VS.

Brace vs. Embrace

Published:
Views: 128

Bracenoun

(obsolete) Armor for the arm; vambrace.

Embraceverb

To clasp (someone or each other) in the arms with affection; to take in the arms; to hug.

Bracenoun

(obsolete) A measurement of length, originally representing a person's outstretched arms.

Embraceverb

(obsolete) To accept (someone) as a friend or servant.

Bracenoun

A curved instrument or handle of iron or wood, for holding and turning bits, etc.; a bitstock.

Embraceverb

To seize (something) eagerly, or with alacrity; to accept with cordiality; to welcome.

‘I wholeheartedly embrace the new legislation.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Bracenoun

That which holds anything tightly or supports it firmly; a bandage or a prop.

Embraceverb

To accept; to undergo; to submit to.

Bracenoun

A cord, ligament, or rod, for producing or maintaining tension.

Embraceverb

To encircle; to encompass; to enclose.

Bracenoun

A thong used to regulate the tension of a drum.

Embraceverb

(figurative) To enfold, to include (ideas, principles, etc.); to encompass.

‘Natural philosophy embraces many sciences.’;

ADVERTISEMENT

Bracenoun

The state of being braced or tight; tension.

Embraceverb

(obsolete) To fasten on, as armour.

Bracenoun

Harness; warlike preparation.

Embraceverb

(legal) To attempt to influence (a jury, court, etc.) corruptly; to practise embracery.

Bracenoun

(typography) A curved, pointed line, also known as "curly bracket": { or } connecting two or more words or lines, which are to be considered together, such as in {role, roll}; in music, used to connect staves.

Embracenoun

Hug noun; putting arms around someone.

ADVERTISEMENT

Bracenoun

A pair, a couple; originally used of dogs, and later of animals generally and then other things, but rarely human persons. (The plural in this sense is unchanged.) In British use (as plural), this is a particularly common reference to game birds.

Embracenoun

Enclosure, (partially or fully) surrounding someone or something.

Bracenoun

A piece of material used to transmit, or change the direction of, weight or pressure; any one of the pieces, in a frame or truss, which divide the structure into triangular parts. It may act as a tie, or as a strut, and serves to prevent distortion of the structure, and transverse strains in its members. A boiler brace is a diagonal stay, connecting the head with the shell.

Embracenoun

Full acceptance (of something).

Bracenoun

(nautical) A rope reeved through a block at the end of a yard, by which the yard is moved horizontally; also, a rudder gudgeon.

Embracenoun

(figuratively) Enfolding, including.

Bracenoun

The mouth of a shaft.

Embraceverb

To fasten on, as armor.

Bracenoun

Straps or bands to sustain trousers; suspenders.

Embraceverb

To clasp in the arms with affection; to take in the arms; to hug.

‘I will embrace him with a soldier's arm,That he shall shrink under my courtesy.’; ‘Paul called unto him the disciples, and embraced them.’;

Bracenoun

(plural in the US, singular or plural in the UK) A system of wires, brackets, and elastic bands used to correct crooked teeth or to reduce overbite.

Embraceverb

To cling to; to cherish; to love.

Bracenoun

(soccer) Two goals scored by one player in a game.

Embraceverb

To seize eagerly, or with alacrity; to accept with cordiality; to welcome.

‘What is there that he may not embrace for truth?’;

Braceverb

To prepare for something bad, such as an impact or blow.

‘All hands, brace for impact!’; ‘Brace yourself!’; ‘The boy has no idea about everything that's been going on. You need to brace him for what's about to happen.’;

Embraceverb

To encircle; to encompass; to inclose.

‘Low at his feet a spacious plain is placed,Between the mountain and the stream embraced.’;

Braceverb

To place in a position for resisting pressure; to hold firmly.

‘He braced himself against the crowd.’;

Embraceverb

To include as parts of a whole; to comprehend; to take in; as, natural philosophy embraces many sciences.

‘Not that my song, in such a scanty space,So large a subject fully can embrace.’;

Braceverb

(nautical) To swing round the yards of a square rigged ship, using braces, to present a more efficient sail surface to the direction of the wind.

‘to brace the yards’;

Embraceverb

To accept; to undergo; to submit to.

Braceverb

To stop someone for questioning, usually said of police.

Embraceverb

To attempt to influence corruptly, as a jury or court.

Braceverb

To confront with questions, demands or requests.

Embraceverb

To join in an embrace.

Braceverb

To furnish with braces; to support; to prop.

‘to brace a beam in a building’;

Embracenoun

Intimate or close encircling with the arms; pressure to the bosom; clasp; hug.

‘We stood tranced in long embraces,Mixed with kisses.’;

Braceverb

To draw tight; to tighten; to put in a state of tension; to strain; to strengthen.

‘to brace the nerves’;

Embracenoun

the act of clasping another person in the arms (as in greeting or affection)

Braceverb

To bind or tie closely; to fasten tightly.

Embracenoun

the state of taking in or encircling;

‘an island in the embrace of the sea’;

Bracenoun

That which holds anything tightly or supports it firmly; a bandage or a prop.

