VS.

Essence vs. Extract

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Essencenoun

The inherent nature of a thing or idea.

Extractnoun

Something that is extracted or drawn out.

Essencenoun

(philosophy) The true nature of anything, not accidental or illusory.

Extractnoun

A portion of a book or document, incorporated distinctly in another work; a citation; a quotation.

‘I used an extract of Hemingway's book to demonstrate culture shock.’;

Essencenoun

Constituent substance.

Extractnoun

A decoction, solution, or infusion made by drawing out from any substance that which gives it its essential and characteristic virtue

‘extract of beef’; ‘extract of dandelion’;

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Essencenoun

A being; especially, a purely spiritual being.

Extractnoun

Any substance extracted is such a way, and characteristic of that from which it is obtained

‘quinine is the most important extract of Peruvian bark.’;

Essencenoun

A significant feature of something.

Extractnoun

A solid preparation obtained by evaporating a solution of a drug, etc., or the fresh juice of a plant (distinguished from an abstract).

Essencenoun

The concentrated form of a plant or drug obtained through a distillation process.

‘essence of Jojoba’;

Extractnoun

(obsolete) A peculiar principle (fundamental essence) once erroneously supposed to form the basis of all vegetable extracts.

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Essencenoun

An extract or concentrate obtained from a plant or other matter used for flavouring.

‘vanilla essence’;

Extractnoun

Ancestry; descent.

Essencenoun

Fragrance, a perfume.

Extractnoun

A draft or copy of writing; a certified copy of the proceedings in an action and the judgment therein, with an order for execution.

Essencenoun

The constituent elementary notions which constitute a complex notion, and must be enumerated to define it; sometimes called the nominal essence.

Extractverb

(transitive) To draw out; to pull out; to remove forcibly from a fixed position, as by traction or suction, etc.

‘to extract a tooth from its socket, a stump from the earth, or a splinter from the finger’;

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Essencenoun

The constituent quality or qualities which belong to any object, or class of objects, or on which they depend for being what they are (distinguished as real essence); the real being, divested of all logical accidents; that quality which constitutes or marks the true nature of anything; distinctive character; hence, virtue or quality of a thing, separated from its grosser parts.

‘The laws are at present, both in form and essence, the greatest curse that society labors under.’; ‘Gifts and alms are the expressions, not the essence of this virtue [charity].’; ‘The essence of Addison's humor is irony.’;

Extractverb

(transitive) To withdraw by expression, distillation, or other mechanical or chemical process. Compare abstract (transitive verb).

‘to extract an essential oil from a plant’;

Essencenoun

Constituent substance.

‘And uncompounded is their essence pure.’;

Extractverb

(transitive) To take by selection; to choose out; to cite or quote, as a passage from a book.

Essencenoun

A being; esp., a purely spiritual being.

‘As far as gods and heavenly essencesCan perish.’; ‘He had been indulging in fanciful speculations on spiritual essences, until . . . he had and ideal world of his own around him.’;

Extractverb

(transitive) To select parts of a whole

‘We need to try to extract the positives from the defeat.’;

Essencenoun

The predominant qualities or virtues of a plant or drug, extracted and refined from grosser matter; or, more strictly, the solution in spirits of wine of a volatile or essential oil; as, the essence of mint, and the like.

‘The . . . word essence . . . scarcely underwent a more complete transformation when from being the abstract of the verb "to be," it came to denote something sufficiently concrete to be inclosed in a glass bottle.’;

Extractverb

To determine (a root of a number).

‘Please extract the cube root of 27.’;

Essencenoun

Perfume; odor; scent; or the volatile matter constituting perfume.

‘Nor let the essences exhale.’;

Extractverb

To draw out or forth; to pull out; to remove forcibly from a fixed position, as by traction or suction, etc.; as, to extract a tooth from its socket, a stump from the earth, a splinter from the finger.

‘The beeSits on the bloom extracting liquid sweet.’;

Essenceverb

To perfume; to scent.

Extractverb

To withdraw by expression, distillation, or other mechanical or chemical process; as, to extract an essence. Cf. Abstract, v. t., 6.

