VS.

Complete vs. Accomplish

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Completeverb

(transitive) To finish; to make done; to reach the end.

‘He completed the assignment on time.’;

Accomplishverb

(transitive) To finish successfully.

Completeverb

(transitive) To make whole or entire.

‘The last chapter completes the book nicely.’;

Accomplishverb

(transitive) To complete, as time or distance.

Completeadjective

With all parts included; with nothing missing; full.

‘My life will be complete once I buy this new television.’; ‘She offered me complete control of the project.’; ‘After she found the rook, the chess set was complete.’;

Accomplishverb

(transitive) To execute fully; to fulfill; to complete successfully.

‘to accomplish a design, an object, a promise’;

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Completeadjective

Finished; ended; concluded; completed.

‘When your homework is complete, you can go and play with Martin.’;

Accomplishverb

To equip or furnish thoroughly; hence, to complete in acquirements; to render accomplished; to polish.

Completeadjective

Generic intensifier.

‘He is a complete bastard!’; ‘It was a complete shock when he turned up on my doorstep.’; ‘Our vacation was a complete disaster.’;

Accomplishverb

To gain; to obtain.

Completeadjective

In which every Cauchy sequence converges to a point within the space.

Accomplishverb

To complete, as time or distance.

‘That He would accomplish seventy years in the desolations of Jerusalem.’; ‘He had accomplished half a league or more.’;

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Completeadjective

In which every set with a lower bound has a greatest lower bound.

Accomplishverb

To bring to an issue of full success; to effect; to perform; to execute fully; to fulfill; as, to accomplish a design, an object, a promise.

‘This that is written must yet be accomplished in me.’;

Completeadjective

In which all small limits exist.

Accomplishverb

To equip or furnish thoroughly; hence, to complete in acquirements; to render accomplished; to polish.

‘The armorers accomplishing the knights.’; ‘It [the moon] is fully accomplished for all those ends to which Providence did appoint it.’; ‘These qualities . . . go to accomplish a perfect woman.’;

Completeadjective

In which every semantically valid well-formed formula is provable.

Accomplishverb

To gain; to obtain.

‘He . . . expressed his desire to see a union accomplished between England and Scotland.’; ‘To work in close design by fraud or guileWhat force effected not.’; ‘The Saints, like stars, around his seatPerform their courses still.’;

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Completeadjective

That is in a given complexity class and is such that every other problem in the class can be reduced to it (usually in polynomial time or logarithmic space).

Accomplishverb

put in effect;

‘carry out a task’; ‘execute the decision of the people’; ‘He actioned the operation’;

Completeadjective

Filled up; with no part or element lacking; free from deficiency; entire; perfect; consummate.

‘Ye are complete in him.’; ‘That thou, dead corse, again in complete steelRevisit'st thus the glimpses of the moon.’;

Accomplishverb

to gain with effort;

‘she achieved her goal despite setbacks’;

Completeadjective

Finished; ended; concluded; completed; as, the edifice is complete.

‘This course of vanity almost complete.’;

Completeadjective

Having all the parts or organs which belong to it or to the typical form; having calyx, corolla, stamens, and pistil.

Completeverb

To bring to a state in which there is no deficiency; to perfect; to consummate; to accomplish; to fulfill; to finish; as, to complete a task, or a poem; to complete a course of education.

‘Bred only and completed to the tasteOf lustful appetence.’; ‘And, to complete her bliss, a fool for mate.’;

Completeverb

come or bring to a finish or an end;

‘He finished the dishes’; ‘She completed the requirements for her Master's Degree’; ‘The fastest runner finished the race in just over 2 hours; others finished in over 4 hours’;

Completeverb

bring to a whole, with all the necessary parts or elements;

‘A child would complete the family’;

Completeverb

complete or carry out;

‘discharge one's duties’;

Completeverb

complete a pass

Completeverb

write all the required information onto a form;

‘fill out this questionnaire, please!’; ‘make out a form’;

Completeadjective

having every necessary or normal part or component or step;

‘a complete meal’; ‘a complete wardrobe’; ‘a complete set pf the Britannica’; ‘a complete set of china’; ‘a complete defeat’; ‘a complete accounting’; ‘an incomplete flower’;

Completeadjective

perfect and complete in every respect; having all necessary qualities;

‘a complete gentleman’; ‘consummate happiness’; ‘a consummate performance’;

Completeadjective

having all four whorls or principal parts--sepals and petals and stamens and carpels (or pistils);

‘complete flowers’;

Completeadjective

highly skilled;

‘an accomplished pianist’; ‘a complete musician’;

Completeadjective

without qualification; used informally as (often pejorative) intensifiers;

‘an arrant fool’; ‘a complete coward’; ‘a consummate fool’; ‘a double-dyed villain’; ‘gross negligence’; ‘a perfect idiot’; ‘pure folly’; ‘what a sodding mess’; ‘stark staring mad’; ‘a thoroughgoing villain’; ‘utter nonsense’;

Completeadjective

having come or been brought to a conclusion;

‘the harvesting was complete’; ‘the affair is over, ended, finished’; ‘the abruptly terminated interview’;

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