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Snare vs. Trap

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  • Snare (noun)

    A trap (especially one made from a loop of wire, string, or leather).

  • Snare (noun)

    A mental or psychological trap.

  • Snare (noun)

    A loop of cord used in obstetric cases, to hold or to pull a fetus from the mother animal.

  • Snare (noun)

    A similar looped instrument formerly used to remove tumours etc.

  • Snare (noun)

    A set of stiff wires held under tension against the lower skin of a drum to create a rattling sound.

  • Snare (noun)

    A snare drum.

  • Snare (verb)

    To catch or hold, especially with a loop.

  • Snare (verb)

    To ensnare.

  • Trap (noun)

    A machine or other device designed to catch (and sometimes kill) animals, either by holding them in a container, or by catching hold of part of the body.

    "I put down some traps in my apartment to try and deal with the mouse problem."

  • Trap (noun)

    A trick or arrangement designed to catch someone in a more general sense; a snare.

    "Unfortunately she fell into the trap of confusing biology with destiny."

  • Trap (noun)

    A covering over a hole or opening; a trapdoor.

    "Close the trap, would you, before someone falls and breaks their neck."

  • Trap (noun)

    A wooden instrument shaped somewhat like a shoe, used in the game of trapball

  • Trap (noun)

    The game of trapball itself.

  • Trap (noun)

    Any device used to hold and suddenly release an object.

    "They shot out of the school gates like greyhounds out of the trap."

  • Trap (noun)

    A bend, sag, or other device in a waste-pipe arranged so that the liquid contents form a seal which prevents the escape of noxious gases, but permits the flow of liquids.

  • Trap (noun)

    A place in a water pipe, pump, etc., where air accumulates for lack of an outlet.

  • Trap (noun)

    A light two-wheeled carriage with springs.

  • Trap (noun)

    A person's mouth.

    "Keep your trap shut."

  • Trap (noun)

    Belongings.

  • Trap (noun)

    A cubicle (in a public toilet).

    "I've just laid a cable in trap 2 so I'd give it 5 minutes if I were you."

  • Trap (noun)

    Trapshooting.

  • Trap (noun)

    An exception generated by the processor or by an external event.

  • Trap (noun)

    A mining license inspector during the Australian gold rush.

  • Trap (noun)

    A vehicle, residential building, or sidewalk corner where drugs are manufactured, packaged, or sold. Also used attributively to describe things which are used for the sale of drugs, e.g. "a trap phone", "a trap car".

  • Trap (noun)

    A kind of movable stepladder.

  • Trap (noun)

    A non-op trans woman or (femininely dressed) transvestite.

  • Trap (noun)

    A fictional character from anime, or related media, who is coded as or has qualities typically associated with a gender other than the character's textual gender.

  • Trap (noun)

    A fusion genre of hip-hop and electronic music.

  • Trap (noun)

    A dark coloured igneous rock, now used to designate any non-volcanic, non-granitic igneous rock; trap rock.

  • Trap (noun)

    The trapezius muscle.

  • Trap (verb)

    To physically capture, to catch in a trap or traps, or something like a trap.

    "to trap foxes"

  • Trap (verb)

    To ensnare; to take by stratagem; to entrap.

  • Trap (verb)

    To provide with a trap.

    "to trap a drain;"

    "to trap a sewer pipe"

  • Trap (verb)

    To set traps for game; to make a business of trapping game

    "trap for beaver"

  • Trap (verb)

    To leave suddenly, to flee.

  • Trap (verb)

    To sell narcotics, especially in a public area.

  • Trap (verb)

    To capture (e.g. an error) in order to handle or process it.

  • Trap (verb)

    To dress with ornaments; to adorn (especially said of horses).

Wiktionary
Oxford Dictionary
  • Snare (noun)

    A contrivance, often consisting of a noose of cord, or the like, by which a bird or other animal may be entangled and caught; a trap; a gin.

  • Snare (noun)

    Hence, anything by which one is entangled and brought into trouble.

