Amyloglucosidase vs. Amylase - What's the difference?

Wikipedia

  • Amylase

    Amylase () is an enzyme that catalyses the hydrolysis of starch (Latin amylum) into sugars. Amylase is present in the saliva of humans and some other mammals, where it begins the chemical process of digestion. Foods that contain large amounts of starch but little sugar, such as rice and potatoes, may acquire a slightly sweet taste as they are chewed because amylase degrades some of their starch into sugar. The pancreas and salivary gland make amylase (alpha amylase) to hydrolyse dietary starch into disaccharides and trisaccharides which are converted by other enzymes to glucose to supply the body with energy. Plants and some bacteria also produce amylase. As diastase, amylase was the first enzyme to be discovered and isolated (by Anselme Payen in 1833). Specific amylase proteins are designated by different Greek letters. All amylases are glycoside hydrolases and act on α-1,4-glycosidic bonds.

Wiktionary

  • Amyloglucosidase (noun)

    A form of amylase used industrially to produce sugars from starches

  • Amylase (noun)

    Any of a class of digestive enzymes, present in saliva, that break down complex carbohydrates such as starch into simpler sugars such as glucose.

    "egg yolk amylase"

Princeton's WordNet

  • Amylase (noun)

    any of a group of proteins found in saliva and pancreatic juice and parts of plants; help convert starch to sugar

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