VS.

Balcony vs. Deck

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Balconynoun

(architectural element) An accessible structure extending from a building, especially outside a window.

Decknoun

Any raised flat surface that can be walked on: a balcony; a porch; a raised patio; a flat rooftop.

Balconynoun

An accessible structure overlooking a stage or the like.

Decknoun

(nautical) The floorlike covering of the horizontal sections, or compartments, of a ship. Small vessels have only one deck; larger ships have two or three decks.

‘to swab the deck’;

Balconynoun

A platform projecting from the wall of a building, usually resting on brackets or consoles, and inclosed by a parapet; as, a balcony in front of a window. Also, a projecting gallery in places of amusement; as, the balcony in a theater.

Decknoun

(aviation) A main aeroplane surface, especially of a biplane or multiplane.

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Balconynoun

A projecting gallery once common at the stern of large ships.

Decknoun

(cards) A pack or set of playing cards.

Balconynoun

an upper floor projecting from the rear over the main floor in an auditorium

Decknoun

A set of cards owned by each individual player and from which they draw when playing.

Balconynoun

a platform projecting from the wall of a building and surrounded by a balustrade or railing or parapet

Decknoun

A set of slides for a presentation.

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Balcony

A balcony (from Italian: balcone, ) is a platform projecting from the wall of a building, supported by columns or console brackets, and enclosed with a balustrade, usually above the ground floor.

‘scaffold’;

Decknoun

(obsolete) A heap or store.

Deckverb

(uncommon) To furnish with a deck, as a vessel.

Deckverb

(informal) To knock someone to the floor, especially with a single punch.

‘Wow, did you see her deck that guy who pinched her?’;

Deckverb

(card games) To cause a player to run out of cards to draw and usually lose the game as a result.

Deckverb

To dress (someone) up, to clothe with more than ordinary elegance

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Deckverb

To decorate (something).

Deckverb

To cover; to overspread.

Deckverb

To cover; to overspread.

‘To deck with clouds the uncolored sky.’;

Deckverb

To dress, as the person; to clothe; especially, to clothe with more than ordinary elegance; to array; to adorn; to embellish.

‘Deck thyself now with majesty and excellency.’; ‘And deck my body in gay ornaments.’; ‘The dew with spangles decked the ground.’;

Deckverb

To furnish with a deck, as a vessel.

Deckverb

to knock down (a person) with a forceful blow; as, He decked his opponent with a single punch.

Decknoun

The floorlike covering of the horizontal sections, or compartments, of a ship. Small vessels have only one deck; larger ships have two or three decks.

Decknoun

The upper part or top of a mansard roof or curb roof when made nearly flat.

Decknoun

The roof of a passenger car.

Decknoun

A pack or set of playing cards.

‘The king was slyly fingered from the deck.’;

Decknoun

A heap or store.

‘Who . . . hath such trinketsReady in the deck.’;

Decknoun

A main aëroplane surface, esp. of a biplane or multiplane.

Decknoun

the portion of a bridge which serves as the roadway.

Decknoun

a flat platform adjacent to a house, usually without a roof; - it is typically used for relaxing out of doors, outdoor cooking, or entertaining guests.

Decknoun

any of various floor-like platforms built into a vessel

Decknoun

street name for a packet of illegal drugs

Decknoun

a pack of 52 playing cards

Decknoun

a porch that resembles the deck on a ship

Deckverb

be beautiful to look at;

‘Flowers adorned the tables everywhere’;

Deckverb

decorate;

‘deck the halls with holly’;

Deckverb

knock down with force;

‘He decked his opponent’;

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