VS.

Displacement vs. Distance

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Displacementnoun

The act of displacing, or the state of being displaced; a putting out of place.

Distancenoun

(countable) The amount of space between two points, usually geographical points, usually (but not necessarily) measured along a straight line.

‘The distance to Petersborough is thirty miles.’; ‘From Moscow, the distance is relatively short to Saint Petersburg, relatively long to Novosibirsk, but even greater to Vladivostok.’;

Displacementnoun

The quantity of anything, as water, displaced by a floating body, as by a ship, the weight of the displaced liquid being equal to that of the displacing body.

Distancenoun

Length or interval of time.

Displacementnoun

(chemistry) The process of extracting soluble substances from organic material and the like, whereby a quantity of saturated solvent is displaced, or removed, for another quantity of the solvent.

Distancenoun

The difference; the subjective measure between two quantities.

‘We're narrowing the distance between the two versions of the bill.’; ‘The distance between the lowest and next gear on my bicycle is annoying.’;

Displacementnoun

(fencing) Moving the target to avoid an attack; dodging.

Distancenoun

Remoteness of place; a remote place.

Displacementnoun

(physics) A vector quantity which denotes distance with a directional component.

Distancenoun

Remoteness in succession or relation.

‘the distance between a descendant and his ancestor’;

Displacementnoun

(grammar) The capability of a communication system to refer to things that are not present (that existed or will exist at another time, or that exist at another location).

Distancenoun

A space marked out in the last part of a racecourse.

Displacementnoun

The act of displacing, or the state of being displaced; a putting out of place.

‘Unnecessary displacement of funds.’; ‘The displacement of the sun by parallax.’;

Distancenoun

The entire amount of progress to an objective.

‘He had promised to perform this task, but did not go the distance.’;

Displacementnoun

The quantity of anything, as water, displaced by a floating body, as by a ship, the weight of the displaced liquid being equal to that of the displacing body.

Distancenoun

A withholding of intimacy; alienation; variance.

‘The friendship did not survive the row: they kept each other at a distance.’;

Displacementnoun

The process of extracting soluble substances from organic material and the like, whereby a quantity of saturated solvent is displaced, or removed, for another quantity of the solvent.

Distancenoun

The remoteness or reserve which respect requires; hence, respect; ceremoniousness.

Displacementnoun

an event in which something is displaced without rotation

Distanceverb

(transitive) To move away (from) someone or something.

‘He distanced himself from the comments made by some of his colleagues.’;

Displacementnoun

act of taking the place of another especially using underhanded tactics

Distanceverb

(transitive) To leave at a distance; to outpace, leave behind.

Displacementnoun

the act of uniform movement

Distancenoun

The space between two objects; the length of a line, especially the shortest line joining two points or things that are separate; measure of separation in place.

‘Every particle attracts every other with a force . . . inversely proportioned to the square of the distance.’;

Displacementnoun

(chemistry) a reaction in which an elementary substance displaces and sets free a constituent element from a compound

Distancenoun

Remoteness of place; a remote place.

‘Easily managed from a distance.’; ‘'T is distance lends enchantment to the view.’; ‘[He] waits at distance till he hears from Cato.’;

Displacementnoun

(psychiatry) a defense mechanism that transfers affect or reaction from the original object to some more acceptable one

Distancenoun

A space marked out in the last part of a race course.

‘The horse that ran the whole field out of distance.’;

Displacementnoun

to move something from its natural environment

Distancenoun

Relative space, between troops in ranks, measured from front to rear; - contrasted with interval, which is measured from right to left.

Displacementnoun

act of removing from office or employment

Distancenoun

Space between two antagonists in fencing.

Distancenoun

The part of a picture which contains the representation of those objects which are the farthest away, esp. in a landscape.

Distancenoun

Ideal disjunction; discrepancy; contrariety.

Distancenoun

Length or interval of time; period, past or future, between two eras or events.

‘Ten years' distance between one and the other.’; ‘The writings of Euclid at the distance of two thousand years.’;

Distancenoun

The remoteness or reserve which respect requires; hence, respect; ceremoniousness.

‘I hope your modestyWill know what distance to the crown is due.’; ‘'T is by respect and distance that authority is upheld.’;

Distancenoun

A withholding of intimacy; alienation; coldness; disagreement; variance; restraint; reserve.

‘Setting them [factions] at distance, or at least distrust amongst themselves.’; ‘On the part of Heaven,Now alienated, distance and distaste.’;

Distancenoun

Remoteness in succession or relation; as, the distance between a descendant and his ancestor.

Distancenoun

The interval between two notes; as, the distance of a fourth or seventh.

‘If a man makes me keep my distance, the comfort is he keeps his at the same time.’;

Distanceverb

To place at a distance or remotely.

‘I heard nothing thereof at Oxford, being then miles distanced thence.’;

Distanceverb

To cause to appear as if at a distance; to make seem remote.

‘His peculiar art of distancing an object to aggrandize his space.’;

Distanceverb

To outstrip by as much as a distance (see Distance, n., 3); to leave far behind; to surpass greatly.

‘He distanced the most skillful of his contemporaries.’;

Distancenoun

the property created by the space between two objects or points

Distancenoun

a distant region;

‘I could see it in the distance’;

Distancenoun

size of the gap between two places;

‘the distance from New York to Chicago’; ‘he determined the length of the shortest line segment joining the two points’;

Distancenoun

indifference by personal withdrawal;

‘emotional distance’;

Distancenoun

the interval between two times;

‘the distance from birth to death’; ‘it all happened in the space of 10 minutes’;

Distancenoun

a remote point in time;

‘if that happens it will be at some distance in the future’; ‘at a distance of ten years he had forgotten many of the details’;

Distanceverb

keep at a distance;

‘we have to distance ourselves from these events in order to continue living’;

Distanceverb

go far ahead of;

‘He outdistanced the other runners’;

Distancenoun

the length of the space between two points

‘you may have to walk long distances’; ‘I cycled the short distance home’;

Distancenoun

the condition of being far off; remoteness

‘distance makes things look small’;

Distancenoun

a far-off point

‘watching them from a distance’;

Distancenoun

the more remote part of what is visible or discernible

‘they sped off into the distance’; ‘I heard police sirens in the distance’;

Distancenoun

an interval of time

‘the sort of goal which remains in the memory even at a distance of six years’;

Distancenoun

the full length of a race

‘he claimed the 100 m title in only his second race over the distance’;

Distancenoun

a space of more than twenty lengths between two finishers in a race

‘he stormed home by a distance in the Handicap Chase’;

Distancenoun

a length of 240 yards from the winning post on a racecourse.

Distancenoun

the distance from the winning post which a horse must have reached when the winner finishes in order to qualify for a subsequent heat.

Distancenoun

the scheduled length of a fight

‘he has won his first five fights inside the distance’;

Distancenoun

the avoidance of familiarity; reserve

‘a mix of warmth and distance makes a good neighbour’;

Distanceverb

make (someone or something) far off or remote in position or nature

‘her mother wished to distance her from the rough village children’;

Distanceverb

declare that one is not connected with or a supporter of (someone or something)

‘he sought to distance himself from the proposals’;

Distanceverb

beat (a horse) by a distance.

Distance

Distance is a numerical measurement of how far apart objects or points are. In physics or everyday usage, distance may refer to a physical length or an estimation based on other criteria (e.g.

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