VS.

Sew vs. Stitch

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Sewverb

(transitive) To use a needle to pass thread repeatedly through (pieces of fabric) in order to join them together.

‘Balls were first made of grass or leaves held together by strings, and later of pieces of animal skin sewn together and stuffed with feathers or hay.’;

Stitchnoun

A single pass of a needle in sewing; the loop or turn of the thread thus made.

Sewverb

(intransitive) To use a needle to pass thread repeatedly through pieces of fabric in order to join them together.

Stitchnoun

An arrangement of stitches in sewing, or method of stitching in some particular way or style.

‘cross stitch’; ‘herringbone stitch’;

Sewverb

(transitive) To enclose by sewing.

‘to sew money into a bag’;

Stitchnoun

An intense stabbing pain under the lower edge of the ribcage, brought on by exercise.

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Sewverb

To drain the water from.

Stitchnoun

A single turn of the thread round a needle in knitting; a link, or loop, of yarn

‘drop a stitch’; ‘take up a stitch’;

Sewverb

(nautical) Of a ship, to be grounded.

Stitchnoun

An arrangement of stitches in knitting, or method of knitting in some particular way or style.

Sewnoun

Juice; gravy; a seasoned dish; a delicacy.

‘I will not tell of their strange sewes.’;

Stitchnoun

A space of work taken up, or gone over, in a single pass of the needle.

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Sewverb

To follow; to pursue; to sue.

Stitchnoun

(by extension) Any space passed over; distance.

Sewverb

To unite or fasten together by stitches, as with a needle and thread.

‘No man also seweth a piece of new cloth on an old garment.’;

Stitchnoun

A local sharp pain; an acute pain, like the piercing of a needle.

‘a stitch in the side’;

Sewverb

To close or stop by ssewing; - often with up; as, to sew up a rip.

Stitchnoun

(obsolete) A contortion, or twist.

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Sewverb

To inclose by sewing; - sometimes with up; as, to sew money in a bag.

Stitchnoun

(colloquial) Any least part of a fabric or dress.

‘to wet every stitch of clothes’; ‘She didn't have a stitch on.’;

Sewverb

To practice sewing; to work with needle and thread.

Stitchnoun

A furrow.

Sewverb

To drain, as a pond, for taking the fish.

Stitchverb

To form stitches in; especially, to sew in such a manner as to show on the surface a continuous line of stitches.

‘to stitch a shirt bosom.’;

Sewverb

fasten by sewing; do needlework

Stitchverb

To sew, or unite or attach by stitches.

‘to stitch printed sheets in making a book or a pamphlet.’;

Sewverb

create (clothes) with cloth;

‘Can the seamstress sew me a suit by next week?’;

Stitchverb

(intransitive) To practice/practise stitching or needlework.

Sewverb

join, fasten, or repair (something) by making stitches with a needle and thread or a sewing machine

‘she sewed the seams and hemmed the border’; ‘I don't even sew very well’;

Stitchverb

(agriculture) To form land into ridges.

Sewverb

attach (something) to something else by sewing

‘she could sew the veil on properly in the morning’;

Stitchverb

To weld together through a series of connecting or overlapping spot welds.

Sewverb

make (a garment) by sewing

‘the two sisters sewed their own dresses’;

Stitchverb

To combine two or more photographs of the same scene into a single image.

‘I can use this software to stitch together a panorama.’;

Stitchverb

(more generally) To include, combine, or unite into a single whole.

Stitchnoun

A single pass of a needle in sewing; the loop or turn of the thread thus made.

Stitchnoun

A single turn of the thread round a needle in knitting; a link, or loop, of yarn; as, to let down, or drop, a stitch; to take up a stitch.

Stitchnoun

A space of work taken up, or gone over, in a single pass of the needle; hence, by extension, any space passed over; distance.

‘You have gone a good stitch.’; ‘In Syria the husbandmen go lightly over with their plow, and take no deep stitch in making their furrows.’;

Stitchnoun

A local sharp pain; an acute pain, like the piercing of a needle; as, a stitch in the side.

‘He was taken with a cold and with stitches, which was, indeed, a pleurisy.’;

Stitchnoun

A contortion, or twist.

‘If you talk,Or pull your face into a stitch again,I shall be angry.’;

Stitchnoun

Any least part of a fabric or dress; as, to wet every stitch of clothes.

Stitchnoun

A furrow.

Stitchnoun

An arrangement of stitches, or method of stitching in some particular way or style; as, cross-stitch; herringbone stitch, etc.

Stitchverb

To form stitches in; especially, to sew in such a manner as to show on the surface a continuous line of stitches; as, to stitch a shirt bosom.

Stitchverb

To sew, or unite together by stitches; as, to stitch printed sheets in making a book or a pamphlet.

Stitchverb

To form land into ridges.

Stitchverb

To practice stitching, or needlework.

Stitchnoun

sewing consisting of a link or loop or knot made by drawing a threaded needle through a fabric

Stitchnoun

a sharp spasm of pain in the side resulting from running

Stitchverb

fasten by sewing; do needlework

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