  • Snare (noun)

    The gut or string stretched across the lower head of a drum.

  • Snare (noun)

    An instrument, consisting usually of a wireloop or noose, for removing tumors, etc., by avulsion.

  • Snare

    To catch with a snare; to insnare; to entangle; hence, to bring into unexpected evil, perplexity, or danger.

  • Trap

    To dress with ornaments; to adorn; - said especially of horses.

  • Trap

    To catch in a trap or traps; as, to trap foxes.

  • Trap

    Fig.: To insnare; to take by stratagem; to entrap.

  • Trap

    To provide with a trap; as, to trap a drain; to trap a sewer pipe. See 4th Trap, 5.

  • Trap (noun)

    An old term rather loosely used to designate various dark-colored, heavy igneous rocks, including especially the feldspathic-augitic rocks, basalt, dolerite, amygdaloid, etc., but including also some kinds of diorite. Called also trap rock.

  • Trap (noun)

    A machine or contrivance that shuts suddenly, as with a spring, used for taking game or other animals; as, a trap for foxes.

  • Trap (noun)

    Fig.: A snare; an ambush; a stratagem; any device by which one may be caught unawares.

  • Trap (noun)

    A wooden instrument shaped somewhat like a shoe, used in the game of trapball. It consists of a pivoted arm on one end of which is placed the ball to be thrown into the air by striking the other end. Also, a machine for throwing into the air glass balls, clay pigeons, etc., to be shot at.

  • Trap (noun)

    The game of trapball.

  • Trap (noun)

    A bend, sag, or partitioned chamber, in a drain, soil pipe, sewer, etc., arranged so that the liquid contents form a seal which prevents passage of air or gas, but permits the flow of liquids.

  • Trap (noun)

    A place in a water pipe, pump, etc., where air accumulates for want of an outlet.

  • Trap (noun)

    A wagon, or other vehicle.

  • Trap (noun)

    A kind of movable stepladder.

  • Trap (adjective)

    Of or pertaining to trap rock; as, a trap dike.

  • Trap (verb)

    To set traps for game; to make a business of trapping game; as, to trap for beaver.

Webster Dictionary
  • Snare (noun)

    something (often something deceptively attractive) that catches you unawares;

    "the exam was full of trap questions"

    "it was all a snare and delusion"

  • Snare (noun)

    a small drum with two heads and a snare stretched across the lower head

  • Snare (noun)

    a surgical instrument consisting of wire hoop that can be drawn tight around the base of polyps or small tumors to sever them; used especially in body cavities

  • Snare (noun)

    strings stretched across the lower head of a snare drum; they make a rattling sound when the drum is hit

  • Snare (noun)

    a trap for birds or small mammals; often has a noose

  • Snare (verb)

    catch in or as if in a trap;

    "The men trap foxes"

  • Snare (verb)

    entice and trap;

    "The car salesman had snared three potential customers"

  • Trap (noun)

    a device in which something (usually an animal) can be caught and penned

  • Trap (noun)

    drain consisting of a U-shaped section of drainpipe that holds liquid and so prevents a return flow of sewer gas

  • Trap (noun)

    something (often something deceptively attractive) that catches you unawares;

    "the exam was full of trap questions"

    "it was all a snare and delusion"

  • Trap (noun)

    a device to hurl clay pigeons into the air for trapshooters

  • Trap (noun)

    the act of concealing yourself and lying in wait to attack by surprise

  • Trap (noun)

    informal terms for the mouth

  • Trap (noun)

    a light two-wheeled carriage

  • Trap (noun)

    a hazard on a golf course

  • Trap (verb)

    place in a confining or embarrassing position;

    "He was trapped in a difficult situation"

  • Trap (verb)

    catch in or as if in a trap;

    "The men trap foxes"

  • Trap (verb)

    hold or catch as if in a trap;

    "The gaps between the teeth trap food particles"

  • Trap (verb)

    to hold fast or prevent from moving;

    "The child was pinned under the fallen tree"

Princeton's WordNet

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