Cabin vs. Cottage - What's the difference?

Cabin

A small room; an enclosed place. It is also used to address the smaller thing or place.

U.S: A small dwelling characteristic of the frontier, especially when built from logs with simple tools and not constructed by professional builders, but by those who meant to live in it.

Cottage

A cottage is, typically, a small house. It may carry the connotation of being an old or old-fashioned building. In modern usage, a cottage is usually a modest, often cosy dwelling, typically in a rural or semi-rural location. The word comes from the architecture of England, where it originally referred to a house with ground floor living space and an upper floor of one or more bedrooms fitting under the eaves. In British English the term now denotes a small dwelling of traditional build, although it can also be applied to modern construction designed to resemble traditional houses ("mock cottages"). Cottages may be detached houses, or terraced, such as those built to house workers in mining villages. The tied accommodation provided to farm workers was usually a cottage, see cottage garden. Peasant farmers were once known as cotters. The holiday cottage exists in many cultures under different names. In American English, "cottage" is one term for such holiday homes, although they may also be called a "cabin", "chalet", or even "camp". In certain countries (e.g. Scandinavia, Baltics, and Russia) the term "cottage" has local synonyms: In Finnish mökki, in Estonian suvila, in Swedish stuga, in Norwegian hytte (from the German word Hütte), in Slovak chalupa, in Russian дача (dacha, which can refer to a vacation/summer home, often located near a body of water). There are cottage-style dwellings in American cities that were built primarily for the purpose of housing slaves In places such as Canada, "cottage" carries no connotations of size (compare with vicarage or hermitage).

Cabin vs. Cottage

Cabin

Cottage

Table of contents

1. Etymology
          3.1. Synonyms
          3.2. Derived terms
          3.3. Related terms

Cabin

1. Etymology

From Middle English caban, cabane, from Old French cabane, from Medieval Latin capanna (a cabin).

2. Pronunciation

  • IPA(key): /ˈkæbɪn/
  • Rhymes: -æbɪn

3. Noun

cabin (plural cabins)

  1. (US) A small dwelling characteristic of the frontier, especially when built from logs with simple tools and not constructed by professional builders, but by those who meant to live in it.
    • 1994, Michael Grumley, "Life Drawing" in Violet Quill
      And that was how long we stayed in the cabin, pressed together, pulling the future out of each other, sweating and groaning and making sure each of us remembered.
  2. (informal) A chalet or lodge, especially one that can hold large groups of people.
  3. A compartment on land, usually composed of logs.
  4. A private room on a ship.
    • There is an hour or two, after the passengers have embarked, which is disquieting and fussy. Mail bags, so I understand, are being put on board. Stewards, carrying cabin trunks, swarm in the corridors. Passengers wander restlessly about or hurry, with futile energy, from place to place.
  5. The interior of a boat, enclosed to create a small room, particularly for sleeping.
  6. The passenger area of an airplane.
  7. (travel, aviation) The section of a passenger plane having the same class of service.
  8. (rail transport, informal) A signal box.
  9. A small room; an enclosed place.
    • Edmund Spenser (c.1552–1599)
      So long in secret cabin there he held her captive.
  10. (India) A private office; particularly of a doctor, businessman, lawyer, or other professional.

3.1. Synonyms

  • cell
  • chamber
  • hut
  • pod
  • shack
  • shed

3.2. Antonyms

  • hall
  • palace
  • villa

4. Verb

cabin (third-person singular simple present cabins, present participle cabining, simple past and past participle cabined)

  1. (transitive) To place in a cabin.
  2. (intransitive, obsolete) To live in, or as if in, a cabin; to lodge.
    • Shakespeare
      I'll make you [] cabin in a cave.

5. See also

  • cabana

6. Further reading

  • cabin in Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913
  • cabin in The Century Dictionary, The Century Co., New York, 1911
  • “cabin” at OneLook Dictionary Search

Cottage

1. Etymology

Anglo-Norman, from Old Northern French cot, cote (hut, cottage) + -age (surrounding property). Old Northern French cote probably from Old Norse kot (hut), cognate of Old English cot of same Proto-Germanic origin.

Slang sense “public toilet“ from 19th century, due to resemblance.

2. Pronunciation

  • (General American)
    • IPA(key): /ˈkɑtɪdʒ/, [ˈkɑɾɪdʒ]
    • (weak vowel merger) IPA(key): /ˈkɑtədʒ/, [ˈkɑɾədʒ]
  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈkɒtɪdʒ/
  • Hyphenation: cot‧tage

3. Noun

cottage (plural cottages)

  1. A small house; a cot; a hut.
  2. A seasonal home of any size or stature. A recreational home or a home in a remote location.
  3. (Britain, slang, archaic) A public lavatory
    1. (Polari) as a meeting place for homosexual men.

3.1. Synonyms

  • (public toilet as a gay meeting place): gingerbread office; tea room, tearoom, teahouse, tea house (US); see also Thesaurus:bathroom.

3.2. Derived terms

  • cottage cheese
  • cottage food operation‎
  • cottage hospital
  • cottage industry
  • telecottage
  • cosset
  • cot

4. Verb

cottage (third-person singular simple present cottages, present participle cottaging, simple past and past participle cottaged)

  1. To stay at a seasonal home, to go cottaging.
  2. (intransitive, Polari, of men) To have homosexual sex in a public lavatory; to practice cottaging.

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