VS.

Will vs. Intellect

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Willverb

To wish, desire (something).

‘Do what you will.’;

Intellectnoun

the faculty of thinking, judging, abstract reasoning, and conceptual understanding; the cognitive faculty (uncountable)

‘Intellect is one of man's greatest powers.’;

Willverb

To wish or desire (that something happen); to intend (that).

Intellectnoun

the capacity of that faculty (in a particular person) (uncountable)

‘They were chosen because of their outstanding intellect.’;

Willverb

(auxiliary) To habitually do (a given action).

Intellectnoun

a person who has that faculty to a great degree

‘Some of the world's leading intellects were meeting there.’;

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Willverb

(auxiliary) To choose to (do something), used to express intention but without any temporal connotations (+ bare infinitive).

Intellectnoun

The part or faculty of the human mind by which it knows, as distinguished from the power to feel and to will; the power to judge and comprehend; the thinking faculty; the understanding.

Willverb

(auxiliary) Used to express the future tense, sometimes with some implication of volition when used in the first person. Compare shall.

Intellectnoun

The capacity for higher forms of knowledge, as distinguished from the power to perceive objects in their relations; mental capacity.

Willverb

(auxiliary) To be able to, to have the capacity to.

‘Unfortunately, only one of these gloves will actually fit over my hand.’;

Intellectnoun

A particular mind, especially a person of high intelligence; as, he was a great intellect.

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Willverb

(archaic) To wish, desire.

Intellectnoun

knowledge and intellectual ability;

‘he reads to improve his mind’; ‘he has a keen intellect’;

Willverb

To instruct (that something be done) in one's will.

Intellectnoun

the capacity for rational thought or inference or discrimination;

‘we are told that man is endowed with reason and capable of distinguishing good from evil’;

Willverb

(transitive) To try to make (something) happen by using one's will (intention).

‘All the fans were willing their team to win the game.’;

Intellectnoun

a person who uses the mind creatively

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Willverb

(transitive) To bequeath (something) to someone in one's will (legal document).

‘He willed his stamp collection to the local museum.’;

Intellect

In the study of the human mind, intellect refers to and identifies the ability of the mind to reach correct conclusions about what is true and what is false, and about how to solve problems. The term intellect derives from the Ancient Greek philosophy term nous, which translates to the Latin intellectus (from intelligere, “to understand”) and into the French and English languages as intelligence.

Willnoun

One's independent faculty of choice; the ability to be able to exercise one's choice or intention.

‘Of course, man's will is often regulated by his reason.’;

Willnoun

One's intention or decision; someone's orders or commands.

‘Eventually I submitted to my parents' will.’;

Willnoun

The act of choosing to do something; a person’s conscious intent or volition.

‘Most creatures have a will to live.’;

Willnoun

A formal declaration of one's intent concerning the disposal of one's property and holdings after death; the legal document stating such wishes.

Willnoun

(archaic) That which is desired; one's wish.

Willnoun

(archaic) Desire, longing. (Now generally merged with later senses.)

‘He felt a great will to make a pilgrimage to the Holy Land.’;

Willnoun

The power of choosing; the faculty or endowment of the soul by which it is capable of choosing; the faculty or power of the mind by which we decide to do or not to do; the power or faculty of preferring or selecting one of two or more objects.

‘It is necessary to form a distinct notion of what is meant by the word "volition" in order to understand the import of the word will, for this last word expresses the power of mind of which "volition" is the act.’; ‘Will is an ambiguous word, being sometimes put for the faculty of willing; sometimes for the act of that faculty, besides [having] other meanings. But "volition" always signifies the act of willing, and nothing else.’; ‘Appetite is the will's solicitor, and the will is appetite's controller; what we covet according to the one, by the other we often reject.’; ‘The will is plainly that by which the mind chooses anything.’;

Willnoun

The choice which is made; a determination or preference which results from the act or exercise of the power of choice; a volition.

