VS.

Lord vs. Sir

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Main Difference

The main difference between Lord and Sir is that the Lord is a title of nobility for proprietary power and control of a territory given by a King or religious authorities and Sir is a honorific title

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Wikipedia
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  • Lord (noun)

    The master of the servants of a household; the master of a feudal manor

  • Lord (noun)

    The male head of a household, a father or husband.

  • Lord (noun)

    One possessing similar mastery over others; any feudal superior generally; any nobleman or aristocrat; any chief, prince, or sovereign ruler; in Scotland, a male member of the lowest rank of nobility (the equivalent rank in England is baron)

  • Lord (noun)

    The owner of a house, piece of land, or other possession

  • Lord (noun)

    A feudal tenant holding his manor directly of the king

  • Lord (noun)

    A peer of the realm, particularly a temporal one

  • Lord (noun)

    One possessing similar mastery in figurative senses (esp. as lord of ~)

  • Lord (noun)

    A baron or lesser nobleman, as opposed to greater ones

  • Lord (noun)

    The heavenly body considered to possess a dominant influence over an event, time, etc.

  • Lord (noun)

    A hunchback.

  • Lord (noun)

    Sixpence.

  • Lord (verb)

    Domineer or act like a lord.

  • Lord (verb)

    To invest with the dignity, power, and privileges of a lord; to grant the title of lord.

  • Sir (noun)

    A man of a higher rank or position.

  • Sir (noun)

    A respectful term of address to a man of higher rank or position, particularly:

  • Sir (noun)

    to a knight or other low member of the peerage.

    "Just be careful. He gets whingy now if you don't address him as Sir John."

  • Sir (noun)

    to a superior military officer.

    "Sir, yes sir."

  • Sir (noun)

    A respectful term of address to any male, especially if his name or proper title is unknown.

    "Excuse me, sir, do you know the way to the art museum?"

  • Sir (noun)

    Used as an intensifier after yes or no.

    "Sir, yes sir."

  • Sir (verb)

    To address (someone) using "sir".

    "Sir, yes, sir!
    Don't you sir me, private! I work for a living!"

Wiktionary
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  • Lord (noun)

    A hump-backed person; - so called sportively.

  • Lord (noun)

    One who has power and authority; a master; a ruler; a governor; a prince; a proprietor, as of a manor.

  • Lord (noun)

    A titled nobleman., whether a peer of the realm or not; a bishop, as a member of the House of Lords; by courtesy; the son of a duke or marquis, or the eldest son of an earl; in a restricted sense, a baron, as opposed to noblemen of higher rank.

  • Lord (noun)

    A title bestowed on the persons above named; and also, for honor, on certain official persons; as, lord advocate, lord chamberlain, lord chancellor, lord chief justice, etc.

  • Lord (noun)

    A husband.

  • Lord (noun)

    One of whom a fee or estate is held; the male owner of feudal land; as, the lord of the soil; the lord of the manor.

  • Lord (noun)

    The Supreme Being; Jehovah.

  • Lord (noun)

    The Savior; Jesus Christ.

  • Lord

    To invest with the dignity, power, and privileges of a lord.

  • Lord

    To rule or preside over as a lord.

  • Lord (verb)

    To play the lord; to domineer; to rule with arbitrary or despotic sway; - sometimes with over; and sometimes with it in the manner of a transitive verb; as, rich students lording it over their classmates.

  • Sir (noun)

    A man of social authority and dignity; a lord; a master; a gentleman; - in this sense usually spelled sire.

  • Sir (noun)

    A title prefixed to the Christian name of a knight or a baronet.

  • Sir (noun)

    An English rendering of the LAtin Dominus, the academical title of a bachelor of arts; - formerly colloquially, and sometimes contemptuously, applied to the clergy.

  • Sir (noun)

    A respectful title, used in addressing a man, without being prefixed to his name; - used especially in speaking to elders or superiors; sometimes, also, used in the way of emphatic formality.

Webster Dictionary
  • Lord (noun)

    terms referring to the Judeo-Christian God

  • Lord (noun)

    a person who has general authority over others

  • Lord (noun)

    a titled peer of the realm

  • Lord (verb)

    make a lord of someone

  • Sir (noun)

    term of address for a man

  • Sir (noun)

    a title used before the name of knight or baronet

Princeton's WordNet

Lord Illustrations

Sir Illustrations

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