VS.

Force vs. Weight

Published:

Forcenoun

Strength or energy of body or mind; active power; vigour; might; capacity of exercising an influence or producing an effect.

‘the force of an appeal, an argument, or a contract’;

Weightnoun

The force on an object due to the gravitational attraction between it and the Earth (or whatever astronomical object it is primarily influenced by).

Forcenoun

Power exerted against will or consent; compulsory power; violence; coercion.

Weightnoun

An object used to make something heavier.

Forcenoun

(countable) Anything that is able to make a big change in a person or thing.

Weightnoun

A standardized block of metal used in a balance to measure the mass of another object.

ADVERTISEMENT

Forcenoun

A physical quantity that denotes ability to push, pull, twist or accelerate a body and which has a direction and is measured in a unit dimensioned in mass × distance/time² (ML/T²): SI: newton (N); CGS: dyne (dyn)

Weightnoun

Importance or influence.

Forcenoun

Something or anything that has the power to produce a physical effect upon something else, such as causing it to move or change shape.

Weightnoun

(weightlifting) A disc of iron, dumbbell, or barbell used for training the muscles.

‘He's working out with weights.’;

Forcenoun

(countable) A group that aims to attack, control, or constrain.

‘police force’;

Weightnoun

(physics) Mass (net weight, atomic weight, molecular weight, troy weight, carat weight, etc.).

ADVERTISEMENT

Forcenoun

(uncountable) The ability to attack, control, or constrain.

‘show of force’;

Weightnoun

(statistics) A variable which multiplies a value for ease of statistical manipulation.

Forcenoun

(countable) A magic trick in which the outcome is known to the magician beforehand, especially one involving the apparent free choice of a card by another person.

Weightnoun

(topology) The smallest cardinality of a base.

Forcenoun

(legal) Legal validity.

‘The law will come into force in January.’;

Weightnoun

(typography) The boldness of a font; the relative thickness of its strokes.

ADVERTISEMENT

Forcenoun

(legal) Either unlawful violence, as in a "forced entry", or lawful compulsion.

Weightnoun

(visual art) The relative thickness of a drawn rule or painted brushstroke, line weight.

Forcenoun

Ability of an utterance or its element (word, form, prosody, ...) to effect a given meaning.

Weightnoun

(visual art) The illusion of mass.

Forcenoun

(science fiction) A binding, metaphysical, and ubiquitous power in the fictional Star Wars universe created by George Lucas.

Weightnoun

(visual art) The thickness and opacity of paint.

Forcenoun

A waterfall or cascade.

Weightnoun

Pressure; burden.

‘the weight of care or business’;

Forceverb

(transitive) To violate (a woman); to rape.

Weightnoun

The resistance against which a machine acts, as opposed to the power which moves it.

Forceverb

To exert oneself, to do one's utmost.

Weightnoun

Shipments of (often illegal) drugs.

‘He was pushing weight.’;

Forceverb

(transitive) To compel (someone or something) to do something.

Weightverb

(transitive) To add weight to something; to make something heavier.

Forceverb

(transitive) To constrain by force; to overcome the limitations or resistance of.

Weightverb

To load (fabrics) with barite, etc. to increase the weight.

Forceverb

(transitive) To drive (something) by force, to propel (generally + prepositional phrase or adverb).

Weightverb

(transitive) To load, burden or oppress someone.

Forceverb

(transitive) To cause to occur (despite inertia, resistance etc.); to produce through force.

‘The comedian's jokes weren't funny, but I forced a laugh now and then.’;

Weightverb

To assign weights to individual statistics.

Forceverb

(transitive) To forcibly open (a door, lock etc.).

‘To force a lock.’;

Weightverb

(transitive) To bias something; to slant.

Forceverb

To obtain or win by strength; to take by violence or struggle; specifically, to capture by assault; to storm, as a fortress.

Weightverb

To handicap a horse with a specified weight.

Forceverb

To create an out by touching a base in advance of a runner who has no base to return to while in possession of a ball which has already touched the ground.

‘Jones forced the runner at second by stepping on the bag.’;

Weightverb

To give a certain amount of force to a throw, kick, hit, etc.

Forceverb

(whist) To compel (an adversary or partner) to trump a trick by leading a suit that he/she does not hold.

Weightnoun

The quality of being heavy; that property of bodies by which they tend toward the center of the earth; the effect of gravitative force, especially when expressed in certain units or standards, as pounds, grams, etc.

Forceverb

(archaic) To put in force; to cause to be executed; to make binding; to enforce.

Weightnoun

The quantity of heaviness; comparative tendency to the center of the earth; the quantity of matter as estimated by the balance, or expressed numerically with reference to some standard unit; as, a mass of stone having the weight of five hundred pounds.

‘For sorrow, like a heavy-hanging bell,Once set on ringing, with his own weight goes.’;

Forceverb

(archaic) To provide with forces; to reinforce; to strengthen by soldiers; to man; to garrison.

Weightnoun

Hence, pressure; burden; as, the weight of care or business.

‘For the public all this weight he bears.’; ‘[He] who singly bore the world's sad weight.’;

Forceverb

(obsolete) To allow the force of; to value; to care for.

