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Momentum vs. Inertia

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Momentumnoun

(physics) (of a body in motion) The tendency of a body to maintain its inertial motion; the product of its mass and velocity.

Inertianoun

The property of a body that resists any change to its uniform motion; equivalent to its mass.

Momentumnoun

The impetus, either of a body in motion, or of an idea or course of events. (i.e: a moment)

Inertianoun

(figuratively) In a person, unwillingness to take action.

Momentumnoun

The quantity of motion in a moving body, being always proportioned to the quantity of matter multiplied by the velocity; impetus.

Inertianoun

(medicine) Lack of activity; sluggishness; said especially of the uterus, when, in labour, its contractions have nearly or wholly ceased.

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Momentumnoun

Essential element, or constituent element.

‘I shall state the several momenta of the distinction in separate propositions.’;

Inertianoun

That property of matter by which it tends when at rest to remain so, and when in motion to continue in motion, and in the same straight line or direction, unless acted on by some external force; - sometimes called vis inertiæ. The inertia of a body is proportional to its mass.

Momentumnoun

A property of an activity or course of events, viewed as analogous to forward motion or to physical momentum (def. 1), such that the activity is believed to be able to continue moving forward without further application of force or effort; - often used to describe an increase in the acquisition of public support for a purpose; as, as, the petition drive gained momentum when it was mentioned in the newspapers.

Inertianoun

Inertness; indisposition to motion, exertion, or action; lack of energy; sluggishness.

‘Men . . . have immense irresolution and inertia.’;

Momentumnoun

an impelling force or strength;

‘the car's momentum carried it off the road’;

Inertianoun

Lack of activity; sluggishness; - said especially of the uterus, when, in labor, its contractions have nearly or wholly ceased.

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Momentumnoun

the product of a body's mass and its velocity;

‘the momentum of the particles was deduced from meteoritic velocities’;

Inertianoun

a disposition to remain inactive or inert;

‘he had to overcome his inertia and get back to work’;

Momentum

In Newtonian mechanics, linear momentum, translational momentum, or simply momentum (pl. momenta) is the product of the mass and velocity of an object.

Inertianoun

(physics) the tendency of a body to maintain is state of rest or uniform motion unless acted upon by an external force

Inertianoun

a tendency to do nothing or to remain unchanged

‘the bureaucratic inertia of the various tiers of government’;

Inertianoun

a property of matter by which it continues in its existing state of rest or uniform motion in a straight line, unless that state is changed by an external force

‘the power required to overcome friction and the inertia of the moving parts’;

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Inertianoun

resistance to change in some other physical property

‘the thermal inertia of the oceans will delay the full rise in temperature for a few decades’;

Inertia

Inertia is the resistance of any physical object to any change in its velocity. This includes changes to the object's speed, or direction of motion.

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