‘The word "will," however, is not always used in this its proper acceptation, but is frequently substituted for "volition", as when I say that my hand mover in obedience to my will.’;

Willnoun

The choice or determination of one who has authority; a decree; a command; discretionary pleasure.

‘Thy will be done.’; ‘Our prayers should be according to the will of God.’;

Willnoun

Strong wish or inclination; desire; purpose.

‘My poverty, but not my will, consents; . . . Put this in any liquid thing you will,And drink it off.’;

Willnoun

That which is strongly wished or desired.

‘What's your will, good friar?’; ‘The mariner hath his will.’;

Willnoun

Arbitrary disposal; power to control, dispose, or determine.

‘Deliver me not over unto the will of mine enemies.’;

Willnoun

The legal declaration of a person's mind as to the manner in which he would have his property or estate disposed of after his death; the written instrument, legally executed, by which a man makes disposition of his estate, to take effect after his death; testament; devise. See the Note under Testament, 1.

Willverb

To wish; to desire; to incline to have.

‘A wife as of herself no thing ne sholde [should]Wille in effect, but as her husband wolde [would].’; ‘Caleb said unto her, What will thou ?’; ‘They would none of my counsel.’;

Willverb

As an auxiliary, will is used to denote futurity dependent on the verb. Thus, in first person, "I will" denotes willingness, consent, promise; and when "will" is emphasized, it denotes determination or fixed purpose; as, I will go if you wish; I will go at all hazards. In the second and third persons, the idea of distinct volition, wish, or purpose is evanescent, and simple certainty is appropriately expressed; as, "You will go," or "He will go," describes a future event as a fact only. To emphasize will denotes (according to the tone or context) certain futurity or fixed determination.

‘I am able to devote as much time and attention to other subjects as I will [shall] be under the necessity of doing next winter.’; ‘A countryman, telling us what he had seen, remarked that if the conflagration went on, as it was doing, we would [should] have, as our next season's employment, the Old Town of Edinburgh to rebuild.’; ‘I feel assured that I will [shall] not have the misfortune to find conflicting views held by one so enlightened as your excellency.’;

Willverb

To be willing; to be inclined or disposed; to be pleased; to wish; to desire.

‘And behold, there came a leper and worshiped him, saying, Lord if thou wilt, thou canst make me clean. And Jesus . . . touched him, saying, I will; be thou clean.’;

Willverb

To form a distinct volition of; to determine by an act of choice; to ordain; to decree.

‘By all law and reason, that which the Parliament will not, is no more established in this kingdom.’; ‘Two things he [God] willeth, that we should be good, and that we should be happy.’;

Willverb

To enjoin or command, as that which is determined by an act of volition; to direct; to order.

‘They willed me say so, madam.’; ‘Send for music,And will the cooks to use their best of cunningTo please the palate.’; ‘As you go, will the lord mayor . . . To attend our further pleasure presently.’;

Willverb

To give or direct the disposal of by testament; to bequeath; to devise; as, to will one's estate to a child; also, to order or direct by testament; as, he willed that his nephew should have his watch.

Willverb

To exercise an act of volition; to choose; to decide; to determine; to decree.

‘At Winchester he lies, so himself willed.’; ‘He that shall turn his thoughts inward upon what passes in his own mind when he wills.’; ‘I contend for liberty as it signifies a power in man to do as he wills or pleases.’;

Willnoun

the capability of conscious choice and decision and intention;

‘the exercise of their volition we construe as revolt’;

Willnoun

a fixed and persistent intent or purpose;

‘where there's a will there's a way’;

Willnoun

a legal document declaring a person's wishes regarding the disposal of their property when they die

Willverb

decree or ordain;

‘God wills our existence’;

Willverb

have in mind;

‘I will take the exam tomorrow’;

Willverb

determine by choice;

‘This action was willed and intended’;

Willverb

leave or give by will after one's death;

‘My aunt bequeathed me all her jewelry’; ‘My grandfather left me his entire estate’;

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