Temple vs. Mosque - What's the difference?

Main Difference

The main difference between Temple and Mosque is that the Temple is a structure reserved for religious or spiritual activities and Mosque is a place of worship for followers of Islam.

Wikipedia

  • Temple

    A temple (from the Latin word templum) is a structure reserved for religious or spiritual rituals and activities such as prayer and sacrifice. It is typically used for such buildings belonging to all faiths where a more specific term such as church, mosque or synagogue is not generally used in English. These include Hinduism, Buddhism, and Jainism among religions with many modern followers, as well as other ancient religions such as Ancient Egyptian religion. The form and function of temples is thus very variable, though they are often considered by believers to be in some sense the "house" of one or more deities. Typically offerings of some sort are made to the deity, and other rituals enacted, and a special group of clergy maintain, and operate the temple. The degree to which the whole population of believers can access the building varies significantly; often parts or even the whole main building can only be accessed by the clergy. Temples typically have a main building and a larger precinct, which may contain many other buildings. The word comes from Ancient Rome, where a templum constituted a sacred precinct as defined by a priest, or augur. It has the same root as the word "template", a plan in preparation of the building that was marked out on the ground by the augur. Templa also became associated with the dwelling places of a god or gods. Despite the specific set of meanings associated with the word, it has now become widely used to describe a house of worship for any number of religions and is even used for time periods prior to the Romans.

  • Mosque

    A mosque (; from Arabic: مَـسْـجِـد‎, translit. masjid, lit. place of ritual prostration) is a place of worship for Muslims.Any act of worship that follows the Islamic rules of prayer can be said to create a mosque, whether or not it takes place in a special building. Informal and open-air places of worship are called musalla, while mosques used for communal prayer on Fridays are known as jāmiʿ. Mosque buildings typically contain an ornamental niche (mihrab) set into the wall that indicates the direction of Mecca (qiblah), ablution facilities and minarets from which calls to prayer are issued. The pulpit (minbar), from which the Friday sermon (khutba) is delivered, was in earlier times characteristic of the central city mosque, but has since become common in smaller mosques. Mosques typically have segregated spaces for men and women. This basic pattern of organization has assumed different forms depending on the region, period and denomination.Mosques commonly serve as locations for prayer, Ramadan vigils, funeral services, Sufi ceremonies, marriage and business agreements, alms collection and distribution, as well as homeless shelters. Historically, mosques were also important centers of elementary education and advanced training in religious sciences. In modern times, they have preserved their role as places of religious instruction and debate, but higher learning now generally takes place in specialized institutions. Special importance is accorded to the Great Mosque of Mecca (center of the hajj), Prophet's Mosque in Medina (burial place of Muhammad) and the Al-Aqsa Mosque in Jerusalem (believed to be the site of Muhammad's ascent to heaven). In the past, many mosques in the Muslim world were built over burial places of Sufi saints and other venerated figures, which has turned them into popular pilgrimage destinations.The first mosque was built by Muhammad in Medina. With the spread of Islam, mosques multiplied across the Islamic world. Sometimes churches and other temples were converted into mosques, which influenced Islamic architectural styles. While most pre-modern mosques were funded by charitable endowments, modern states in the Muslim world have attempted to bring mosques under government control. Increasing government regulation of large mosques has been countered by a rise of privately funded mosques of various affiliations and ideologies, many of which serve as bases for different Islamic revivalist currents and social activism. Mosques have played a number of political roles. The rates of mosque attendance vary widely depending on the region.

Wiktionary

  • Temple (noun)

    A house of worship, especially

  • Temple (noun)

    A house of worship dedicated to a polytheistic faith.

    "The temple of Zeus was very large."

  • Temple (noun)

    A Orthodox synagogue.

    "How often do you go to temple?"

  • Temple (noun)

    A meeting house of the Oddfellows fraternity; its members.

  • Temple (noun)

    Any place regarded as holding a religious presence.

  • Temple (noun)

    Anything regarded as important or minutely cared for.

    "My body is my temple."

  • Temple (noun)

    A pad to pad while the other fingers are clasped together.

  • Temple (noun)

    The slightly flatter region, on either side of the head, back of the eye and forehead, above the zygomatic arch and in front of the ear.

  • Temple (noun)

    Either of the sidepieces on a set of spectacles, extending backwards from the hinge toward the ears and, usually, turning down around them.

  • Temple (noun)

    A contrivance used in a loom for keeping the web stretched transversely.

  • Temple (verb)

    To build a temple for; to appropriate a temple to; to temple a god

  • Mosque (noun)

    A place of worship for Muslims, often having at least one minaret; a masjid.

    "There's a mosque near where I live."

    "masjid"

Oxford Dictionary

  • Temple (noun)

    a building devoted to the worship of a god or gods.

  • Temple (noun)

    either of two successive religious buildings of the Jews in Jerusalem. The first (957–586 BC) was built by Solomon and destroyed by Nebuchadnezzar; it contained the Ark of the Covenant. The second (515 BC–AD 70) was enlarged by Herod the Great from 20 BC and destroyed by the Romans during a Jewish revolt; all that remains is the Wailing Wall.

  • Temple (noun)

    a synagogue.

  • Temple (noun)

    a place of Christian public worship, especially a Protestant church in France.

  • Temple (noun)

    a thing regarded as holy or likened to a temple, especially a person's body

    "June treats her body like a temple: she takes yoga classes every day"

  • Temple (noun)

    a place devoted to or seen as the centre of a particular activity or interest

    "a temple of science"

  • Temple (noun)

    a group of buildings in Fleet Street, London, which stand on land formerly occupied by the headquarters of the Knights Templar. Located there are the Inner and Outer Temple, two of the Inns of Court.

  • Temple (noun)

    the flat part of either side of the head between the forehead and the ear

    "a man with curly hair greying at the temples"

  • Temple (noun)

    a device in a loom for keeping the cloth stretched.

  • Mosque (noun)

    a Muslim place of worship.

Webster Dictionary

  • Temple (noun)

    A contrivence used in a loom for keeping the web stretched transversely.

  • Temple (noun)

    The space, on either side of the head, back of the eye and forehead, above the zygomatic arch and in front of the ear.

  • Temple (noun)

    One of the side bars of a pair of spectacles, jointed to the bows, and passing one on either side of the head to hold the spectacles in place.

  • Temple (noun)

    A place or edifice dedicated to the worship of some deity; as, the temple of Jupiter at Athens, or of Juggernaut in India.

  • Temple (noun)

    The edifice erected at Jerusalem for the worship of Jehovah.

  • Temple (noun)

    Hence, among Christians, an edifice erected as a place of public worship; a church.

  • Temple (noun)

    Fig.: Any place in which the divine presence specially resides.

  • Temple (noun)

    A building dedicated to the administration of ordinances.

  • Temple (noun)

    A local organization of Odd Fellows.

  • Temple

    To build a temple for; to appropriate a temple to; as, to temple a god.

  • Mosque (noun)

    A Mohammedan church or place of religious worship.

Princeton's WordNet

  • Temple (noun)

    place of worship consisting of an edifice for the worship of a deity

  • Temple (noun)

    the flat area on either side of the forehead;

    "the veins in his temple throbbed"

  • Temple (noun)

    an edifice devoted to special or exalted purposes

  • Temple (noun)

    (Judaism) the place of worship for a Jewish congregation

  • Mosque (noun)

    (Islam) a Muslim place of worship

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