Weightnoun

Importance; power; influence; efficacy; consequence; moment; impressiveness; as, a consideration of vast weight.

‘In such a point of weight, so near mine honor.’;

Forceverb

To stuff; to lard; to farce.

Weightnoun

A scale, or graduated standard, of heaviness; a mode of estimating weight; as, avoirdupois weight; troy weight; apothecaries' weight.

Forceverb

To stuff; to lard; to farce.

‘Wit larded with malice, and malice forced with wit.’;

Weightnoun

A ponderous mass; something heavy; as, a clock weight; a paper weight.

‘A man leapeth better with weights in his hands.’;

Forceverb

To constrain to do or to forbear, by the exertion of a power not resistible; to compel by physical, moral, or intellectual means; to coerce; as, masters force slaves to labor.

Weightnoun

A definite mass of iron, lead, brass, or other metal, to be used for ascertaining the weight of other bodies; as, an ounce weight.

Forceverb

To compel, as by strength of evidence; as, to force conviction on the mind.

Weightnoun

The resistance against which a machine acts, as opposed to the power which moves it.

Forceverb

To do violence to; to overpower, or to compel by violence to one's will; especially, to ravish; to violate; to commit rape upon.

‘To force their monarch and insult the court.’; ‘I should have forced thee soon wish other arms.’; ‘To force a spotless virgin's chastity.’;

Weightverb

To load with a weight or weights; to load down; to make heavy; to attach weights to; as, to weight a horse or a jockey at a race; to weight a whip handle.

‘The arrows of satire, . . . weighted with sense.’;

Forceverb

To obtain, overcome, or win by strength; to take by violence or struggle; specifically, to capture by assault; to storm, as a fortress; as, to force the castle; to force a lock.

Weightverb

To assign a weight to; to express by a number the probable accuracy of, as an observation. See Weight of observations, under Weight.

Forceverb

To impel, drive, wrest, extort, get, etc., by main strength or violence; - with a following adverb, as along, away, from, into, through, out, etc.

‘It stuck so fast, so deeply buried layThat scarce the victor forced the steel away.’; ‘To force the tyrant from his seat by war.’; ‘Ethelbert ordered that none should be forced into religion.’;

Weightverb

To load (fabrics) as with barite, to increase the weight, etc.

Forceverb

To put in force; to cause to be executed; to make binding; to enforce.

‘What can the church force more?’;

Weightverb

to assign a numerical value expressing relative importance to (a measurement), to be multiplied by the value of the measurement in determining averages or other aggregate quantities; as, they weighted part one of the test twice as heavily as part 2.

Forceverb

To exert to the utmost; to urge; hence, to strain; to urge to excessive, unnatural, or untimely action; to produce by unnatural effort; as, to force a conceit or metaphor; to force a laugh; to force fruits.

‘High on a mounting wave my head I bore,Forcing my strength, and gathering to the shore.’;

Weightnoun

the vertical force exerted by a mass as a result of gravity

Forceverb

To compel (an adversary or partner) to trump a trick by leading a suit of which he has none.

Weightnoun

sports equipment used in calisthenic exercises and weightlifting; a weight that is not attached to anything and is raised and lowered by use of the hands and arms

Forceverb

To provide with forces; to reënforce; to strengthen by soldiers; to man; to garrison.

Weightnoun

the relative importance granted to something;

‘his opinion carries great weight’;

Forceverb

To allow the force of; to value; to care for.

‘For me, I force not argument a straw.’;

Weightnoun

an artifact that is heavy

Forceverb

To use violence; to make violent effort; to strive; to endeavor.

‘Forcing with gifts to win his wanton heart.’;

Weightnoun

an oppressive feeling of heavy force;

‘bowed down by the weight of responsibility’;

Forceverb

To make a difficult matter of anything; to labor; to hesitate; hence, to force of, to make much account of; to regard.

‘Your oath once broke, you force not to forswear.’; ‘I force not of such fooleries.’;

Weightnoun

a system of units used to express the weight of something

Forceverb

To be of force, importance, or weight; to matter.

‘It is not sufficient to have attained the name and dignity of a shepherd, not forcing how.’;

Weightnoun

a unit used to measure weight;

‘he placed two weights in the scale pan’;

Forcenoun

A waterfall; a cascade.

‘To see the falls for force of the river Kent.’;

Weightnoun

(statistics) a coefficient assigned to elements of a frequency distribution in order to represent their relative importance

Forcenoun

Capacity of exercising an influence or producing an effect; strength or energy of body or mind; active power; vigor; might; often, an unusual degree of strength or energy; especially, power to persuade, or convince, or impose obligation; pertinency; validity; special signification; as, the force of an appeal, an argument, a contract, or a term.

‘He was, in the full force of the words, a good man.’;

Weightverb

weight down with a load

Forcenoun

Power exerted against will or consent; compulsory power; violence; coercion; as, by force of arms; to take by force.

