VS.

Breaktime vs. Recess

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Breaktimenoun

(US) A break for a worker or workers that splits a period of work.

Recessnoun

A break, pause or vacation.

‘Spring recess offers a good chance to travel.’;

Breaktimenoun

(UK) A break for schoolchildren between lessons.

Recessnoun

An inset, hole, space or opening.

‘Put a generous recess behind the handle for finger space.’;

Recessnoun

A time of play during the school day, usually on a playground; (UK) break, playtime.

‘Students who do not listen in class will not play outside during recess.’;

Recessnoun

A decree of the imperial diet of the old German empire.

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Recessnoun

(archaic) A withdrawing or retiring; a moving back; retreat.

‘the recess of the tides’;

Recessnoun

(archaic) The state of being withdrawn; seclusion; privacy.

Recessnoun

(archaic) A place of retirement, retreat, secrecy, or seclusion.

Recessnoun

A secret or abstruse part.

‘the difficulties and recesses of science’;

Recessnoun

A sinus.

Recessverb

To inset into something, or to recede.

‘Wow, look at how that gargoyle recesses into the rest of architecture.’; ‘Recess the screw so it does not stick out.’;

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Recessverb

(intransitive) To take or declare a break.

‘This court shall recess for its normal two hour lunch now.’; ‘Class will recess for 20 minutes.’;

Recessverb

To appoint, with a recess appointment.

Recessverb

To make a recess in.

‘to recess a wall’;

Recessadjective

Remote, distant (in time or place).

Recessnoun

A withdrawing or retiring; a moving back; retreat; as, the recess of the tides.

‘Every degree of ignorance being so far a recess and degradation from rationality.’; ‘My recess hath given them confidence that I may be conquered.’;

Recessnoun

The state of being withdrawn; seclusion; privacy.

‘In the recess of the jury they are to consider the evidence.’; ‘Good verse recess and solitude requires.’;

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Recessnoun

Remission or suspension of business or procedure; intermission, as of a legislative body, court, or school; as, the children were allowed to play in the school yard during recess.

‘The recess of . . . Parliament lasted six weeks.’;

Recessnoun

Part of a room formed by the receding of the wall, as an alcove, niche, etc.

‘A bed which stood in a deep recess.’;

Recessnoun

A place of retirement, retreat, secrecy, or seclusion.

‘Departure from this happy place, our sweetRecess, and only consolation left.’;

Recessnoun

Secret or abstruse part; as, the difficulties and recesses of science; the deepest recesses of the mind.

Recessnoun

A sinus.

Recessnoun

A decree of the imperial diet of the old German empire.

Recessverb

To make a recess in; as, to recess a wall.

Recessnoun

a state of abeyance or suspended business

Recessnoun

a small concavity

Recessnoun

an arm off of a larger body of water (often between rocky headlands)

Recessnoun

an enclosure that is set back or indented

Recessnoun

a pause from doing something (as work);

‘we took a 10-minute break’; ‘he took time out to recuperate’;

Recessverb

put into a recess;

‘recess lights’;

Recessverb

make a recess in;

‘recess the piece of wood’;

Recessverb

close at the end of a session;

‘The court adjourned’;

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