VS.

Cite vs. Sight

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Citenoun

(informal) a citation

‘We used the number of cites as a rough measure of the significance of each published paper.’;

Sightnoun

(in the singular) The ability to see.

‘He is losing his sight and now can barely read.’;

Citeverb

To call upon officially or authoritatively to appear, as before a court; to summon.

‘The cited dead,Of all past ages, to the general doomShall hasten.’; ‘Cited by finger of God.’;

Sightnoun

The act of seeing; perception of objects by the eye; view.

‘to gain sight of land’;

Citeverb

To urge; to enjoin.

Sightnoun

Something seen.

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Citeverb

To quote; to repeat, as a passage from a book, or the words of another.

‘The devil can cite Scripture for his purpose.’;

Sightnoun

Something worth seeing; a spectacle, either good or bad.

‘We went to London and saw all the sights – Buckingham Palace, Tower Bridge, and so on.’; ‘You really look a sight in that ridiculous costume!’;

Citeverb

To refer to or specify, as for support, proof, illustration, or confirmation.

‘The imperfections which you have cited.’;

Sightnoun

A device used in aiming a projectile, through which the person aiming looks at the intended target.

Citeverb

To bespeak; to indicate.

‘Aged honor cites a virtuous youth.’;

Sightnoun

A small aperture through which objects are to be seen, and by which their direction is settled or ascertained.

‘the sight of a quadrant’;

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Citeverb

To notify of a proceeding in court.

Sightnoun

a great deal, a lot; frequently used to intensify a comparative.

‘a sight of money’; ‘This is a darn sight better than what I'm used to at home!’;

Citeverb

make reference to;

‘His name was mentioned in connection with the invention’;

Sightnoun

In a drawing, picture, etc., that part of the surface, as of paper or canvas, which is within the frame or the border or margin. In a frame, the open space, the opening.

Citeverb

commend;

‘he was cited for his outstanding achievements’;

Sightnoun

(obsolete) The instrument of seeing; the eye.

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Citeverb

refer to;

‘he referenced his colleagues' work’;

Sightnoun

Mental view; opinion; judgment.

‘In their sight it was harmless.’;

Citeverb

repeat a passage from;

‘He quoted the Bible to her’;

Sightverb

(transitive) To register visually.

Citeverb

refer to for illustration or proof;

‘He said he could quote several instances of this behavior’;

Sightverb

(transitive) To get sight of (something).

‘to sight land from a ship’;

Citeverb

advance evidence for

Sightverb

(transitive) To apply sights to; to adjust the sights of; also, to give the proper elevation and direction to by means of a sight.

‘to sight a rifle or a cannon’;

Citeverb

call in an official matter, such as to attend court

Sightverb

(transitive) To take aim at.

Citeverb

refer to (a passage, book, or author) as evidence for or justification of an argument or statement, especially in a scholarly work

‘authors who are highly regarded by their peers tend to be cited’; ‘he does not cite any source for this assertion’;

Sightnoun

The act of seeing; perception of objects by the eye; view; as, to gain sight of land.

‘A cloud received him out of their sight.’;

Citeverb

mention as an example

‘medics have been cited as a key example of a modern breed of technical expert’;

Sightnoun

The power of seeing; the faculty of vision, or of perceiving objects by the instrumentality of the eyes.

‘Thy sight is young,And thou shalt read when mine begin to dazzle.’; ‘O loss of sight, of thee I most complain!’;

Citeverb

praise (someone, typically a member of the armed forces) in an official report for a courageous act

‘he has been cited many times for his contributions in the intelligence area’;

Sightnoun

The state of admitting unobstructed vision; visibility; open view; region which the eye at one time surveys; space through which the power of vision extends; as, an object within sight.

Citeverb

summon (someone) to appear in court

‘the writ cited only four of the signatories of the petition’;

Sightnoun

A spectacle; a view; a show; something worth seeing.

‘Moses said, I will now turn aside and see this great sight, why the bush is not burnt.’; ‘They never saw a sight so fair.’;

Citenoun

a citation.

