VS.

Belt vs. Whip

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Beltnoun

A band worn around the waist to hold clothing to one's body (usually pants), hold weapons (such as a gun or sword), or serve as a decorative piece of clothing.

‘As part of the act, the fat clown's belt broke, causing his pants to fall down.’;

Whipnoun

A lash; a pliant, flexible instrument, such as a rod (commonly of cane or rattan) or a plaited or braided rope or thong (commonly of leather) used to create a sharp "crack" sound for directing or herding animals.

‘I had to use the whip to get the sheep's attention.’;

Beltnoun

A band used as a restraint for safety purposes, such as a seat belt.

‘Keep your belt fastened; this is going to be quite a bumpy ride.’;

Whipnoun

The same instrument used to strike a person or animal for corporal punishment or torture.

‘Once he ran out of appeals, he knew he would soon feel the sting of the whip.’;

Beltnoun

A band that is used in a machine to help transfer motion or power.

‘The motor had a single belt that snaked its way back and forth around a variety of wheels.’;

Whipnoun

(hunting) A whipper-in.

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Beltnoun

Anything that resembles a belt, or that encircles or crosses like a belt; a strip or stripe.

‘a belt of trees; a belt of sand’;

Whipnoun

(politics) A member of a political party who is in charge of enforcing the party's policies in votes.

‘I was going to vote against the bill, but the party whip came to see me and made it clear I needed to vote for it.’;

Beltnoun

A trophy in the shape of a belt, generally awarded for martial arts.

‘the heavyweight belt’;

Whipnoun

A document distributed weekly to MPs by party whips informing them of upcoming votes in parliament.

Beltnoun

(astronomy) A collection of rocky-constituted bodies (such as asteroids) which orbit a star.

Whipnoun

Whipped cream.

‘Did you want to add some whip to your coffee, ma'am?’;

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Beltnoun

(astronomy) One of certain girdles or zones on the surface of the planets Jupiter and Saturn, supposed to be of the nature of clouds.

Whipnoun

(nautical) A purchase in which one block is used to gain a 2:1 mechanical advantage.

Beltnoun

A powerful blow, often made with a fist or heavy object.

‘After the bouncer gave him a solid belt to the gut, Simon had suddenly had enough of barfighting.’;

Whipnoun

(African American Vernacular English) A mode of personal motorized transportation; an automobile, all makes and models including motorcycles, excluding public transportation.

‘Come on, let's take my whip so we can get there in time.’;

Beltnoun

A quick drink of liquor.

‘Care to join me in a belt of scotch?’;

Whipnoun

(roller derby) A move in which one player transfers momentum to another.

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Beltnoun

A geographical region known for a particular product, feature or demographic (Corn Belt, Bible Belt, Black Belt, Green Belt).

Whipnoun

A whipping motion; a thrashing about.

‘I was startled by the whip of the rope when it finally snapped.’;

Beltnoun

(baseball) The part of the strike zone at the height of the batter's waist.

‘That umpire called that pitch a strike at the belt.’;

Whipnoun

The quality of being whiplike or flexible; suppleness, as of the shaft of a golf club.

Beltnoun

(weapons) device that holds and feeds cartridges into a belt-fed weapon

Whipnoun

Any of various pieces that operate with a quick vibratory motion

Beltverb

(transitive) To encircle.

‘The small town was belted by cornfields in all directions.’;

Whipnoun

A spring in certain electrical devices for making a circuit

Beltverb

(transitive) To fasten a belt on.

‘Edgar belted himself in and turned the car's ignition.’; ‘The rotund man had difficulty belting his pants, and generally wore suspenders to avoid the issue.’;

Whipnoun

(music) A wippen, a rocking component in certain piano actions.

Beltverb

(transitive) To invest (a person) with a belt as part of a formal ceremony such as knighthood.

Whipverb

(transitive) To hit with a whip.

‘The rider whipped the horse.’;

Beltverb

(transitive) To hit with a belt.

‘The child was misbehaving so he was belted as punishment.’;

Whipverb

To hit with any flexible object.

