VS.

Aim vs. Objective

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Aimnoun

The pointing of a weapon, as a gun, a dart, or an arrow, or object, in the line of direction with the object intended to be struck; the line of fire; the direction of anything, such as a spear, a blow, a discourse, a remark, towards a particular point or object, with a view to strike or affect it.

‘Take time with the aim of your gun.’; ‘to take aim’;

Objectiveadjective

Of or relating to a material object, actual existence or reality.

Aimnoun

The point intended to be hit, or object intended to be attained or affected.

Objectiveadjective

Not influenced by the emotions or prejudices.

Aimnoun

Intention or goal

‘My number one aim in life is to make money to make my parents, siblings and kids happy.’;

Objectiveadjective

Based on observed facts.

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Aimnoun

The ability of someone to aim straight; one's faculty for being able to hit a physical target

‘The police officer has excellent aim, always hitting the bullseye in shooting practice.’;

Objectiveadjective

(grammar) Of, or relating to a noun or pronoun used as the object of a verb.

Aimnoun

(obsolete) Conjecture; guess.

Objectiveadjective

Of, or relating to verbal conjugation that indicates the object (patient) of an action. In linguistic descriptions of Tundra Nenets, among others.

Aimverb

(intransitive) To point or direct a missile, or a weapon which propels as missile, towards an object or spot with the intent of hitting it

‘He aimed at the target, but the arrow flew straight over it.’;

Objectivenoun

A material object that physically exists.

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Aimverb

(intransitive) To direct the intention or purpose; to attempt the accomplishment of a purpose; to try to gain; to endeavor;—followed by at, or by an infinitive

‘to aim at a pass’; ‘to aim to do well in life’;

Objectivenoun

A goal that is striven for.

Aimverb

(transitive) To direct or point (e.g. a weapon), at a particular object; to direct, as a missile, an act, or a proceeding, at, to, or against an object

‘to aim an arrow at the deer’; ‘She aimed a punch at her ex-boyfriend.’;

Objectivenoun

(grammar) The objective case.

Aimverb

(transitive) To direct (something verbal) towards a certain person, thing, or group

‘to aim a satirical comment at Communists in general’;

Objectivenoun

(grammar) a noun or pronoun in the objective case.

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Aimverb

To guess or conjecture.

Objectivenoun

The lens or lenses of a camera, microscope, or other optical device closest to the object being examined.

Aimverb

To point or direct a missile weapon, or a weapon which propels as missile, towards an object or spot with the intent of hitting it; as, to aim at a fox, or at a target.

Objectiveadjective

Of or pertaining to an object.

Aimverb

To direct the indention or purpose; to attempt the accomplishment of a purpose; to try to gain; to endeavor; - followed by at, or by an infinitive; as, to aim at distinction; to aim to do well.

‘Aim'st thou at princes?’;

Objectiveadjective

Of or pertaining to an object; contained in, or having the nature or position of, an object; outward; external; extrinsic; - an epithet applied to whatever is exterior to the mind, or which is simply an object of thought or feeling, as opposed to being related to thoughts of feelings, and opposed to subjective.

‘In the Middle Ages, subject meant substance, and has this sense in Descartes and Spinoza: sometimes, also, in Reid. Subjective is used by William of Occam to denote that which exists independent of mind; objective, what is formed by the mind. This shows what is meant by realitas objectiva in Descartes. Kant and Fichte have inverted the meanings. Subject, with them, is the mind which knows; object, that which is known; subjective, the varying conditions of the knowing mind; objective, that which is in the constant nature of the thing known.’; ‘Objective has come to mean that which has independent existence or authority, apart from our experience or thought. Thus, moral law is said to have objective authority, that is, authority belonging to itself, and not drawn from anything in our nature.’;

Aimverb

To guess or conjecture.

Objectiveadjective

Unbiased; unprejudiced; fair; uninfluenced by personal feelings or personal interests; considering only the facts of a situation unrelated to the observer; - of judgments, opinions, evaluations, conclusions, reasoning processes.

