VS.

Abate vs. Pacify

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Abateverb

To put an end to; to cause to cease.

‘to abate a nuisance’;

Pacifyverb

(transitive) To bring peace to (a place or situation), by ending war, fighting, violence, anger or agitation.

Abateverb

(intransitive) To become null and void.

‘The writ has abated.’;

Pacifyverb

(transitive) To appease (someone).

Abateverb

To nullify; make void.

‘to abate a writ’;

Pacifyverb

To make to be at peace; to appease; to calm; to still; to quiet; to allay the agitation, excitement, or resentment of; to tranquillize; as, to pacify a man when angry; to pacify pride, appetite, or importunity.

‘To pacify and settle those countries.’;

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Abateverb

To humble; to lower in status; to bring someone down physically or mentally.

Pacifyverb

cause to be more favorably inclined; gain the good will of;

‘She managed to mollify the angry customer’;

Abateverb

To be humbled; to be brought down physically or mentally.

Pacifyverb

fight violence and try to establish peace in (a location);

‘The U.N. troops are working to pacify Bosnia’;

Abateverb

To curtail; to deprive.

‘Order restrictions and prohibitions to abate an emergency situation.’;

Pacifyverb

quell the anger, agitation, or excitement of

‘he had to pacify angry spectators’;

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Abateverb

(transitive) To reduce in amount, size, or value.

‘Legacies are liable to be abated entirely or in proportion, upon a deficiency of assets.’;

Pacifyverb

bring peace to (a country or warring factions), especially by the use or threat of military force

‘the general pacified northern Italy’;

Abateverb

(intransitive) To decrease in size, value, or amount.

Abateverb

(transitive) To moderate; to lessen in force, intensity, to subside.

Abateverb

(intransitive) To decrease in intensity or force; to subside.

Abateverb

(transitive) To deduct or omit.

‘We will abate this price from the total.’;

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Abateverb

(transitive) To bar or except.

Abateverb

(transitive) To cut away or hammer down, in such a way as to leave a figure in relief, as a sculpture, or in metalwork.

Abateverb

To dull the edge or point of; to blunt.

Abateverb

To destroy, or level to the ground.

Abateverb

to enter a tenement without permission after the owner has died and before the heir takes possession.

Abatenoun

Abatement.

Abatenoun

an Italian abbot, or other member of the clergy.

Abateverb

To beat down; to overthrow.

‘The King of Scots . . . sore abated the walls.’;

Abateverb

To bring down or reduce from a higher to a lower state, number, or degree; to lessen; to diminish; to contract; to moderate; to cut short; as, to abate a demand; to abate pride, zeal, hope.

‘His eye was not dim, nor his natural force abated.’;

Abateverb

To deduct; to omit; as, to abate something from a price.

‘Nine thousand parishes, abating the odd hundreds.’;

Abateverb

To blunt.

‘To abate the edge of envy.’;

Abateverb

To reduce in estimation; to deprive.

‘She hath abated me of half my train.’;

Abateverb

To bring entirely down or put an end to; to do away with; as, to abate a nuisance, to abate a writ.

Abateverb

To decrease, or become less in strength or violence; as, pain abates, a storm abates.

‘The fury of Glengarry . . . rapidly abated.’;

Abateverb

To be defeated, or come to naught; to fall through; to fail; as, a writ abates.

Abatenoun

Abatement.

Abateverb

make less active or intense

Abateverb

become less in amount or intensity;

‘The storm abated’; ‘The rain let up after a few hours’;

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