‘I whipped her with a newspaper.’;

Beltverb

(transitive) To scream or sing in a loud manner.

‘He belted out the national anthem.’;

Whipverb

To defeat, as in a contest or game.

Beltverb

(transitive) To drink quickly, often in gulps.

‘He belted down a shot of whisky.’;

Whipverb

(transitive) To mix in a rapid aerating fashion, especially food.

‘to whip eggs or cream’;

Beltverb

To hit someone or something.

‘The angry player belted the official across the face, and as a result was ejected from the game.’;

Whipverb

(transitive) To urge into action.

‘He whipped the department into shape.’;

Beltverb

To hit a pitched ball a long distance, usually for a home run.

‘He belted that pitch over the grandstand.’;

Whipverb

To bind the end of a rope with twine or other small stuff to prevent its unlaying: fraying or unravelling.

Beltverb

(intransitive) To move very fast

‘He was really belting along.’;

Whipverb

To hoist or purchase by means of a whip.

Beltnoun

That which engirdles a person or thing; a band or girdle; as, a lady's belt; a sword belt.

‘The shining belt with gold inlaid.’;

Whipverb

To sew lightly; specifically, to form (a fabric) into gathers by loosely overcasting the rolled edge and drawing up the thread.

‘to whip a ruffle’;

Beltnoun

That which restrains or confines as a girdle.

‘He cannot buckle his distempered causeWithin the belt of rule.’;

Whipverb

(transitive) To throw or kick an object at a high velocity.

Beltnoun

Anything that resembles a belt, or that encircles or crosses like a belt; a strip or stripe; as, a belt of trees; a belt of sand.

Whipverb

(transitive) To fish a body of water especially by making repeated casts.

Beltnoun

Same as Band, n., 2. A very broad band is more properly termed a belt.

Whipverb

(intransitive) To snap back and forth like a whip.

Beltnoun

One of certain girdles or zones on the surface of the planets Jupiter and Saturn, supposed to be of the nature of clouds.

Whipverb

(intransitive) To move very fast.

Beltnoun

A narrow passage or strait; as, the Great Belt and the Lesser Belt, leading to the Baltic Sea.

Whipverb

(transitive) To move (something) very fast; often with up, out, etc.

Beltnoun

A token or badge of knightly rank.

Whipverb

To transfer momentum from one skater to another.

Beltnoun

A band of leather, or other flexible substance, passing around two wheels, and communicating motion from one to the other.

Whipverb

(figurative) To lash with sarcasm, abuse, etc.

Beltnoun

A band or stripe, as of color, round any organ; or any circular ridge or series of ridges.

Whipverb

To thrash; to beat out, as grain, by striking.

‘to whip wheat’;

Beltverb

To encircle with, or as with, a belt; to encompass; to surround.

‘A coarse black robe belted round the waist.’; ‘They belt him round with hearts undaunted.’;

Whipverb

To strike with a lash, a cord, a rod, or anything slender and lithe; to lash; to beat; as, to whip a horse, or a carpet.

Beltverb

To shear, as the buttocks and tails of sheep.

Whipverb

To drive with lashes or strokes of a whip; to cause to rotate by lashing with a cord; as, to whip a top.

Beltnoun

endless loop of flexible material between two rotating shafts or pulleys

Whipverb

To punish with a whip, scourge, or rod; to flog; to beat; as, to whip a vagrant; to whip one with thirty nine lashes; to whip a perverse boy.

‘Who, for false quantities, was whipped at school.’;

Beltnoun

a band to tie or buckle around the body (usually at the waist)

Whipverb

To apply that which hurts keenly to; to lash, as with sarcasm, abuse, or the like; to apply cutting language to.

‘They would whip me with their fine wits.’;

Beltnoun

an elongated region where a specific condition is found;

‘a belt of high pressure’;

Whipverb

To thrash; to beat out, as grain, by striking; as, to whip wheat.