‘Sunbeams may be extracted from cucumbers, but the process is tedious.’;

Essencenoun

the choicest or most essential or most vital part of some idea or experience;

‘the gist of the prosecutor's argument’; ‘the heart and soul of the Republican Party’; ‘the nub of the story’;

Extractverb

To take by selection; to choose out; to cite or quote, as a passage from a book.

‘I have extracted out of that pamphlet a few notorious falsehoods.’;

Essencenoun

any substance possessing to a high degree the predominant properties of a plant or drug or other natural product from which it is extracted

Extractnoun

That which is extracted or drawn out.

Essencenoun

the central meaning or theme of a speech or literary work

Extractnoun

A portion of a book or document, separately transcribed; a citation; a quotation.

Essencenoun

a toiletry that emits and diffuses a fragrant odor

Extractnoun

A decoction, solution, or infusion made by dissolving out from any substance that which gives it its essential and characteristic virtue; essence; as, extract of beef; extract of dandelion; also, any substance so extracted, and characteristic of that from which it is obtained; as, quinine is the most important extract of Peruvian bark.

Essencenoun

the intrinsic nature or indispensable quality of something, especially something abstract, which determines its character

‘conflict is the essence of drama’;

Extractnoun

A solid preparation obtained by evaporating a solution of a drug, etc., or the fresh juice of a plant; - distinguished from an abstract. See Abstract, n., 4.

Essencenoun

a property or group of properties of something without which it would not exist or be what it is

‘Locke's scepticism about our ability to penetrate to the real essences of things’;

Extractnoun

A peculiar principle once erroneously supposed to form the basis of all vegetable extracts; - called also the extractive principle.

Essencenoun

an extract or concentrate obtained from a plant or other matter and used for flavouring or scent

‘vanilla essence’;

Extractnoun

Extraction; descent.

Essence

Essence (Latin: essentia) is a polysemic term, used in philosophy and theology as a designation for the property or set of properties that make an entity or substance what it fundamentally is, and which it has by necessity, and without which it loses its identity. Essence is contrasted with accident: a property that the entity or substance has contingently, without which the substance can still retain its identity.

Extractnoun

A draught or copy of writing; certified copy of the proceedings in an action and the judgement therein, with an order for execution.

Extractnoun

a solution obtained by steeping or soaking a substance (usually in water)

Extractnoun

a passage selected from a larger work;

‘he presented excerpts from William James' philosophical writings’;

Extractverb

draw or pull out, usually with some force or effort; also used in an abstract sense;

‘pull weeds’; ‘extract a bad tooth’; ‘take out a splinter’; ‘extract information from the telegram’;

Extractverb

get despite difficulties or obstacles;

‘I extracted a promise from the Dean for two ne positions’;

Extractverb

deduce (a principle) or construe (a meaning);

‘We drew out some interesting linguistic data from the native informant’;

Extractverb

extract by the process of distillation;

‘distill the essence of this compound’;

Extractverb

separate (a metal) from an ore

Extractverb

obtain from a substance, as by mechanical action;

‘Italians express coffee rather than filter it’;

Extractverb

take out of a literary work in order to cite or copy

Extractverb

calculate the root of a number

Extractverb

remove or take out, especially by effort or force

‘the fossils are extracted from the chalk’;

Extractverb

obtain (a substance or resource) from something by a special method

‘lead was extracted from the copper’;

Extractverb

obtain (something such as money or information) from someone unwilling to give it

‘I won't let you go without trying to extract a promise from you’;

Extractverb

select (a passage from a text, film, or piece of music) for quotation, performance, or reproduction

‘the table is extracted from the report’;

Extractverb

derive (an idea) from a body of information

‘there are few attempts to extract generalities about the nature of the disciplines’;

Extractverb

calculate (a root of a number)

‘early computers had an instruction to extract a square root’;

Extractnoun

a short passage taken from a text, film, or piece of music

‘an extract from a historical film’;

Extractnoun

a preparation containing the active ingredient of a substance in concentrated form

‘natural plant extracts’; ‘a shampoo with extract of camomile’;

Extract

An extract is a substance made by extracting a part of a raw material, often by using a solvent such as ethanol, oil or water. Extracts may be sold as tinctures, absolutes or in powder form.

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