Sightnoun

The instrument of seeing; the eye.

‘Why cloud they not their sights?’;

Sightnoun

Inspection; examination; as, a letter intended for the sight of only one person.

Sightnoun

Mental view; opinion; judgment; as, in their sight it was harmless.

‘That which is highly esteemed among men is abomination in the sight of God.’;

Sightnoun

A small aperture or optical device through which objects are to be seen, and by which their direction is settled or ascertained; - used on surveying instruments; as, the sight of a quadrant.

‘Thier eyes of fire sparking through sights of steel.’;

Sightnoun

An optical device or small piece of metal, fixed or movable, on the breech, muzzle, center, or trunnion of a gun, or on the breech and the muzzle of a rifle, pistol, etc., by means of which the eye is guided in aiming. A telescope mounted on a weapon, such as a rifle, and used for accurate aiming at distant targets is called a telescopic sight.

Sightnoun

In a drawing, picture, etc., that part of the surface, as of paper or canvas, which is within the frame or the border or margin. In a frame or the like, the open space, the opening.

Sightnoun

A great number, quantity, or sum; as, a sight of money.

‘A wonder sight of flowers.’;

Sightverb

To get sight of; to see; as, to sight land; to sight a wreck.

Sightverb

To look at through a sight; to see accurately; as, to sight an object, as a star.

Sightverb

To apply sights to; to adjust the sights of; also, to give the proper elevation and direction to by means of a sight; as, to sight a rifle or a cannon.

Sightverb

To take aim by a sight.

Sightnoun

an instance of visual perception;

‘the sight of his wife brought him back to reality’; ‘the train was an unexpected sight’;

Sightnoun

anything that is seen;

‘he was a familiar sight on the television’; ‘they went to Paris to see the sights’;

Sightnoun

the ability to see; the faculty of vision

Sightnoun

a optical instrument for aiding the eye in aiming, as on a firearm or surveying instrument

Sightnoun

a range of mental vision;

‘in his sight she could do no wrong’;

Sightnoun

the range of vision;

‘out of sight of land’;

Sightnoun

the act of looking or seeing or observing;

‘he tried to get a better view of it’; ‘his survey of the battlefield was limited’;

Sightnoun

(often followed by `of') a large number or amount or extent;

‘a batch of letters’; ‘a deal of trouble’; ‘a lot of money’; ‘he made a mint on the stock market’; ‘it must have cost plenty’;

Sightverb

catch sight of; to perceive with the eyes;

‘he caught sight of the king's men coming over the ridge’;

Sightnoun

the faculty or power of seeing

‘Joseph lost his sight as a baby’; ‘a sight test’;

Sightnoun

the action or fact of seeing someone or something

‘I've always been scared of the sight of blood’;

Sightnoun

the area or distance within which someone can see or something can be seen

‘he now refused to let Rose out of his sight’;

Sightnoun

a person's view or consideration

‘we are all equal in the sight of God’;

Sightnoun

a thing that one sees or that can be seen

‘John was a familiar sight in the bar for many years’; ‘he was getting used to seeing unpleasant sights’;

Sightnoun

places of interest to tourists and visitors in a city, town, or other place

‘she offered to show me the sights’;

Sightnoun

a person or thing having a ridiculous, repulsive, or dishevelled appearance

‘‘I must look a frightful sight,’ she said’;

Sightnoun

a device on a gun or optical instrument used for assisting a person's precise aim or observation

‘there were reports of a man on the roof aiming a rifle and looking through its sights’;

Sightverb

manage to see or observe (someone or something); catch an initial glimpse of

‘tell me when you sight London Bridge’;

Sightverb

take aim by looking through the sights of a gun

‘she sighted down the barrel’;

Sightverb

take a detailed visual measurement of something with or as with a sight

‘he had to sight along the planks in the proper order to get the line right’;

Sightverb

adjust the sight of (a firearm or optical instrument)

‘even when using binoculars, it is difficult to sight the lens angle in reverse’;

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Sight Illustrations

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