Embracenoun

a close affectionate and protective acceptance;

‘his willing embrace of new ideas’; ‘in the bosom of the family’;

Bracenoun

A cord, ligament, or rod, for producing or maintaining tension, as a cord on the side of a drum.

‘The little bones of the ear drum do in straining and relaxing it as the braces of the war drum do in that.’;

Embraceverb

include in scope; include as part of something broader; have as one's sphere or territory;

‘This group encompasses a wide range of people from different backgrounds’; ‘this should cover everyone in the group’;

Bracenoun

The state of being braced or tight; tension.

‘The laxness of the tympanum, when it has lost its brace or tension.’;

Embraceverb

hug, usually with fondness;

‘Hug me, please’; ‘They embraced’;

Bracenoun

A piece of material used to transmit, or change the direction of, weight or pressure; any one of the pieces, in a frame or truss, which divide the structure into triangular parts. It may act as a tie, or as a strut, and serves to prevent distortion of the structure, and transverse strains in its members. A boiler brace is a diagonal stay, connecting the head with the shell.

Embraceverb

take up the cause, ideology, practice, method, of someone and use it as one's own;

‘She embraced Catholocism’; ‘They adopted the Jewish faith’;

Bracenoun

A vertical curved line connecting two or more words or lines, which are to be taken together; thus, boll, bowl; or, in music, used to connect staves.

Bracenoun

A rope reeved through a block at the end of a yard, by which the yard is moved horizontally; also, a rudder gudgeon.

Bracenoun

A curved instrument or handle of iron or wood, for holding and turning bits, etc.; a bitstock.

Bracenoun

A pair; a couple; as, a brace of ducks; now rarely applied to persons, except familiarly or with some contempt.

‘He is said to have shot . . . fifty brace of pheasants.’; ‘A brace of brethren, both bishops, both eminent for learning and religion, now appeared in the church.’; ‘But you, my brace of lords.’;

Bracenoun

Straps or bands to sustain trousers; suspenders.

‘I embroidered for you a beautiful pair of braces.’;

Bracenoun

Harness; warlike preparation.

‘For that it stands not in such warlike brace.’;

Bracenoun

Armor for the arm; vantbrace.

Bracenoun

The mouth of a shaft.

Braceverb

To furnish with braces; to support; to prop; as, to brace a beam in a building.

Braceverb

To draw tight; to tighten; to put in a state of tension; to strain; to strengthen; as, to brace the nerves.

‘And welcome war to brace her drums.’;

Braceverb

To bind or tie closely; to fasten tightly.

‘The women of China, by bracing and binding them from their infancy, have very little feet.’; ‘Some who spurs had first braced on.’;

Braceverb

To place in a position for resisting pressure; to hold firmly; as, he braced himself against the crowd.

‘A sturdy lance in his right hand he braced.’;

Braceverb

To move around by means of braces; as, to brace the yards.

Braceverb

To get tone or vigor; to rouse one's energies; - with up.

Bracenoun

a support that steadies or strengthens something else;

‘he wore a brace on his knee’;

Bracenoun

two items of the same kind

Bracenoun

a set of two similar things considered as a unit

Bracenoun

either of two punctuation marks ({ or }) used to enclose textual material

Bracenoun

a rope on a square-rigged ship that is used to swing a yard about and secure it

Bracenoun

elastic straps that hold trousers up (usually used in the plural)

Bracenoun

an appliance that corrects dental irregularities

Bracenoun

the stock of a tool used for turning a drilling bit

Bracenoun

a structural member used to stiffen a framework

Braceverb

prepare (oneself) for something unpleasant or difficult

Braceverb

support or hold steady and make steadfast, with or as if with a brace;

‘brace your elbows while working on the potter's wheel’;

Braceverb

support by bracing

Braceverb

cause to be alert and energetic;

‘Coffee and tea stimulate me’; ‘This herbal infusion doesn't stimulate’;

Bracenoun

a device fitted to something, in particular a weak or injured part of the body, to give support

‘a neck brace’;

Bracenoun

a strengthening piece of iron or timber used in building or carpentry.

Bracenoun

a wire device fitted in the mouth to straighten the teeth.

Bracenoun

a drilling tool with a crank handle and a socket to hold a bit.

Bracenoun

a rope attached to the yard of a ship for trimming the sail.

Bracenoun

a pair of straps that pass over the shoulders and fasten to the top of trousers at the front and back to hold them up.

Bracenoun

a pair of something, typically of birds or mammals killed in hunting

‘thirty brace of grouse’;

Bracenoun

either of the two marks { and }, used either to indicate that two or more items on one side have the same relationship as each other to the single item to which the other side points, or in pairs to show that words between them are connected.

Bracenoun

a similar mark connecting staves to be performed at the same time.

Braceverb

make (a structure) stronger or firmer with wood, iron, or other forms of support

‘the posts were braced by lengths of timber’;

Braceverb

press (one's body or part of one's body) firmly against something in order to stay balanced

‘she braced her feet against a projecting shelf’; ‘he stood with legs braced’;

Braceverb

prepare (someone) for something difficult or unpleasant

‘both stations are bracing themselves for job losses’;

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons