VS.

Hypothec vs. Mortgage

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Hypothecnoun

(legal) In Scotland, a landlord's right over the stocking (cattle, implements, etc.), and crops of his tenant, as security for payment of rent.

Mortgagenoun

(legal) A special form of secured loan where the purpose of the loan must be specified to the lender, to purchase assets that must be fixed (not movable) property, such as a house or piece of farm land. The assets are registered as the legal property of the borrower but the lender can seize them and dispose of them if they are not satisfied with the manner in which the repayment of the loan is conducted by the borrower. Once the loan is fully repaid, the lender loses this right of seizure and the assets are then deemed to be unencumbered.

‘We're renting a property in the city centre because we can't afford to get a mortgage yet.’;

Hypothecnoun

(legal) In Québec, a legal right over property used as security for an obligation, such as a mortgage.

Mortgagenoun

(obsolete) State of being pledged.

‘lands given in mortgage’;

Hypothecnoun

(colloquial) Everything; the whole lot.

‘...saddle and all, the whole hypothec turned round and grovelled in the dust below the donkey’s belly.’;

Mortgageverb

To borrow against a property, to obtain a loan for another purpose by giving away the right of seizure to the lender over a fixed property such as a house or piece of land; to pledge a property in order to get a loan.

‘to mortgage a property, an estate, a shop’; ‘We mortgaged our house in order to start a company.’;

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Hypothecnoun

A landlord's right, independently of stipulation, over the stocking (cattle, implements, etc.), and crops of his tenant, as security for payment of rent.

Mortgageverb

To pledge and make liable; to make subject to obligation; to achieve an immediate result by paying for it in the long term.

Hypothec

Hypothec (; German: Hypothek, French: hypothèque, Polish: hipoteka, from Lat. hypotheca, from Gk.

Mortgagenoun

A conveyance of property, upon condition, as security for the payment of a debt or the preformance of a duty, and to become void upon payment or performance according to the stipulated terms; also, the written instrument by which the conveyance is made.

Mortgagenoun

State of being pledged; as, lands given in mortgage.

Mortgageverb

To grant or convey, as property, for the security of a debt, or other engagement, upon a condition that if the debt or engagement shall be discharged according to the contract, the conveyance shall be void, otherwise to become absolute, subject, however, to the right of redemption.

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Mortgageverb

Hence: To pledge, either literally or figuratively; to make subject to a claim or obligation.

‘Mortgaging their lives to covetise.’; ‘I myself an mortgaged to thy will.’;

Mortgagenoun

a conditional conveyance of property as security for the repayment of a loan

Mortgageverb

put up as security or collateral

Mortgagenoun

a legal agreement by which a bank, building society, etc. lends money at interest in exchange for taking title of the debtor's property, with the condition that the conveyance of title becomes void upon the payment of the debt

‘I put down a hundred thousand in cash and took out a mortgage for the rest’;

Mortgagenoun

the amount of money borrowed in a mortgage

‘a £60,000 mortgage’;

Mortgagenoun

a deed effecting a mortgage.

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Mortgageverb

convey (a property) to a creditor as security on a loan

‘the estate was mortgaged up to the hilt’; ‘a heavily mortgaged farm’;

Mortgageverb

expose to future risk or constraint for the sake of immediate advantage

‘some people worry that selling off state assets mortgages the country's future’;

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