Caviare vs. Caviar - What's the difference?

Wikipedia

  • Caviar

    Caviar (less often, caviare) (from Persian: خاویار‎, xâvyâr "egg-bearing") is a food consisting of salt-cured roe of the Acipenseridae family. Caviar is considered a delicacy and is eaten as a garnish or a spread. The roe can be "fresh" (non-pasteurized) or pasteurized, with pasteurization reducing its culinary and economic value.Traditionally, the term caviar refers only to roe from wild sturgeon in the Caspian Sea and Black Sea (Beluga, Ossetra and Sevruga caviars). Depending on the country, caviar may also be used to describe the roe of other species of sturgeon or other fish such as salmon, steelhead, trout, lumpfish, whitefish, or carp.

Wiktionary

  • Caviare (noun)

    alternative spelling of caviar

  • Caviar (noun)

    Roe of the sturgeon or other large fish, considered a delicacy.

  • Caviar (noun)

    Something whose flavour is too fine for the vulgar taste.

Oxford Dictionary

  • Caviar (noun)

    the pickled roe of sturgeon or other large fish, eaten as a delicacy.

Webster Dictionary

  • Caviar (noun)

    The roes of the sturgeon, prepared and salted; - used as a relish, esp. in Russia.

Princeton's WordNet

  • Caviare (noun)

    salted roe of sturgeon or other large fish; usually served as an hors d'oeuvre

  • Caviar (noun)

    salted roe of sturgeon or other large fish; usually served as an hors d'oeuvre

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