VS.

Cantrip vs. Spell

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Cantripnoun

A spell or incantation; a trifling magic trick.

Spellnoun

Words or a formula supposed to have magical powers.

‘He cast a spell to cure warts.’;

Cantripnoun

A wilful piece of trickery or mischief

Spellnoun

A magical effect or influence induced by an incantation or formula.

‘under a spell’;

Cantrip

Cantrip is a word of Scots origin to mean a magical spell of any kind, or one which reads the same forwards and backwards. It can also be a witch's trick, or a sham.

Spellnoun

(obsolete) Speech, discourse.

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Spellnoun

A shift (of work); (rare) a set of workers responsible for a specific turn of labour.

Spellnoun

(informal) A definite period (of work or other activity).

Spellnoun

(colloquial) An indefinite period of time (usually with a qualifier); by extension, a relatively short distance.

Spellnoun

A period of rest; time off.

Spellnoun

A period of illness, or sudden interval of bad spirits, disease etc.

Spellnoun

(cricket) An uninterrupted series of alternate overs bowled by a single bowler.

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Spellnoun

(dialectal) A splinter, usually of wood; a spelk.

Spellnoun

The wooden bat in the game of trap ball, or knurr and spell.

Spellverb

To put under the influence of a spell; to affect by a spell; to bewitch; to fascinate; to charm.

Spellverb

(obsolete) To speak, to declaim.

Spellverb

(obsolete) To tell; to relate; to teach.

Spellverb

To read (something) as though letter by letter; to peruse slowly or with effort.

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Spellverb

To write or say the letters that form a word or part of a word.

Spellverb

(intransitive) To be able to write or say the letters that form words.

‘I find it difficult to spell because I'm dyslexic.’;

Spellverb

(transitive) Of letters: to compose (a word).

‘The letters “a”, “n” and “d” spell “and”.’;

Spellverb

To indicate that (some event) will occur.

‘This spells trouble.’;

Spellverb

To clarify; to explain in detail.

‘Please spell it out for me.’;

Spellverb

To constitute; to measure.

Spellverb

(transitive) To work in place of (someone).

‘to spell the helmsman’;

Spellverb

(transitive) To rest (someone or something), to give someone or something a rest or break.

‘They spelled the horses and rested in the shade of some trees near a brook.’;

Spellverb

To rest from work for a time.

Spellnoun

A spelk, or splinter.

Spellnoun

The relief of one person by another in any piece of work or watching; also, a turn at work which is carried on by one person or gang relieving another; as, a spell at the pumps; a spell at the masthead.

‘A spell at the wheel is called a trick.’;

Spellnoun

The time during which one person or gang works until relieved; hence, any relatively short period of time, whether a few hours, days, or weeks.

‘Nothing new has happened in this quarter, except the setting in of a severe spell of cold weather.’;

Spellnoun

One of two or more persons or gangs who work by spells.

‘Their toil is so extreme that they can not endure it above four hours in a day, but are succeeded by spells.’;

Spellnoun

A gratuitous helping forward of another's work; as, a logging spell.

Spellnoun

A story; a tale.

Spellnoun

A stanza, verse, or phrase supposed to be endowed with magical power; an incantation; hence, any charm.

‘Start not; her actions shall be holy asYou hear my spell is lawful.’;

Spellverb

To supply the place of for a time; to take the turn of, at work; to relieve; as, to spell the helmsman.

Spellverb

To tell; to relate; to teach.

‘Might I that legend find,By fairies spelt in mystic rhymes.’;

Spellverb

To put under the influence of a spell; to affect by a spell; to bewitch; to fascinate; to charm.

‘He was much spelled with Eleanor Talbot.’;

Spellverb

To constitute; to measure.

‘The Saxon heptarchy, when seven kings put together did spell but one in effect.’;

Spellverb

To tell or name in their proper order letters of, as a word; to write or print in order the letters of, esp. the proper letters; to form, as words, by correct orthography.

‘The word "satire" ought to be spelled with i, and not with y.’;

Spellverb

To discover by characters or marks; to read with difficulty; - usually with out; as, to spell out the sense of an author; to spell out a verse in the Bible.

‘To spell out a God in the works of creation.’; ‘To sit spelling and observing divine justice upon every accident.’;

Spellverb

To form words with letters, esp. with the proper letters, either orally or in writing.

‘When what small knowledge was, in them did dwell,And he a god, who could but read or spell.’;

Spellverb

To study by noting characters; to gain knowledge or learn the meaning of anything, by study.

‘Where I may sit and rightly spellOf every star that heaven doth shew,And every herb that sips the dew.’;

Spellnoun

a psychological state induced by (or as if induced by) a magical incantation

Spellnoun

a time for working (after which you will be relieved by someone else);

‘it's my go’; ‘a spell of work’;

Spellnoun

a period of indeterminate length (usually short) marked by some action or condition;

‘he was here for a little while’; ‘I need to rest for a piece’; ‘a spell of good weather’; ‘a patch of bad weather’;

Spellnoun

a verbal formula believed to have magical force;

‘he whispered a spell as he moved his hands’; ‘inscribed around its base is a charm in Balinese’;

Spellverb

recite the letters of or give the spelling of;

‘How do you spell this word?’;

Spellverb

indicate or signify;

‘I'm afraid this spells trouble!’;

Spellverb

write or name the letters that comprise the conventionally accepted form of (a word or part of a word);

‘He spelled the word wrong in this letter’;

Spellverb

place under a spell

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