VS.

Ditch vs. Swale

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Ditchnoun

A trench; a long, shallow indentation, as for irrigation or drainage.

‘Digging ditches has long been considered one of the most demanding forms of manual labor.’;

Swalenoun

A low tract of moist or marshy land.

Ditchnoun

alternative form of deech

Swalenoun

A long narrow and shallow trough between ridges on a beach, running parallel to the coastline.

Ditchverb

(transitive) To discard or abandon.

‘Once the sun came out we ditched our rain-gear and started a campfire.’;

Swalenoun

A shallow troughlike depression that's created to carry water during rainstorms or snow melts; a drainage ditch.

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Ditchverb

(intransitive) To deliberately crash-land an airplane on water.

‘When the second engine failed, the pilot was forced to ditch; their last location was just south of the Azores.’;

Swalenoun

A shallow, usually grassy depression sloping downward from a plains upland meadow or level vegetated ridgetop.

Ditchverb

(intransitive) To deliberately not attend classes; to play hookey.

‘The truant officer caught Louise ditching with her friends, and her parents were forced to pay a fine.’;

Swalenoun

A shallow trough dug into the land on contour (horizontally with no slope). Its purpose being to allow water time to percolate into the soil.

Ditchverb

(intransitive) To dig ditches.

‘Enclosure led to fuller winter employment in hedging and ditching.’;

Swalenoun

A gutter in a candle.

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Ditchverb

(transitive) To dig ditches around.

‘The soldiers ditched the tent to prevent flooding.’;

Swaleverb

alternative form of sweal|nodot=yes(melt and waste away, or singe)

Ditchverb

(transitive) To throw into a ditch.

‘The engine was ditched and turned on its side.’;

Swalenoun

A valley or low place; a tract of low, and usually wet, land; a moor; a fen.

Ditchverb

alternative form of deech

Swalenoun

A gutter in a candle.

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Ditchnoun

A trench made in the earth by digging, particularly a trench for draining wet land, for guarding or fencing inclosures, or for preventing an approach to a town or fortress. In the latter sense, it is called also a moat or a fosse.

Swaleverb

To melt and waste away; to singe. See Sweal, v.

Ditchnoun

Any long, narrow receptacle for water on the surface of the earth.

Ditchverb

To dig a ditch or ditches in; to drain by a ditch or ditches; as, to ditch moist land.

Ditchverb

To surround with a ditch.

Ditchverb

To throw into a ditch; as, the engine was ditched and turned on its side.

Ditchverb

To dig a ditch or ditches.

Ditchnoun

a long narrow excavation in the earth

Ditchnoun

any small natural waterway

Ditchverb

forsake;

‘ditch a lover’;

Ditchverb

throw away;

‘Chuck these old notes’;

Ditchverb

sever all ties with, usually unceremoniously or irresponsibly;

‘The company dumped him after many years of service’; ‘She dumped her boyfriend when she fell in love with a rich man’;

Ditchverb

make an emergency landing on water

Ditchverb

crash or crash-land;

‘ditch a car’; ‘ditch a plane’;

Ditchverb

cut a trench in, as for drainage;

‘ditch the land to drain it’; ‘trench the fields’;

Ditch

A ditch is a small to moderate divot created to channel water. A ditch can be used for drainage, to drain water from low-lying areas, alongside roadways or fields, or to channel water from a more distant source for plant irrigation.

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