Beltnoun

a vigorous blow;

‘the sudden knock floored him’; ‘he took a bash right in his face’; ‘he got a bang on the head’;

Whipverb

To beat (eggs, cream, or the like) into a froth, as with a whisk, fork, or the like.

Beltnoun

a path or strip (as cut by one course of mowing)

Whipverb

To conquer; to defeat, as in a contest or game; to beat; to surpass.

Beltnoun

the act of hitting vigorously;

‘he gave the table a whack’;

Whipverb

To overlay (a cord, rope, or the like) with other cords going round and round it; to overcast, as the edge of a seam; to wrap; - often with about, around, or over.

‘Its string is firmly whipped about with small gut.’;

Beltverb

sing loudly and forcefully

Whipverb

To sew lightly; specifically, to form (a fabric) into gathers by loosely overcasting the rolled edge and drawing up the thread; as, to whip a ruffle.

‘In half-whipped muslin needles useless lie.’;

Beltverb

deliver a blow to;

‘He belted his opponent’;

Whipverb

To take or move by a sudden motion; to jerk; to snatch; - with into, out, up, off, and the like.

‘She, in a hurry, whips up her darling under her arm.’; ‘He whips out his pocketbook every moment, and writes descriptions of everything he sees.’;

Beltverb

fasten with a belt;

‘belt your trousers’;

Whipverb

To hoist or purchase by means of a whip.

Whipverb

To fish (a body of water) with a rod and artificial fly, the motion being that employed in using a whip.

‘Whipping their rough surface for a trout.’;

Whipverb

To move nimbly; to start or turn suddenly and do something; to whisk; as, he whipped around the corner.

‘With speed from thence he whipped.’; ‘Two friends, traveling, met a bear upon the way; the one whips up a tree, and the other throws himself flat upon the ground.’;

Whipnoun

An instrument or driving horses or other animals, or for correction, consisting usually of a lash attached to a handle, or of a handle and lash so combined as to form a flexible rod.

‘In his right hand he holds a whip, with which he is supposed to drive the horses of the sun.’;

Whipnoun

A coachman; a driver of a carriage; as, a good whip.

Whipnoun

One of the arms or frames of a windmill, on which the sails are spread.

Whipnoun

A small tackle with a single rope, used to hoist light bodies.

Whipnoun

A huntsman who whips in the hounds; whipper-in.

Whipnoun

A person (as a member of Parliament) appointed to enforce party discipline, and secure the attendance of the members of a Parliament party at any important session, especially when their votes are needed.

Whipnoun

A whipping motion; a thrashing about; as, the whip of a tense rope or wire which has suddenly parted; also, the quality of being whiplike or flexible; flexibility; suppleness, as of the shaft of a golf club.

Whipnoun

Any of various pieces that operate with a quick vibratory motion, as a spring in certain electrical devices for making a circuit, or a rocking certain piano actions.

Whipnoun

an instrument with a handle and a flexible lash that is used for whipping

Whipnoun

a legislator appointed by the party to enforce discipline

Whipnoun

a dessert made of sugar and stiffly beaten egg whites or cream and usually flavored with fruit

Whipnoun

(golf) the flexibility of the shaft of a golf club

Whipnoun

a quick blow with a whip

Whipverb

beat severely with a whip or rod;

‘The teacher often flogged the students’; ‘The children were severely trounced’;

Whipverb

defeat thoroughly;

‘He mopped up the floor with his opponents’;

Whipverb

thrash about flexibly in the manner of a whiplash;

‘The tall grass whipped in the wind’;

Whipverb

strike as if by whipping;

‘The curtain whipped her face’;

Whipverb

whip with or as if with a wire whisk;

‘whisk the eggs’;

Whipverb

subject to harsh criticism;

‘The Senator blistered the administration in his speech on Friday’; ‘the professor scaled the students’; ‘your invectives scorched the community’;

Whip

A whip is a tool designed to strike humans or other animals to exert control through pain compliance or fear of pain. They can also be used without inflicting pain, for audiovisual cues, such as in equestrianism.

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