‘Objective means that which belongs to, or proceeds from, the object known, and not from the subject knowing, and thus denotes what is real, in opposition to that which is ideal - what exists in nature, in contrast to what exists merely in the thought of the individual.’;

Aimverb

To direct or point, as a weapon, at a particular object; to direct, as a missile, an act, or a proceeding, at, to, or against an object; as, to aim a musket or an arrow, the fist or a blow (at something); to aim a satire or a reflection (at some person or vice).

Objectiveadjective

Pertaining to, or designating, the case which follows a transitive verb or a preposition, being that case in which the direct object of the verb is placed. See Accusative, n.

‘My troublous dream [on] this night doth make me sad.’; ‘To write of victories [in or for] next year.’; ‘In the philosophy of mind, subjective denotes what is to be referred to the thinking subject, the ego; objective what belongs to the object of thought, the non-ego.’;

Aimnoun

The pointing of a weapon, as a gun, a dart, or an arrow, in the line of direction with the object intended to be struck; the line of fire; the direction of anything, as a spear, a blow, a discourse, a remark, towards a particular point or object, with a view to strike or affect it.

‘Each at the head leveled his deadly aim.’;

Objectivenoun

The objective case.

Aimnoun

The point intended to be hit, or object intended to be attained or affected.

‘To be the aim of every dangerous shot.’;

Objectivenoun

An object glass; called also objective lens. See under Object, n.

Aimnoun

Intention; purpose; design; scheme.

‘How oft ambitious aims are crossed!’;

Objectivenoun

Same as Objective point, under Objective, a.

Aimnoun

Conjecture; guess.

‘What you would work me to, I have some aim.’;

Objectivenoun

the goal intended to be attained (and which is believed to be attainable);

‘the sole object of her trip was to see her children’;

Aimnoun

an anticipated outcome that is intended or that guides your planned actions;

‘his intent was to provide a new translation’; ‘good intentions are not enough’; ‘it was created with the conscious aim of answering immediate needs’; ‘he made no secret of his designs’;

Objectivenoun

the lens or system of lenses nearest the object being viewed

Aimnoun

the goal intended to be attained (and which is believed to be attainable);

‘the sole object of her trip was to see her children’;

Objectiveadjective

undistorted by emotion or personal bias; based on observable phenomena;

‘an objective appraisal’; ‘objective evidence’;

Aimnoun

the action of directing something at an object;

‘he took aim and fired’;

Objectiveadjective

serving as or indicating the object of a verb or of certain prepositions and used for certain other purposes;

‘objective case’; ‘accusative endings’;

Aimnoun

the direction or path along which something moves or along which it lies

Objectiveadjective

emphasizing or expressing things as perceived without distortion of personal feelings or interpretation;

‘objective art’;

Aimverb

aim or direct at; as of blows, weapons, or objects such as photographic equipment;

‘Please don't aim at your little brother!’; ‘He trained his gun on the burglar’; ‘Don't train your camera on the women’; ‘Take a swipe at one's opponent’;

Objectiveadjective

belonging to immediate experience of actual things or events;

‘concrete benefits’; ‘a concrete example’; ‘there is no objective evidence of anything of the kind’;

Aimverb

propose or intend;

‘I aim to arrive at noon’;

Aimverb

move into a desired direction of discourse;

‘What are you driving at?’;

Aimverb

specifically design a product, event, or activity for a certain public

Aimverb

intend (something) to move towards a certain goal;

‘He aimed his fists towards his opponent's face’; ‘criticism directed at her superior’; ‘direct your anger towards others, not towards yourself’;

Aimverb

direct (a remark) toward an intended goal;

‘She wanted to aim a pun’;

Aimverb

have an ambitious plan or a lofty goal

Aimverb

point or direct (a weapon or camera) at a target

‘aim for the middle of the target’; ‘aim the camcorder at some suitable object’;

Aimverb

direct (a missile or blow) at someone or something

‘she had aimed the bottle at Gary's head’;

Aimverb

direct information, a product, or an action towards (a particular group)

‘the TV campaign is aimed at the 16–24 age group’;

Aimverb

have the intention of achieving

‘we aim to give you the best possible service’; ‘the programme will aim at deepening understanding’;

Aimnoun

a purpose or intention; a desired outcome

‘our primary aim is to achieve financial discipline’;

Aimnoun

the directing of a weapon or missile at a target

‘his aim was perfect’;

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