concealment or of deception; as, persons doing unlawful acts in disguise are subject to heavy penalties.

‘There is no passion which steals into the heart more imperceptibly and covers itself under more disguises, than pride.’;

Disguisenoun

Artificial language or manner assumed for deception; false appearance; counterfeit semblance or show.

‘That eye which glances through all disguises.’;

Disguisenoun

Change of manner by drink; intoxication.

Disguisenoun

A masque or masquerade.

‘Disguise was the old English word for a masque.’;

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Disguisenoun

an outward semblance that misrepresents the true nature of something;

‘the theatrical notion of disguise is always associated with catastrophe in his stories’;

Disguisenoun

any attire that modifies the appearance in order to conceal the wearer's identity

Disguisenoun

the act of concealing the identity of something by modifying its appearance;

‘he is a master of disguise’;

Disguiseverb

make unrecognizable;

‘The herb disguises the garlic taste’; ‘We disguised our faces before robbing the bank’;

Disguise

A disguise can be anything which conceals or changes a person's physical appearance, including a wig, glasses, makeup, fake moustache, costume or other items. Camouflage is a type of disguise for people, animals and objects.

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