‘Which now they hold by force, and not by right.’;

Weightverb

present with a bias;

‘He biased his presentation so as to please the share holders’;

Forcenoun

Strength or power for war; hence, a body of land or naval combatants, with their appurtenances, ready for action; - an armament; troops; warlike array; - often in the plural; hence, a body of men prepared for action in other ways; as, the laboring force of a plantation; the armed forces.

‘Is Lucius general of the forces?’;

Weight

In science and engineering, the weight of an object is the force acting on the object due to gravity.Some standard textbooks define weight as a vector quantity, the gravitational force acting on the object. Others define weight as a scalar quantity, the magnitude of the gravitational force.

Forcenoun

Strength or power exercised without law, or contrary to law, upon persons or things; violence.

Forcenoun

Any action between two bodies which changes, or tends to change, their relative condition as to rest or motion; or, more generally, which changes, or tends to change, any physical relation between them, whether mechanical, thermal, chemical, electrical, magnetic, or of any other kind; as, the force of gravity; cohesive force; centrifugal force.

‘Thy tears are of no force to mollifyThis flinty man.’; ‘More huge in strength than wise in works he was.’; ‘Adam and first matron EveHad ended now their orisons, and foundStrength added from above, new hope to springOut of despair.’;

Forcenoun

a unit that is part of some military service;

‘he sent Caesar a force of six thousand men’;

Forcenoun

one possessing or exercising power or influence or authority;

‘the mysterious presence of an evil power’; ‘may the force be with you’; ‘the forces of evil’;

Forcenoun

(physics) the influence that produces a change in a physical quantity;

‘force equals mass times acceleration’;

Forcenoun

group of people willing to obey orders;

‘a public force is necessary to give security to the rights of citizens’;

Forcenoun

a powerful effect or influence;

‘the force of his eloquence easily persuaded them’;

Forcenoun

an act of aggression (as one against a person who resists);

‘he may accomplish by craft in the long run what he cannot do by force and violence in the short one’;

Forcenoun

physical energy or intensity;

‘he hit with all the force he could muster’; ‘it was destroyed by the strength of the gale’; ‘a government has not the vitality and forcefulness of a living man’;

Forcenoun

a group of people having the power of effective action;

‘he joined forces with a band of adventurers’;

Forcenoun

(of a law) having legal validity;

‘the law is still in effect’;

Forceverb

to cause to do through pressure or necessity, by physical, moral or intellectual means :

‘She forced him to take a job in the city’; ‘He squeezed her for information’;

Forceverb

urge or force (a person) to an action; constrain or motivate

Forceverb

move with force,

‘He pushed the table into a corner’;

Forceverb

impose or thrust urgently, importunately, or inexorably;

‘She forced her diet fads on him’;

Forceverb

squeeze like a wedge into a tight space;

‘I squeezed myself into the corner’;

Forceverb

force into or from an action or state, either physically or metaphorically;

‘She rammed her mind into focus’; ‘He drives me mad’;

Forceverb

do forcibly; exert force;

‘Don't force it!’;

Forceverb

cause to move along the ground by pulling;

‘draw a wagon’; ‘pull a sled’;

Forceverb

take by force;

‘Storm the fort’;

Forcenoun

strength or energy as an attribute of physical action or movement

‘he was thrown backwards by the force of the explosion’;

Forcenoun

an influence tending to change the motion of a body or produce motion or stress in a stationary body. The magnitude of such an influence is often calculated by multiplying the mass of the body and its acceleration.

Forcenoun

used with a number as a measure of wind strength on the Beaufort scale

‘a force-nine gale’;

Forcenoun

coercion or compulsion, especially with the use or threat of violence

‘they ruled by law and not by force’;

Forcenoun

mental or moral strength or power

‘the force of popular opinion’;

Forcenoun

a person or thing regarded as exerting power or influence

‘he might still be a force for peace and unity’;

Forcenoun

the powerful effect of something

‘the Committee accepted the force of this argument’;

Forcenoun

an organized body of military personnel or police

‘a British peacekeeping force’;

Forcenoun

troops and weaponry

‘a battle between the forces of good and evil’; ‘left-wing guerrilla forces’;

Forcenoun

the army, navy, and air force of a country.

Forcenoun

the police.

Forcenoun

a group of people brought together and organized for a particular activity

‘a sales force’;

Forcenoun

a waterfall.

Forceverb

make a way through or into by physical strength; break open by force

‘the back door of the bank was forced’;

Forceverb

drive or push into a specified position or state using physical strength or against resistance

‘thieves tried to force open the cash register’; ‘Mark forced her arms back above her head’;

Forceverb

achieve or bring about (something) by effort

‘Sabine forced a smile’; ‘they forced a way through the crowd’;

Forceverb

artificially hasten the development or maturity of (a plant).

Forceverb

make (someone) do something against their will

‘the universities were forced to cut staff’; ‘she was forced into early retirement’;

Forceverb

put out (a runner) by necessitating an advance to the next base when it is not possible to do so safely.

Force

In physics, a force is any influence that, when unopposed, will change the motion of an object. A force can cause an object with mass to change its velocity (which includes to begin moving from a state of rest), i.e., to accelerate.

Force Illustrations

Weight Illustrations

Popular Comparisons

Latest Comparisons

Trending Comparisons